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Bridget Ellen Philippa Bourke, Dane Francis Baker and Andrea Jane Braakhuis

Social media such as blogs, social network sites, and media sharing sites are rapidly becoming a quick and easy avenue for consumers to access well-presented nutrition information. Not only can registered practitioners “post,” “tweet,” or “blog” nutrition information, so can any other user

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Fernando Borges

personnel in different areas of a soccer club ( Gasparini, 2000 ), from nutritionists to media experts, to the point that it is possible to start thinking about the influence of media on the organization of soccer clubs. Historically, boundaries between media and sport have been very fluid. First, the

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Travis R. Bell and Karen L. Hartman

The ability to harness and effectively use social media in sport constantly evolves. While social-media interaction rapidly increases for athletes and sport organizations, what information is shared, and when, continues to be a challenge, especially in the event of a breaking news story. Scholars

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Jo Ann M. Buysse and Bria Borcherding

DePauw’s (1997) theoretical construct of sport and how we view the body focuses on three socially constructed ideals of physicality, masculinity, and sexuality. Those who do not fit into these ideals are marginalized when it comes to sport participation and media coverage. In this study the authors examined photographs from 12 print newspapers in five countries during the 2008 Paralympic Games in Beijing to determine how Paralympic athletes were treated. They examined the number of photographs and the content of each to determine whether athletes with disabilities are portrayed as tokens who are marginalized or treated as elite athletes. The findings support DePauw’s construct and point to gender and disability differences and hierarchy in print-media photographs.

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Andrea N. Geurin

demands to build a new media presence by maintaining their own website; providing frequent updates on social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram; writing blog posts; and engaging with fans and other stakeholders online. Peña, Arauz, Sha, and Garcia ( 2011 ) stated that new media “is

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Nicholas Wise and John Harris

Carlos Tevez is an Argentinean football player who plays for Manchester City in the English Premier League. Having previously played for City’s fierce local rivals, Manchester United, he has forged an interesting identity in the city. This study analyzes the various meanings allotted to him, with emphasis on his presence surrounding the construction of alternative (re)presentations of Argentina in the local (Manchester) and national (England) media. A host of newspaper articles surrounding his transfer to Manchester City and the first derby match of the season was used as the base for this study. The conceptual approach incorporates imaginative geographies of sport, relating to how individuals create contested identities of place.

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Celina H. Shirazipour, Madelaine Meehan and Amy E. Latimer-Cheung

The Invictus Games are a parasport competition for service members and veterans with illnesses and injuries. The 2014 Games were aired by the BBC, for a total of 12 hr of coverage. This study aimed to investigate what messages were conveyed regarding parasport for veterans during the BBC’s Invictus Games broadcast. A content analysis was conducted. Five qualitative themes were identified: sport as rehabilitation, the promotion of ability over disability, the social environment, key outcomes of participation, and the importance of competition. Quantitative results indicated that 2 segment types accounted for the majority of the broadcast: sport coverage (50.57%) and athlete experiences (12.56%). Around half of the coverage focused on participants with a physical disability (51.62%). The findings demonstrate key similarities to and differences from previous explorations of parasport media coverage, with the needs of the event and athlete population potentially influencing the broadcast.

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Kate Ferrara, Jan Burns and Hayley Mills

Despite some changes to the way that people with intellectual disabilities (ID) are viewed in society, negative attitudes prevail. One of the aspirations of the 2012 Paralympic games was to influence the public’s attitudes toward people with disabilities. The aim of this study was to investigate whether stimuli depicting people with ID performing at Paralympic level of competition change attitudes toward ID. A mixed randomized comparison design was employed comparing 2 groups: those who viewed Paralympic-level ID sport footage and information and those who viewed Olympic footage and information. One hundred fourteen students, mean age 25 yr, were administered measures of implicit (subconscious) attitudes toward disability and explicit (belief-based) attitudes toward ID. Implicit attitudes significantly changed in a positive direction for both groups. The findings provide evidence that both Paralympic (ID) and Olympic media coverage may have at least a short-term effect on attitudes toward people with disabilities.

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Trygve B. Broch

This article explores gendered sport communication in Norway. The data highlight Norwegian TV2’s live game commentaries of the 2009 women’s handball world championships, as well as live and studio commentary and journalistic reports concerning the Norwegian national women’s handball team from 2009 to 2013. The narrative-analytic approach is structural-hermeneutic and concerned with processes of meaning making. Instead of reading off gender/macrostructure in data, this project maps the semiotic culture structure of mediated women’s handball and shows how gendered meaning is creatively used to inform understandings of female handballers’ situated practices. The analysis first outlines the cultural binaries that constrain the media presentations of Norwegian women’s handball, then scrutinizes how gendered conceptions of sport and female athletes are used to understand this binary culture structure. Analytically revealed is a staging of Norwegian women’s handball that portrays successful and powerful female bodies’ contextual conduct. Norwegian women handballers are playing the aggressive and physically violent game in what is analyzed as a gender-appropriate manner.

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Nancy Rivenburgh

The 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games was a sporting and financial success, yet an international image disaster. Atlanta’s goal to shine on a global stage was met with harsh criticism and stereotypical portrayals by media nationally and around the world. What happened? Using a multimethod approach, including content analyses of print and broadcast media in 27 countries, review of institutional reports, and observation of media operations during the Games, this study identifies four key factors largely responsible for Atlanta’s image disaster as Olympic host. In doing so, it provides an exemplar case study of the complex challenges faced by hosts of global media events in their efforts to garner favorable international media coverage. A secondary purpose of this case study is to summarize the preparations, process, and innovations related to media use in the Atlanta Games. Such an account of Atlanta 1996 is missing in the current Olympics literature.