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Kerem Shuval, Tammy Leonard, James Murdoch, Margaret O. Caughy, Harold W. Kohl III and Celette Sugg Skinner

Background:

Numerous studies have documented adverse health effects from prolonged sitting and TV viewing. These sedentary pastimes are linked to increased risk for obesity and other cardiometabolic risk factors. No studies, however, have examined these associations specifically in low-income, minority communities in the US.

Methods:

This cross-sectional, community-based study was conducted in South Dallas, TX. Multivariable ordered logistic regression models were used to examine the association between sedentary behaviors (self-report) and measures of objectively assessed obesity (BMI, waist circumference).

Results:

Among a low-income, ethnic-minority population, there were independent and significant associations between higher levels of sitting time, computer use, and transit time with elevated BMI (P < .05). Elevated waist circumference was also linked to increased sitting time, computer use, and transit time, yet without statistical significance.

Conclusions:

Increased time spent in passive-leisure activities is a risk marker for obesity in this population.

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Emily Lees, Wendell C. Taylor, Joseph T. Hepworth, Karina Feliz, Andrea Cassells and Jonathan N. Tobin

Despite the numerous benefits of physical activity, older adults continue to be more sedentary than their younger counterparts, and sedentary behavior is more prevalent among older racial and ethnic minorities than among Whites. This study used the nominal group technique (NGT) to examine participants’ perceptions of what neighborhood environmental changes would encourage greater physical activity for older African American and Hispanic women. Participants age 50–75 years were recruited from 2 urban community health clinics. Nine NGT sessions (45 participants) were conducted. The women were asked what changes in their neighborhood environment would encourage them to become more physically active. Responses to the research question were tabulated, and qualitative analysis was used to identify themes and categories. Major categories were physical environment changes, safety, and activities/social support. Although the physical environment received the greatest number of points, concerns for personal safety cut across categories. Participants indicated the need for more facilities in which to be active.

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Tyler G. Johnson, Timothy A. Brusseau, Paul W. Darst, Pamela H. Kulinna and Janel White-Taylor

Background:

The purposes of this study were to describe and analyze the steps/d of nonwhite minority children and youth by gender, grade level, race/ethnicity, and mode of school transportation. A secondary purpose was to compare the steps/d of minority children and youth to their Caucasian grade-level counterparts.

Methods:

Participants were 547 minority youth grades 5 to 8 from 4 urban schools. Participants wore sealed pedometers for 6 consecutive week/school days. Three hundred and ten participants responded to a questionnaire concerning their mode of transportation to and from school.

Results:

Statistical analyses indicated a main effect for gender (F(3, 546) = 13.50, P < .001) with no interaction. Boys (12,589 ± 3921) accumulated significantly more steps/d than girls (9,539 ± 3,135). Further analyses also revealed a significant main effect for mode of school transportation (F(2, 309) = 15.97, P ≤ .001). Walkers (12,614 ± 4169) obtained significantly more steps/d than car (10,021 ± 2856) or bus (10,230 ± 3666) transit users.

Conclusions:

Minority boys obtain similar steps/d as their Caucasian grade-level counterparts; minority girls obtain less steps/d than their Caucasian grade-level counterparts. Minority youth who actively commute are more likely to meet PA recommendations than nonactive commuters.

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Ya-Wen Hsu, Chih-Ping Chou, Britni R. Belcher, Selena T. Nguyen-Rodriguez, Marc J. Weigensberg, Arianna D. McClain and Donna Spruijt-Metz

While most studies have focused on investigating the preventive effects of physical activity on metabolic risk, the longitudinal impacts of metabolic syndrome (MetS) on activity levels is poorly understood. This study aims to examine the influence of MetS on initial activity levels and the trajectory of activity levels in Latina and African American female children over 12 months (n = 55, 9 ± 1 years). Metabolic measures, including fat and lean tissue mass by BodPod, fasting glucose, lipids, blood pressure, and waist circumference, were collected at baseline. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and sedentary behavior by accelerometry were collected on a quarterly basis. There were no significant differences in either initial activity levels by MetS status (Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity: 33 ± 12 mins/day for MetS, 48 ± 28 mins/day for Non-MetS, p = .12; sedentary behavior: 408 ± 57 mins/day for MetS, 421 ± 72 mins/day for Non-MetS, p = .67). Longitudinal declines in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (p = .038) and increases in sedentary behavior (p = .003) were found. Daily sedentary behavior increased by 82.64 more minutes in youth with MetS than in those without over one year (p = .015). This study yields the first evidence of the adverse effect of MetS on sedentary behavior. Targeted intervention strategies to reduce progressive sedentariness evident in minority youth with MetS are warranted.

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George B. Cunningham and Nicole Melton

In drawing from Herek’s (2007, 2009) sexual stigma and prejudice theory, the purpose of this study was to examine the relationship among prejudice toward sexual minority coaches, religious fundamentalism, sexism, and sexual prejudice and to determine whether race affected these relationships. The authors collected data from 238 parents. Results indicated that Asians expressed greater sexual prejudice than Latinos and Whites, while African Americans expressed more religious fundamentalism than did Whites. There were also differences in the associations among the variables. For African Americans, sexism held the strongest association with prejudice toward sexual minority coaches. While for Asians and Whites, religious fundamentalism held the strongest association, contact with lesbian and gay friends was a significant predictor of prejudice for Asians, but not for the other groups. For Latinos, both religious fundamentalism and sexism were associated with sexual prejudice. The authors discuss the results in terms of theoretical and practical implications.

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Kristy McCray

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Gina Many, Maria-Eugenia Hurtado, Charles Tanner, Joseph Houmard, Heather Gordish-Dressman, Jung-Jun Park, Gabriel Uwaifo, William Kraus, James Hagberg and Eric Hoffman

We initiated a pilot study to investigate the effects of 8 wks of aerobic exercise training (ET) on insulin sensitivity and inflammatory markers in obese and insulin-resistant minority adolescents. Eleven morbidly obese (BMI 41.4 ± 1.8 kg/m2) minority adolescents were entered into a supervised ET intervention (~180 min/wk at 40–55%VO2PeakR [(VO2Peak − VO2Rest)/VO2Rest]). The effects of training on insulin sensitivity (SI), inflammation and other metabolic syndrome features were examined. Results: Insulin action improved in response to training, as indicated by a ~37% increase in SI (p = .018). Plasma levels of several proinflammatory cytokines were reduced in response to ET, as indicated by significant decrements in sTNF-R, CCL2, MPO, IL-6, resistin, and leptin, with no significant changes in hsCRP. ET induced reductions in BMI and percent total body fat. Conclusions: The present study supports the efficacy of ET interventions on metabolic syndrome features in morbidly obese minority youth.

Nosotros iniciamos un estudio piloto para investigar los efectos de 8 semanas de entrenamiento con ejercicios aeróbicos (EA) sobre la sensibilidad insulinica y los marcadores inflamatorios en un grupo minoritario de adolescentes abesos con resistencia a lá insulina. Once adolescentes con obesidad mórbida (IMC 41, 4+1.8kg/m2) fueron asignados a un grupo de intervención que realizo un EA supervisado (~180 min/semana al 40-55%VO2 picoR [(VO2Pico − VO2Reposo)/VO2Reposo]). Se analizo el efecto del entrenamiento sobre la sensibilidad insulinica (IS), inflamación y otras características del síndrome metabòlico. RESULATDOS: El incremento del 37% en la SI (p = 0.018) indico que La acción de la insulina mejora en respuesta al entrenamiento. Como indican la disminución significativa de sTNF-R, CCL2, MPO, IL-6, resistina, and leptina, y la falta de cambios significativos en hsCR, los niveles plasmáticos de varias citoquinas proinflamatorias se redujeron en respuesta al EA. Además, el entrenamiento produjo una reducción del IMC y del porcentaje de grasa corporal. CONCLUSIONES: Los resultados del presente estudio apoyan la eficacia de una intervención con EA sobre las características del síndrome metabólico en un grupo minoritario de adolescentes con obesidad mórbida.

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Michael B. Edwards and George Cunningham

Background:

Racial health disparities are more pronounced among older adults. Few studies have examined how racism influences health behaviors. This study’s purpose was to examine how opportunities for physical activity (PA) and community racism are associated with older racial minorities’ reported engagement in PA. We also investigated how PA levels influenced health.

Methods:

We analyzed survey data obtained from a health assessment conducted in 3360 households in Texas, USA, which included items pertaining to PA, community characteristics, and health.

Results:

Our sample contained 195 women and 85 men (mean age 70.16), most of whom were African American. We found no direct relationship between opportunities and PA. Results suggested that perceived community racism moderated this association. When community racism was low, respondents found ways to be active whether they perceived opportunities or not. When community racism was high, perceived lack of opportunities significantly impeded PA engagement. We found the expected association between PA and health.

Conclusions:

Results suggested that negative effects of community racism were counteracted through increased opportunities for PA.

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Iris Buder, Cathleen Zick, Norman Waitzman, Sara Simonsen, Grant Sunada and Kathleen Digre

); environmental policy (eg, enhancing access to public spaces used for PA); and/or behavioral and social strategies (eg, formal social support groups to encourage healthy eating). 10 – 12 A few of these efforts have targeted minority groups that are at high risk for not meeting the recommendations. 13 – 15

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Daniel F. Perez, Paul G. Ritvo, Patrick E. Brown, Eric Holowaty and Chris Ardern

Background:

The role of social-environmental factors in physical activity (PA) within lower income and ethnic minority populations is understudied. This study explored correlates of age-related PA and perceived walkability (PW).

Methods:

Cross-sectional data (N = 401 women; ≥18 y) were collected within the Jane-Finch community in Toronto, Ontario using questionnaires. Generalized additive models, an extension to multiple regression, were used to estimate effect sizes and standard errors.

Results:

Significant interactions between native language and car access (CA) were observed in PA variation across the lifespan. Individuals were evenly distributed across 4 comparison groups: 29.2% English-NoCA, 24.1% English-CA, 20.7% Non-English-NoCA, and 26.0% NonEnglish-CA. Risk of sedentariness increased with age for native English speakers > 50 years, but appears unaffected by age for other groups. English speakers without CA < 60 years appear least likely to be sedentary, followed by English speakers with CA. In general, an active individual at the 75th percentile of social support for exercise would have 1.62 (CI: 1.22−2.17) times the MET-Hours of PA than an active individual at the 25th percentile of SSE.

Conclusions:

English language facility and car access moderate relationships of social-environmental factors and PA. Further investigation is required to better understand correlates of PA for women in this demographic.