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Amy Baker, Mary A. Hums, Yoseph Mamo and Damon P.S. Andrew

between students and teachers or professors ( Eliasson, Berggren, & Bondestam, 2000 ; Schrodt, Cawyer, & Sanders, 2003 ; van Eck Peluchette & Jeanquart, 2000 ). However, mentoring in an educational setting is not limited to these relationships. Just as in business, people in academic settings move up

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Gashaw Abeza, David Finch, Norm O’Reilly, Eric MacIntosh and John Nadeau

Emerging from its interdisciplinary roots into a distinct field in the early 1980s ( Berry, 1983 ), relationship marketing (RM) evolved as an important conceptual lens for both marketing scholars and practitioners ( Agariya & Singh, 2011 ). Since Berry’s ( 1983 ) first and formal description of the

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Tammy Horne and Albert V. Carron

Three major issues were examined in the present study: (a) the variables discriminating between compatible and incompatible coach-athlete dyads; (b) the relationship between coach-athlete compatibility and athlete performance; and (c) the relationship between compatibility and athlete satisfaction. Subjects were 77 coach-athlete dyads from female intercollegiate teams. Compatibility was assessed using a sport-adapted version of Schutz's (1966) Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation (FIRO-B) scale and Chelladurai and Saleh's (1980) Leadership Scale for Sports (LSS). Self-ratings of the quality of the coach-athlete relationship, athlete performance, and satisfaction with the coach's leadership were obtained. There were two variables that significantly discriminated between compatible and incompatible dyads. The sole variable predicting athletes' performance perceptions was the score reflecting discrepancy between athlete perceptions and preferences on the LSS reward dimension. Variables predicting athlete satisfaction were discrepancy between athlete perceptions and preferences on the LSS dimensions of training, reward, and social support. Recommendations for future research in this area are discussed.

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Walter Gantz, Lawrence A. Wenner, Christina Carrico and Matthew Knorr

This paper describes the role of televised sports in married life. It documents how adults integrate televised sports into their relationship with their spouse and evaluate its impact on that relationship. Telephone interviews were conducted with 399 married adults residing in San Francisco and Indianapolis. Respondents were asked about their own TV sports viewing behaviors as well as those of their spouse. Televised sports appears to play a generally positive albeit small role in marital life. TV sports viewing often is a shared activity and does not appear to trigger many scheduling or TV viewing conflicts. And, when such conflicts occur, they appear to be resolved amicably and easily. It may be that accommodations for differing interests in TV sports are resolved early in a marital relationship, along with other accommodations that marriage often dictates.

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Phil Ferrar, Lillian Hosea, Miles Henson, Nadine Dubina, Guy Krueger, Jamie Staff and Wade Gilbert

other to ultimately reach their goals. The coach-athlete relationship is a well-established area of study in the coaching literature and is becoming a more targeted area of development in coaching curriculums ( Evans, McGuckin, Gainforth, Bruner, & Coté, 2015 ; Smith, Smoll, & Cummings, 2007

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Jeffrey G. Williams, Lauryn Darnall and Conrad Schumann

Key Points ▸ Spinal range of motion among players is suspected to be compensatory to tightness in the posterior shoulder. ▸ No studies have tested this relationship. ▸ No relationship was observed between thoracolumbar and glenohumeral ranges of motion. Throwing a baseball demands properly

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Christopher R. Hill, Deborah L. Feltz, Stephen Samendinger and Karin A. Pfeiffer

the literature have also highlighted the importance of varying types of self-efficacy beliefs in relationship to PA during both childhood and adolescence ( Van Der Horst, Paw, Twisk, & Van Mechelen, 2007 ; Voskuil & Robbins, 2015 ). However, the literature examining BSE beliefs in adolescents is

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Christopher R. Hill, Deborah L. Feltz, Stephen Samendinger and Karin A. Pfeiffer

the literature have also highlighted the importance of varying types of self-efficacy beliefs in relationship to PA during both childhood and adolescence ( Van Der Horst, Paw, Twisk, & Van Mechelen, 2007 ; Voskuil & Robbins, 2015 ). However, the literature examining BSE beliefs in adolescents is

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Thilo Kunkel, Daniel C. Funk and Daniel Lock

associations linked to a brand ( Gladden & Funk, 2001 , 2002 ; Kunkel, Funk, et al., 2014 ). Although each set of brand associations is conceptually distinct, a formal relationship exists in which the league acts as a master brand and teams operate as a set of sub-brands ( Kunkel et al., 2013 ). The

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Teun van Erp, Carl Foster and Jos J. de Koning

) or the rating of perceived exertion (RPE) to quantify TL. Heart rate is frequently used to determine TL because the technology is widely available, noninvasive, and inexpensive. The use of HR monitoring during exercise is based on the nearly linear relationship between HR and oxygen consumption