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Marina Arkkukangas, Susanna Tuvemo Johnson, Karin Hellström, Elisabeth Anens, Michail Tonkonogi and Ulf Larsson

has also been applied effectively in other areas of health care ( Miller & Rollnick, 2013 ). This 2-year follow-up randomized controlled trial (RCT), which includes a 3- and 12-month follow-up in older community-dwelling adults who needed walking aids or home support, investigates the effectiveness of

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Jeanette M. Thom, Sharon M. Nelis, Jennifer K. Cooney, John V. Hindle, Ian R. Jones and Linda Clare

eligible for inclusion in the study. There were no other inclusion/exclusion criteria. All participants provided written informed consent. Study Design This small-scale 12-month randomized controlled trial has previously been detailed ( Clare et al., 2012 ; Clare et al., 2015 ). The trial was a GS

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Noemi Moreno-Segura, Celedonia Igual-Camacho, Yéntel Ballester-Gil, María Clara Blasco-Igual and Jose María Blasco

compared Pilates to control groups performing a daily routine, and all the studies were reported before 2013. The current systematic review and meta-analysis provides more up-to-date evidence and includes only randomized controlled trials (RCT). This aims (a) to determine the effects of Pilates on balance

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Chonticha Kaewjoho, Thiwabhorn Thaweewannakij, Lugkana Mato, Saowanee Nakmaroeng, Supaporn Phadungkit and Sugalya Amatachaya

-blind, randomized controlled trial (assessor blinded) in community-dwelling older adults, aged 65 years and older, from several rural communities in Thailand from November 2016 to September 2018 (clinical trial registration number: NCT02919514). The eligible subjects needed to be able to walk independently for at

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Samantha M. Gray, Peggy Chen, Lena Fleig, Paul A. Gardiner, Megan M. McAllister, Joseph H. Puyat, Joanie Sims-Gould, Heather A. McKay, Meghan Winters and Maureen C. Ashe

.1056/NEJMra1510059 27518663 19. Ashe MC , Winters M , Hoppmann CA , et al. “Not just another walking program”: Everyday Activity Supports You (EASY) model—a randomized pilot study for a parallel randomized controlled trial . Pilot and Feasibility Studies . 2015 ; 1 : 4 . doi:10

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Bronagh McGrane, Sarahjane Belton, Stuart J. Fairclough, Danielle Powell and Johann Issartel

findings, the authors cautioned for the need to evaluate the intervention with a larger sample in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). It is evident that there is a lack of FMS proficiency among adolescents, which may lead to difficulties in developing more advanced sport-specific skills. 1 If this lack

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Sharon Hetherington, Paul Swinton, Tim Henwood, Justin Keogh, Paul Gardiner, Anthony Tuckett, Kevin Rouse and Tracy Comans

this particular barrier to participation. The cost savings attributable to decreased health care utilization were also explored in the analyses. Methods Muscling Up Against Disability was a stepped-wedge randomized control trial to assess the effect of a progressive resistance plus balance training

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Francisco Alvarez-Barbosa, Jesús del Pozo-Cruz, Borja del Pozo-Cruz, Antonio García-Hermoso and Rosa María Alfonso-Rosa

, activities of daily living , random allocation and randomized controlled trial ( RCT ). The search queries for the eight electronic databases are shown in Supplementary Material (available online). Study Selection The inclusion criteria (a) were RCT investigating the effects of WBV in

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Ruben Barakat, Mireia Pelaez, Rocio Montejo, Ignacio Refoyo and Javier Coteron

Background:

In spite of an extensive knowledge of the physiologic features of exercise during pregnancy, we still lack a comprehensive understanding of the effects of different types, intensities and duration of exercise throughout pregnancy on maternal and fetal well being. The aim of the current study was to examine the influence of an aerobic exercise program throughout pregnancy on gestational age at the moment of delivery.

Methods:

This study was a randomized controlled trial. Three hundred and twenty Caucasian (Spanish) healthy pregnant women with singleton gestation were randomly assigned to either an exercise (n = 160) or a control (n = 160) group. Gestational age (weeks) and other outcomes were measured. The exercise program included 85 sessions (general fitness class, 3 times/week, 55–60 min/session from weeks 8–10 to weeks 38–39 of pregnancy).

Results:

Two hundred and ninety women were analyzed (exercise group EG, n = 138, control group CG, n = 152). The mean gestational age did not differ between groups (EG= 39.7± 1.3 vs CG= 39.6 ± 1.1 weeks, P = .81). Relative to preterm deliveries in EG we found 6 (4.3%) and 11 (7.2%) in CG, (P = .73).

Conclusions:

A supervised program of moderate exercise performed throughout pregnancy is not a risk of preterm delivery for healthy pregnant women.

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Alyce T. Barnes, Ronald C. Plotnikoff, Clare E. Collins and Philip J. Morgan

Background:

The aim was to assess the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a community-based physical activity (PA) intervention targeting mothers and daughters.

Methods:

A randomized controlled trial of 48 primary school-aged girls and their 40 mothers were randomized to (i) Mothers And Daughters Exercising for Life (MADE4Life) (n = 21 mothers, n = 25 daughters) or (ii) wait-list control (n = 19 mothers, n = 23 daughters). The 8-week program involved 8 sessions; 25-minute separate mothers and daughters education sessions and 60-minutes PA together. Assessments were at baseline, postintervention and 3-month postintervention. Primary outcome measure was daughters’ moderateto-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) (accelerometer). Secondary outcomes included accelerometer-assessed light/moderate/vigorous PA, BMI, waist circumference, body composition, blood pressure, resting heart rate, sedentary behaviors and mothers’ self-reported PA, parenting measures, and cognitions. Intention-to-treat analysis used linear mixed models.

Results:

Recruitment and retention goals were exceeded. Attendance rates, program acceptability and satisfaction were high. There was no significant group-by-time effect for daughters’ %MVPA (–0.08; 95%CI –1.49, 1.33, d = –0.03) or other secondary outcomes for girls (postintervention range d = 0.01 to –0.46). Significant intervention effects were found for mothers’ %VPA (P = .04, d = 0.25) and role modeling (P = .02, d = 0.66).

Conclusion:

MADE4Life was both feasible and acceptable. Although very small effect sizes were found for the daughters, significant changes were seen for mothers (d = 0.25 to 0.66). Future fully powered trials targeting PA in mothers and daughters is warranted.