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Patricia Marten DiBartolo, Linda Lin, Simone Montoya, Heather Neal and Carey Shaffer

This study reports the psychometric development of a measure to assess individual differences in exercise motivations using a functionalist strategy (Snyder & Cantor, 1997). Factor analyses revealed two subscales for the newly developed Function of Exercise Scale (FES): Weight and Appearance (WA), and Health and Enjoyment (HE). FES-HE scores correlated with better psychological well-being and predicted prospectively monitored as well as concurrently and longitudinally assessed exercise behavior. FES-HE scores also correlated with lower pulse, systolic blood pressure, and salivary cortisol readings, indicating its association with better physical health. In contrast, FES-WA scores correlated with greater depressive and eating disorder symptoms, as well as lower self-esteem, and predicted the later emergence of eating disorder, but not depressive, symptoms. FES-WA scores failed to show a relationship with measures of physical well-being, including exercise engagement and vital sign data. Overall, the FES appears to hold promise as a succinct and psychometrically sound heuristic for meaningfully relating exercise motivations to important indices of both physical and psychological well-being.

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John Mahoney and Stephanie J. Hanrahan

The purpose of this study was to research the experiences of four injured athletes during their rehabilitation from ACL injuries and to examine the potential usefulness of an adapted ACT intervention in addressing individuals’ adherence to rehabilitation protocols and their general psychological well-being. We investigated the usefulness of a brief, 4-session ACT program adapted for educational purposes and presented data as case studies. The case studies suggested that (a) the injured athletes experienced a multitude of private events immediately following injury, throughout their recovery, and when approaching a full return to sport; (b) the injured athletes typically avoided these private events and engaged in emotion-driven behaviors; (c) an adapted ACT approach for educational purposes could be useful on at least a basic level to help injured athletes accept private events, commit to rehabilitation behaviors, and have some certainty about returning to sport; and (d) more could be done to address the needs of injured athletes beyond the structure of our 4-session educational intervention. We concluded that the ACT-based intervention, to a certain extent, educated injured athletes about how to meet the challenges of their recoveries and how to commit to their rehabilitations, as well as to exhibit behaviors that would potentially permit their successful reentries to sport.

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Brian J. Foster and Graig M. Chow

into subjective ( Bradburn, 1969 ), psychological ( Ryff, 1989 ), and social ( Keyes, 1998 ) factors. Subjective well-being is one’s degree of happiness and life satisfaction, with emphasis on feelings and emotions ( Ryan & Deci, 2001 ). In contrast, psychological well-being is considered more

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Flávia Cavalcante Monteiro Melo, Kátia Kamila Félix de Lima, Ana Paula Knackfuss Freitas Silveira, Kesley Pablo Morais de Azevedo, Isis Kelly dos Santos, Humberto Jefferson de Medeiros, José Carlos Leitão and Maria Irany Knackfuss

.1097/00005768-200105000-00005 11323537 10. Hicks AL , Martin KA , Ditor DS , et al . Long-term exercise training in persons with spinal cord injury: effects on strength, arm ergometry performance and psychological well-being . Spinal Cord . 2003 ; 41 : 34 – 43 . PubMed ID: 12494319 doi:10.1038/sj.sc.3101389 12494319 10

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Roberta Gaspar, Natalia Padula, Tatiana B. Freitas, João P.J. de Oliveira and Camila Torriani-Pasin

× per week I: aerobic training = 70% of maximum HR or 3–4 in the adapted scale of Borg. Strength training = 50–80% MR T: strength and aerobic training T: 90–120 min Increased muscle strength. Improved performance in manual cycle ergometer. Improved quality of life and psychological well-being (decreased

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Kylie McNeill, Natalie Durand-Bush and Pierre-Nicolas Lemyre

subjective well-being (i.e., emotional, social, and psychological well-being; Keyes, 2002 ). The data were also coded inductively to capture new categories (e.g., work-life balance, role of facilitator) that emerged from the data ( Hseih & Shannon, 2005 ). To facilitate data coding, the first author

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Kelly P. Arbour-Nicitopoulos, Celina Shirazipour and Krystn Orr

physical activity interventions (both lifestyle physical activity and exercise) for improving physical functioning, psychological well-being, and/or physical activity participation in persons with disabilities. One of the strengths highlighted in this line of research is its diverse use of intervention

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Justine J. Reel and Emily Crouch

bravely tell their stories. They paint a picture of how it is to be powerless in an environment that values athletic success or psychological well-being of a child, adolescent, or young adult. Other manuscripts highlight best practices for approaching athletes who have faced the unspeakable and are trying

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Shaunna M. Burke, Jennifer Brunet, Amanda Wurz, Christina Butler and Andrea Utley

-being as the attainment of happiness through the occurrence of positive affect, the absence of negative affect, and the experience of life satisfaction. The eudaimonic approach, underpinning psychological well-being ( Ryff, 1989 ), defines well-being through six aspects of human actualization: self

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Sheryl Miller and Mary Fry

task-involving climate were positively associated with their BE (using a composite score on the BESAA) and overall psychological well-being. The stronger relationship observed between climate and BE scores by these researchers in comparison to the present study could be related to these dancers