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: One-to-One Support With an Elite Junior Gymnast Nick Wadsworth * 01 01 2019 3 1 41 49 10.1123/cssep.2019-0007 cssep.2019-0007 CASE STUDY 7 Rowing Over the Edge: Nonfunctional Overreaching and Overtraining Syndrome as Maladjustment—Diagnosis and Treatment From a Psychological Perspective

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Bart Roelands and Kevin De Pauw

on nutritional manipulations that aim to get athletes at the start of a race in the best possible shape 1 ; training strategies and training-load-monitoring tools to avoid having athletes crossing the thin line between training and recovery, making them vulnerable to nonfunctional overreaching and

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Editorial Nonfunctional Overreaching, Witches, and the Tour de France Jos J. de Koning IJSPP 7 2015 10 5 541 541 10.1123/ijspp.2015-0291 Original Investigation Reliability of the Dynamic Strength Index in College Athletes Christopher Thomas * Paul A. Jones * Paul Comfort * 7 2015 10 5 542

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* Maria Francesca Piacentini * 5 2015 10 4 520 523 10.1123/ijspp.2014-0264 An Online Training-Monitoring System to Prevent Nonfunctional Overreaching Maria Francesca Piacentini * Romain Meeusen * 5 2015 10 4 524 527 10.1123/ijspp.2014-0270 Cardiac Parasympathetic Activity and Race Performance: An

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Henrikas Paulauskas, Rasa Kreivyte, Aaron T. Scanlan, Alexandre Moreira, Laimonas Siupsinskas and Daniele Conte

fluctuations in TL seems essential to avoid undue spikes in workload and subsequently minimize the risk of nonfunctional overreaching and noncontact injuries occurring. 7 , 8 To the best of our knowledge, only one investigation has comprehensively analyzed the weekly workload changes in basketball players

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Ana C. Holt, Daniel J. Plews, Katherine T. Oberlin-Brown, Fabrice Merien and Andrew E. Kilding

Adaptation to training is maximized when the appropriate balance between training and recovery is achieved, allowing supercompensation to occur. High training loads with insufficient recovery periods compromise training adaptation, which over time can manifest as nonfunctional overreaching and

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Blaine E. Arney, Reese Glover, Andrea Fusco, Cristina Cortis, Jos J. de Koning, Teun van Erp, Salvador Jaime, Richard P. Mikat, John P. Porcari and Carl Foster

Training load (TL) is used to quantify training programs and to determine if athletes are performing prescribed training, with the intent of optimizing the training response and minimizing the occurrence of nonfunctional overreaching, injury, and illness. 1 A number of methods are used to monitor

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Andrea Fusco, Christine Knutson, Charles King, Richard P. Mikat, John P. Porcari, Cristina Cortis and Carl Foster

Careful monitoring is required for adjusting the intensity, duration, and frequency of training in order to maximize performance improvement, while minimizing side effects, such as nonfunctional overreaching, injury, and illness. 1 , 2 There are many objective methods for measuring internal

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Lieselot Decroix, Robert P. Lamberts and Romain Meeusen

fatigue, resulting in decreased performance. 2 In the case of functional overreaching (FO), decreased performance will be reversed after appropriate recovery time in which supercompensation can occur, and improved performance will follow. 2 However, in nonfunctional overreaching (NFO) and overtraining

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Durva Vahia, Adam Kelly, Harry Knapman and Craig A. Williams

nonfunctional overreaching and overtraining compared with recreational players ( 22 ). The Long-Term Athlete Development model classifies players aged 16–18 as in the “training to compete” phase of development with highly structured training ( 12 , 21 ). At this age, players are still developing their physical