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Mareesa O’Dwyer, Stuart J. Fairclough, Nicola Diane Ridgers, Zoe Rebecca Knowles, Lawrence Foweather and Gareth Stratton

Background:

Identifying periods of the day which are susceptible to varying levels of physical activity (PA) may help identify key times to intervene and potentially change preschool children’s PA behaviors. This study assessed variability of objectively measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) during weekdays and weekend days among preschool children.

Methods:

One hundred and eighty-eight children (aged 3 to 5 years; 53.2% boys) from a northwest English city wore uni-axial accelerometers for 7 consecutive days.

Results:

Higher levels of MVPA were recorded in boys, particularly those who attended preschool for a half day. Children who attended preschool for a full day engaged in 11.1 minutes less MVPA than children who attended for a half day. After-school hours were characterized by a decrease in activity for all groups. Patterns of activity during the weekend were smoother with less variability.

Conclusion:

This study identified discrete segments of the week, specifically afterschool and during the weekend, when preschoolers engage in low levels of PA. Higher levels of MVPA among children who attended preschool for less time each day suggests that the structured preschool environment is related to decreased activity. Consequently, there is a need for interventions in young children to focus on school and home environments.

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Tiego A. Diniz, Fabricio E. Rossi, Clara Suemi da Costa Rosa, Jorge Mota and Ismael F. Freitas-Junior

The objective of this study was to compare moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), minutes per week (min/wk), and fulfillment of the current recommendation (150 min/wk of MVPA) based on different cut-points in postmenopausal women. The sample was composed of 233 postmenopausal women aged 59.8 ± 6.7 years old. MVPA was measured using triaxial accelerometers. Accelerometers were initialized to collect in 60-s epochs. Participants were included if using at least 5 days. MVPA min/wk were obtained using Freedson, Troiano, Copeland, and Sasaki cut-points. Box-plot indicated large mean differences between almost all cut-points, except for Freedson and Troiano (9.3 [95% LoA: –5.6; 24.3] min/wk). The proportion of women who achieved 150 min/wk of MVPA was similar between Freedson and Troiano (31% vs. 30%). Sasaki and Copeland cut-points resulted in a greater proportion than other cut-points. We concluded that the cut-points analyzed generated different results in MVPA min/wk and low agreement when using current guidelines for MVPA pattern classification, except for the comparisons between Freedson and Troiano cut-points.

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Aristides M. Machado-Rodrigues, Neiva Leite, Manuel J. Coelho e Silva, João Valente-dos-Santos, Raul A. Martins, Luis PG Mascarenhas, Margaret CS Boguszewski, Cristina Padez and Robert M. Malina

Background:

Associations of metabolic syndrome (MetS) with lifestyle behaviors in youth is potentially important for identifying subgroups at risk and encourage interventions. This study evaluates the associations among the clustering of metabolic risk factors and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in youth.

Methods:

The sample comprised 522 girls and 402 boys (N = 924) aged 11 to 17 years. Height, weight, waist circumference (WC), fasting glucose, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood pressures were measured. Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) was assessed using the 20-m shuttle run test. MVPA was estimated with a 3-day diary. Outcome variables were statistically normalized and expressed as z scores. A clustered metabolic risk score was computed as the mean of z scores. Multiple linear regression was used to test associations between metabolic risk and MVPA by sex, adjusted for age, WC, and CRF.

Results:

After adjustment for potential confounders, MVPA was inversely associated with the clustering of metabolic risk factors in girls, but not in boys; in addition, after adjusting for WC, the statistical model of that relationship was substantially improved in girls.

Conclusion:

MVPA was independently associated with increased risk of MetS in girls. Additional efforts are needed to encourage research with different analytical approach and standardization of criteria for MetS in youth.

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Jill M. Dempsey, Jay C. Kimiecik and Thelma S. Horn

This investigation examined parental influence on children’s moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) participation via an expectancy-value model that included parents’ behavior, parents’ beliefs about their children’s MVPA, and children’s beliefs about their MVPA. The influence of parents on their children’s MVPA was investigated via questionnaires tapping the belief systems of fourth- and fifth-grade children (n=71) and their parents (n=69). Self-reported MVPA was assessed for parents and children. Correlational analyses demonstrated a number of significant relationships between parents’ belief systems and children’s MVPA behavior and children’s belief systems and their physical activity participation. Based on hierarchical regression analyses, there was no evidence of a positive relationship between parents’ physical activity behavior (role modeling) and children’s physical activity behavior. Parents’ perceptions of their children’s MVPA competence was the only parent belief system variable related to children’s MVPA participation. In addition, children’s task orientation and expectancies significantly predicted their MVPA participation.

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Rachel E. Klaren, Jeffer E. Sasaki, Edward McAuley and Robert W. Motl

Background:

Physical inactivity is common in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS), but there is very little known about the pattern and predictors of changes in physical activity over time.

Purpose:

This study examined changes in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) over a 30-month time period and the demographic and clinical predictors of such changes in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS).

Methods:

269 persons with MS wore an accelerometer for a 7-day period and completed a demographic/clinical scale every 6 months over a 30-month period. Data were analyzed using latent class growth modeling (LCGM).

Results:

LCGM identified a two-class model for changes in levels of MVPA over time. Class 1 involved higher initial levels of MVPA and linear decreases in MVPA over time, whereas Class 2 involved lower initial levels of MVPA and linear increases in MVPA over time. LCGM further indicated that males were more likely (OR = 5.8, P < .05) and those with higher disability status were less likely (OR = 0.51, P < .05) to belong to Class 1 than Class 2.

Conclusion:

Levels of MVPA change over time in persons with RRMS and the pattern of change suggests that behavioral physical activity interventions for persons with MS might target men and those with lower disability.

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Andreia Nogueira Pizarro, Jasper Schipperijn, José Carlos Ribeiro, António Figueiredo, Jorge Mota and Maria Paula Santos

Background:

Identifying where children spend their activity-time may help define relevant domains for effective PA promotion and better understand the relation between PA and environment. Our study aimed to identify how boys and girls allocate their active time in the different domains.

Methods:

374 children (201 girls; mean age = 11.7 years) wore an accelerometer and a GPS for 7 days. PALMS software combined data, categorized nonsedentary time and bouts of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Geographical information system allocated activity into 4 domains: school, leisure, transport and home.

Results:

Overall, a higher proportion of time in MVPA was found in the transport domain (45.5%), school (30.5%), leisure (21.3%), and home (2.7%). Gender differences were found for the proportion of time spent across domains. Girls (54.5%) had more MVPA than boys (35.2%) in the transport domain, whereas boys spent more MVPA time in school (37.0%) and leisure (24.9%) than girls (24.7% and 18.1, respectively).

Conclusions:

Interventions to increase transport behavior may be relevant for children’s MVPA. School is an important domain for boys PA, while for girls increasing the supportiveness of the school environment for PA should be a priority. Strategies should consider gender differences when targeting each domain.

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Ketsia Proulx, Annette Majnemer, Noémi Dahan-Oliel, Barbara Mazer, Line Nadeau, Kathleen Vanier and Désirée B. Maltais

Purpose:

Little is known about the physical activity of adolescents born prematurely. This study aimed to: 1) describe relationships between moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in adolescents born prematurely and various factors and, 2) compare their MVPA level to guidelines.

Method:

A secondary analysis was performed using data from 64 adolescents (16.1 ± 2.5 years old, born £29 weeks gestation; 57.8% girls). Time spent in MVPA was based on accelerometry data. Sociodemographic, prematurity and comorbidity variables were based on questionnaire data or, for movement difficulty, from the results of the Movement Assessment Battery for Children—Second Edition.

Results:

Multiple regression analysis showed that participants who were older (b = -4.52, p < .001), female (b = 14.18, p = .014), with movement difficulty (b = 18.64, p = .014), with health problems (b = 11.78, p = .036) and without hyperactive behavior (trend, b = 2.04, p = .099) spent less time in MVPA. Together these variables explained 44.4% of the variance in MVPA. Most participants (79.7%) did not meet Canadian MVPA guidelines.

Conclusion:

Study results suggest that physical activity interventions should especially target adolescents born prematurely who are older, female, with health problems, and with marked movement difficulties.

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Eric E. Wickel, Joey C. Eisenmann and Gregory J. Welk

Background:

This study compared physical activity levels among early, average, and late maturing boys and girls.

Methods:

Physical activity was assessed with an Actigraph accelerometer in 161 (76 boys, 85 girls) 9 to 14 year olds over 7 consecutive days. Anthropometric variables were measured and the maturity offset (ie, years from peak height velocity) was predicted. Biological maturity groups (early, average, and late) were created based on the mean estimated age at peak height velocity for boys and girls separately.

Results:

Levels of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were similar between early, average, and late maturing boys and girls after adjusting for differences in chronological age. Levels of MVPA progressively declined across chronological age in boys and girls (P < .001) and gender differences existed at 10-, 12-, and 13-years, with boys having higher levels than girls (P < .05). When aligned according to biological age, gender-related differences in MVPA did not exist.

Conclusions:

Within this sample of 9 to 14 year old boys and girls, there were no significant differences in MVPA among early, average, and late maturing individuals.

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Luiz Rodrigo Augustemak de Lima, Diego Augusto Santos Silva, Kelly Samara da Silva, Andreia Pelegrini, Isabela de Carlos Back and Edio Luiz Petroski

Purpose:

To examine aerobic fitness, total moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and also patterns in terms of MVPA between children and adolescents with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and controls, and to determine whether differences, if any, are associated with HIV, sex and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART).

Method:

A cross-sectional analysis was carried out with 130 children and adolescents, aged between 8 and 15 years, divided into two groups (HIV group= 65 patients, control group= 65 healthy participants). Total MVPA was measured by accelerometers and 5 and 10-min bouts were estimated. The peak oxygen uptake (peak VO2) was measured by breath-by-breath respiratory exchange in an incremental cycle ergometer test.

Results:

HIV-positive participants had lower peak VO2 (39.2 ± 6.8 vs. 44.5 ± 9.1 ml.kg-1min-1), lower bouts of MVPA of 5-min (19.7 ± 16.6 vs. 26.6 ± 23.5) and 10-min (3.6 ± 3.9 vs. 5.8 ± 7.2), but similar total MVPA (49.5 ± 28.9 vs. 49.1 ± 30.6 min.day-1). HIV infection in untreated, nonprotease inhibitors (PI)- based HAART and PI-based HAART patients was associated with lower 8.5 (95%CI= 12.5–4.6), 7.1 (95%CI= 10.6–3.6) and 4.5 (95%CI= 7.0–2.0) ml.kg-1min-1 of peak VO2.

Conclusion:

Children and adolescents with HIV demonstrated lower aerobic fitness compared with the controls and the absence of HAART may increase peak VO2 impairment. Lower bouts of MVPA were also observed in HIV group despite the similar values of total MVPA of controls.

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Gerson Luis de Moraes Ferrari, Luis Carlos Oliveira, Timoteo Leandro Araujo, Victor Matsudo, Tiago V. Barreira, Catrine Tudor-Locke and Peter Katzmarzyk

This study aimed to analyze the independent associations of accelerometer-determined sedentary behavior, physical activity, and steps/day with body composition variables in Brazilian children. 485 children wore accelerometers for 7 days. Variables included time in sedentary behavior and different physical activity intensities (light, moderate, vigorous, or moderate-to-vigorous) and steps/day. Body fat percentage was measured using a bioelectrical impedance scale, and BMI was calculated. Children spent 55.7% of the awake portion of the day in sedentary behavior, 37.6% in light physical activity, 4.6% in moderate physical activity, and 1.9% in vigorous physical activity. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and steps/day were negatively associated with body composition (BMI and body fat percentage) variables, independent of sex and sedentary behavior. Beta values were higher for vigorous physical activity than moderate physical activity. Vigorous physical activity was negatively associated with BMI (β-.1425) and body fat percentage (β-.3082; p < .0001). In boys, there were significant negative associations between moderate, vigorous, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and steps/day with body composition, and in girls, there was only a negative association with vigorous physical activity, independent of sedentary behavior. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and steps/day (in boys), but especially vigorous physical activity (in boys and girls), are associated with body composition, independent of sedentary behavior. Sedentary behavior was not related with any of the body composition variables once adjusted for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity.