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Brenton J. Baguley, Jessica Zilujko, Michael D. Leveritt, Ben Desbrow and Christopher Irwin

The aim of this study was to compare the effect of ad libitum intake of a milk-based liquid meal supplement against a carbohydrate-electrolyte sports drink following exercise induced fluid loss. Seven male participants (age 22.3 ± 3.4 years, height 179.3 ± 7.9 cm, body mass 74.3 ± 7.3 kg; mean ± SD) completed 4 separate trials and lost 1.89 ± 0.44% body mass through moderate intensity exercise in the laboratory. After exercise, participants consumed ad libitum over 2 h a milk-based liquid meal supplement (Sustagen Sport) on two of the trials (S1, S2) or a carbohydrate-electrolyte sports drink (Powerade) on two of the trials (P1, P2), with an additional 1 hr observational period. Measures of body mass, urine output, gastrointestinal tolerance and palatability were collected throughout the recovery period. Participants consumed significantly more Powerade than Sustagen Sport over the 2 h rehydration period (P1 = 2225 ± 888 ml, P2 = 2602 ± 1119 mL, S1 = 1375 ± 711 mL, S2 = 1447 ± 857 ml). Total urine output on both Sustagen trails was significantly lower than the second Powerade trial (P2 = 1447 ± 656 ml, S1 = 153 ± 62 ml, S2 = 182 ± 118 mL; p < .05) and trended toward being lower compared with the first Powerade trial (P1 = 1057 ± 699 ml vs. S1, p = .067 and vs. S2, p = .061). No significant differences in net fluid balance were observed between any of the drinks at the conclusion of each trial (P1 = −0.50 ±0. 46 kg, P2 = −0.40 ± 0.35 kg, S1 = −0.61 ± 0.74 kg, S2 = −0.45 ± 0.58 kg). Gastrointestinal tolerance and beverage palatability measures indicated Powerade to be preferred as a rehydration beverage. Ad libitum milk-based liquid meal supplement results in similar net fluid balance as a carbohydrate-electrolyte sports drink after exercise induced fluid loss.

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Karen Reid

Flatwater kayaking requires upper-body muscle strength and a lean body composition. This case study describes a nutrition intervention with a 19-year-old male elite sprint kayaker to increase muscle mass and improve recovery posttraining. Before the intervention, average daily energy intake was 13.6 ± 2.5 MJ (M ± SD; protein, 1.8 g/kg; carbohydrate, 3.6 g/kg), and the athlete was unable to eat sufficient food to meet the energy demands of training. During the 18-month intervention period, the athlete’s daily energy intake increased to 22.1 ± 3.8 MJ (protein, 3.2 g/kg; carbohydrate, 7.7 g/kg) by including milk-based drinks pre- and posttraining and before bed and an additional carbohydrate-based snack midmorning. This simple dietary intervention, along with a structured strength and conditioning program, resulted in an increase of 10 kg body mass with minimal change in body fat percentage. Adequate vitamin D status was maintained without the need for supplementation during the intervention period. In addition, the athlete reported the milk-based drinks and carbohydrate snacks were easy to consume, and no adverse side effects were experienced. This was the first time the athlete was able to maintain weight during intensive phases of the training cycle.

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Anita L. Stewart, Melanie Grossman, Nathalie Bera, Dawn E. Gillis, Nina Sperber, Martha Castrillo, Leslie Pruitt, Barbara McLellan, Martha Milk, Kate Clayton and Diana Cassady

Diffusing research-based physical activity programs in underserved communities could improve the health of ethnically diverse populations. We utilized a multilevel, community-based approach to determine attitudes, resources, needs, and barriers to physical activity and the potential diffusion of a physical activity promotion program to reach minority and lower-income older adults. Formative research using focus groups and individual interviews elicited feedback from multiple community sectors: community members, task force and coalition members, administrators, service implementers, health care providers, and physical activity instructors. Using qualitative data analysis, 47 transcripts (N = 197) were analyzed. Most sectors identified needs for culturally diverse resources, promotion of existing resources, demonstration of future cost savings, and culturally tailored, proactive outreach. The program was viewed favorably, especially if integrated into existing resources. Linking sectors to connect resources and expertise was considered essential. Complexities of such large-scale collaborations were identified. These results may guide communities interested in diffusing health promotion interventions.

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Daniel P. Joaquim, Claudia R. Juzwiak and Ciro Winckler

juice, milk, and fruits (three types). Lunch and dinner: vegetables (five types: two raw leaves, two raw vegetables, and one cooked or steamed vegetable), meat dishes (two options), side dishes (white and brown rice, beans, cooked pasta, or tubers), and dessert (two types of sweets and two types of

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Mark Messina, Heidi Lynch, Jared M. Dickinson and Katharine E. Reed

 al., 2015 ). Soy protein is often considered to be the quintessential plant protein, and as such, it is often compared with animal proteins in various animal and human studies. Although foods such as tofu, miso, and soy milk are the most popular forms of soy throughout Asia, many intervention animal studies

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Sharon L. Miller, P. Courtney Gaine, Carl M. Maresh, Lawrence E. Armstrong, Cara B. Ebbeling, Linda S. Lamont and Nancy R. Rodriguez

This study determined the effect of nutritional supplementation throughout endurance exercise on whole-body leucine kinetics (leucine rate of appearance [Ra], oxidation [Ox], and nonoxidative leucine disposal [NOLD]) during recovery. Five trained men underwent a 2-h run at 65% VO2max, during which a carbohydrate (CHO), mixed protein-carbohydrate (milk), or placebo (PLA) drink was consumed. Leucine kinetics were assessed during recovery using a primed, continuous infusion of 1-13C leucine. Leucine Ra and NOLD were lower for milk than for PLA. Ox was higher after milk-supplemented exercise than after CHO or PLA. Although consuming milk during the run affected whole-body leucine kinetics, the benefits of such a practice for athletes remain unclear. Additional studies are needed to determine whether protein supplementation during exercise can optimize protein utilization during recovery.

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June C. Alberici, Peter A. Farrell, Penny M. Kris-Etherton and Carol A. Shively

This study examined the effects of preexercise candy bar ingestion on glycemic response, substrate utilization, and performance ie 8 trained male cyclists. The cyclists randomly ingested oee large milk chocolate bar (1CB), two large milk chocolate bars (2CB), or a placebo (P) 30 min prior to a 90-min cycle ride at 70% VO2max followed by a 33-W increase every 2 min until exhaustion (~10 min). Glucose decreased after 15 min of exercise but returned to preexercise values by 30 min of exercise. Glucose concentration for 2CB was significantly higher than for P and 1CB at exhaustion, Insulin concentration increased in response to ICB and 2CB and returned to preexercise values within 15 min of exercise. No significant differences were noted for free fatty acid (FFA) concentrations, Jactate concentrations, respiratory exchange ratio, total carbohydrate oxidation, or estimated fat and carbohydrate oxidation rates. Time to exhaustion was similar among the groups. The results suggest that the transient lowering of blood glucose observed with preexercise milk chocolate bar ingestion 30 min prior to exercise may not cause major metabolic perturbations that impair athletic performance in trained athletes performing moderately intense cycle exercise.

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Louise M. Burke, Julie A Winter, David Cameron-Smith, Marc Enslen, Michelle Farnfield and Jacques Decombaz

The authors undertook 2 crossover-designed studies to characterize plasma amino acid (AA) responses to the intake of 20 g of protein. In Study 1, 15 untrained and overnight-fasted subjects consumed 20 g protein from skim milk, soy milk, beefsteak, boiled egg, and a liquid meal supplement. In Study 2, 10 fasted endurance-trained subjects consumed 20 g protein from a protein-rich sports bar at rest and after a 60-min submaximal ride. Plasma AA concentrations were measured immediately before and for 180 min after food ingestion using a gas-chromatography flame-ionization detection technique. A pharmacokinetic analysis was undertaken for profiles of total AAs (TAA), essential AAs, branched-chain AAs (BCAA), and leucine. Although area-under-the-curve values for plasma TAA were similar across protein sources, the pattern of aminoacidemia showed robust differences between foods, with liquid forms of protein achieving peak concentrations twice as quickly after ingestion as solid protein-rich foods (e.g., ~50 min vs ~100 min) and skim milk achieving a significantly faster peak leucine concentration than all other foods (~25 min). Completing exercise before ingesting protein sources did not cause statistically significant changes in the pattern of delivery of key AAs, BCAAs, and leucine apart from a 20–40% increase in the rate of elimination. These results may be useful to plan the type and timing of intake of protein-rich foods to maximize the protein synthetic response to various stimuli such as exercise.

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Tracey J. Smith, Scott J. Montain, Danielle Anderson and Andrew J. Young

Purpose:

To examine how different proteins in a carbohydrate-protein beverage affect postprandial amino acid (AA), glucose, and insulin responses.

Methods:

Two randomized, repeated-measures experiments were performed. In one, 10 volunteers drank 3 carbohydrate-protein beverages (380 kcal, 76 g carbohydrate, 19 g protein, 2 g fat) in separate (>7 days) trials, each differing in protein type. All drinks consisted of cocoa (4 g) and nonfat dry milk (1 g) supplemented with casein (CAS), whey (WP), or a casein and whey blend (CAS-WP). Ten additional volunteers consumed the same drinks after 60 min of varying-intensity exercise (60% and 85% VO2peak). Blood glucose, insulin, glucose-dependent insulinotrophic polypeptide (GIP), and AAs were measured every 15–30 min for 4 hr after beverage consumption.

Results:

Branchedchain AA concentrations peaked at 30 min and did not differ between beverages at rest (0.69 ± 0.12 mmol/L) or postexercise (0.70 ± 0.07 mmol/L). There were no significant differences between beverages with respect to initial (time 0–60) or total area under the curve (time 0–240) for any outcome measures at rest or postexercise.

Conclusion:

High-carbohydrate beverages containing various proportions of milk proteins procured from a supplier to the commercial industry had no impact on AA concentration. Retrospective chemical analysis of commercial proteins showed that casein was partially hydrolyzed; therefore, consumers should carefully consider the manufacturer (to ensure that the product contains intact protein) or other factors (i.e., cost or taste) when procuring these beverages for their purported physiological effects.

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Paolo C. Colombani, Eva Kovacs, Petra Frey-Rindova, Walter Frey, Wolfgang Langhans, Myrtha Arnold and Caspar Wenk

A field study was performed to investigate the acute influence of a milk protein hydrolysate supplemented drink (CHO+PRO) on metabolism during and after a marathon run compared to the same drink without protein (CHO). Carbohydrate metabolites and hormones were not influenced by CHO+PRO. Levels of plasma free fatty acids were significantly lower and levels of urea and most amino acids were significantly higher with CHO+PRO. Sweat urea and ammonia nitrogen excretion during the run as well as urinary 3-methylhistidine excretion during the entire exercise day was similar with both treatments. Urinary total nitrogen was significantly increased and urinary pH decreased with CHO+PRO. It was concluded that the supplemented protein was absorbed and probably at least partially oxidized during the run and that no obvious negative metabolic effects occurred. CHO+PRO did not acutely affect myofibrillar protein breakdown as assessed by the 3-methylhistidine method: however, total body protein breakdown was not measured.