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Mansour Eslami, Mohsen Damavandi and Reed Ferber

There is evidence to suggest that navicular drop measures are associated with specific lower-extremity gait biomechanical parameters. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between navicular drop and a) rearfoot eversion excursion, b) tibial internal rotation excursion, c) peak ankle inversion moment, and d) peak knee adduction moment during the stance phase of running. Sixteen able-bodied men having an average age of 28.1 (SD = 5.30) years, weight of 81.5 (SD = 10.40) kg, height of 179.1 (SD = 5.42) cm volunteered and ran barefoot at 170 steps/minute over a force plate. Navicular drop measures were negatively correlated with tibial internal rotation excursion (r = −0.53, P = .01) but not with rearfoot eversion excursion (r = −0.19; P = .23). Significant positive correlations were found between navicular drop and peak knee adduction moment (r = .62, P < .01) and peak ankle inversion moment (r = .60, P < .01). These findings suggest that a low navicular drop measure could be associated with increasing tibial rotation excursion while high navicular drop measure could be associated with increased peak ankle and knee joint moments. These findings indicate that measures of navicular drop explained between 28% and 38% of the variability for measures of tibial internal rotation excursion, peak knee adduction moment and peak ankle inversion moments.

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Bente R. Jensen, Line Hovgaard-Hansen and Katrine L. Cappelen

Running on a lower-body positive-pressure (LBPP) treadmill allows effects of weight support on leg muscle activation to be assessed systematically, and has the potential to facilitate rehabilitation and prevent overloading. The aim was to study the effect of running with weight support on leg muscle activation and to estimate relative knee and ankle joint forces. Runners performed 6-min running sessions at 2.22 m/s and 3.33 m/s, at 100%, 80%, 60%, 40%, and 20% body weight (BW). Surface electromyography, ground reaction force, and running characteristics were measured. Relative knee and ankle joint forces were estimated. Leg muscles responded differently to unweighting during running, reflecting different relative contribution to propulsion and antigravity forces. At 20% BW, knee extensor EMGpeak decreased to 22% at 2.22 m/s and 28% at 3.33 m/s of 100% BW values. Plantar flexors decreased to 52% and 58% at 20% BW, while activity of biceps femoris muscle remained unchanged. Unweighting with LBPP reduced estimated joint force significantly although less than proportional to the degree of weight support (ankle).It was concluded that leg muscle activation adapted to the new biomechanical environment, and the effect of unweighting on estimated knee force was more pronounced than on ankle force.

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Amy Silder, Kyle Gleason and Darryl G. Thelen

We investigated how varying seat tube angle (STA) and hand position affect muscle kinematics and activation patterns during cycling in order to better understand how triathlon-specific bike geometries might mitigate the biomechanical challenges associated with the bike-to-run transition. Whole body motion and lower extremity muscle activities were recorded from 14 triathletes during a series of cycling and treadmill running trials. A total of nine cycling trials were conducted in three hand positions (aero, drops, hoods) and at three STAs (73°, 76°, 79°). Participants also ran on a treadmill at 80, 90, and 100% of their 10-km triathlon race pace. Compared with cycling, running necessitated significantly longer peak musculotendon lengths from the uniarticular hip flexors, knee extensors, ankle plantar flexors and the biarticular hamstrings, rectus femoris, and gastrocnemius muscles. Running also involved significantly longer periods of active muscle lengthening from the quadriceps and ankle plantar flexors. During cycling, increasing the STA alone had no affect on muscle kinematics but did induce significantly greater rectus femoris activity during the upstroke of the crank cycle. Increasing hip extension by varying the hand position induced an increase in hamstring muscle activity, and moved the operating lengths of the uniarticular hip flexor and extensor muscles slightly closer to those seen during running. These combined changes in muscle kinematics and coordination could potentially contribute to the improved running performances that have been previously observed immediately after cycling on a triathlon-specific bicycle.

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Stephanie Chester, Audrey Zucker-Levin, Daniel A. Melcher, Shelby A. Peel, Richard J. Bloomer and Max R. Paquette

The purpose of this study was to compare knee and hip joint kinematics previously associated with anterior knee pain and metabolic cost among conditions including treadmill running (TR), standard elliptical (SE), and lateral elliptical (LE) in healthy runners. Joint kinematics and metabolic parameters of 16 runners were collected during all 3 modalities using motion capture and a metabolic system, respectively. Sagittal knee range of motion (ROM) was greater in LE (P < .001) and SE (P < .001) compared with TR. Frontal and transverse plane hip ROM were greater in LE compared with SE (P < .001) and TR (P < .001). Contralateral pelvic drop ROM was smaller in SE compared with TR (P = .002) and LE (P = .005). Similar oxygen consumption was found during LE and TR (P = .39), but LE (P < .001) and TR (P < .001) required greater oxygen consumption than SE. Although LE yields similar metabolic cost to TR and produces hip kinematics that may help strengthen hip abductors, greater knee flexion and abduction during LE may increase symptoms in runners with anterior knee pain. The findings suggest that research on the implications of elliptical exercise for injured runners is needed.

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Marco Hagen, Ewald M. Hennig and Peter Stieldorf

Nordic walking (NW) was compared with walking (W) and running (R) with respect to upper and lower limb injury risks. 24 NW-instructors performed W, NW, and R trials on a runway covered with artificial turf at controlled speeds. Foot pronation and ground reaction forces were measured as well as shock wave transmission to the right wrist. Comparison of NW and W shows similar results for all of the four chosen velocities (5 km/h, 7 km/h, 8 km/h, 8.5 km/h). Except for the 2nd peak of the vertical ground reaction force, NW results in higher loading rates and horizontal forces as well as higher pronation and pronation velocity values as compared with W. Wrist acceleration values up to 7.6 times gravitational acceleration were recorded in NW. Compared with R at the same speeds (8 km/h and 8.5 km/h), NW can be recommended as low impact sport with 36% lower loading rates and 59% lower pronation velocities. However, the high wrist accelerations in NW reveal that the upper extremities are exposed to considerable repetitive shocks, which may cause overuse injuries of the upper extremities. Thus, additional preventive exercises for the upper limb muscles are recommended as well as using shock absorbing walking poles.

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Cherice N. Hughes-Oliver, Kathryn A. Harrison, D.S. Blaise Williams III and Robin M. Queen

Limb symmetry during athletic tasks, such as running and landing, and its association with injury has received limited attention in the literature. Limb symmetry (or asymmetry) is evaluated using varied forms of analyses that evaluate differences in movement kinetics or kinematics at discrete

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James J. Hannigan, Louis R. Osternig and Li-Shan Chou

Weak hip strength, particularly in the hip abductors and external rotators, is considered a risk factor for several running-related injuries, including patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) 1 – 6 and iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS). 7 In addition, females with PFPS have displayed greater hip

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Kristin D. Morgan

represents a ratio of muscle strength between the reconstructed and nonreconstructed limb, is commonly used to make rehabilitation and return-to-sport decisions. 4 , 5 To progress to running during rehabilitation, it is preferred that individuals exhibit at least 85% quadriceps strength in their

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Romuald Lepers, Paul J. Stapley and Thomas Cattagni

Age-related changes in performance affect all sport disciplines from sprinting to endurance events. 1 , 2 For swimming and running, previous research has shown that performance decrements with age are greater for endurance events than for sprinting events. 3 – 5 However, the reasons that exercise

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Matthew I. Black, Joseph C. Handsaker, Sam J. Allen, Stephanie E. Forrester and Jonathan P. Folland

Distance-running performance is dependent on the speed that can be sustained for the duration of an event. This speed is determined by the interaction of several physiological factors 1 that include maximal rate of oxygen uptake ( V ˙ O 2 max ), anaerobic capacity, fractional utilization of V ˙ O