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Whitney B. Curry, Symeon Dagkas and Marcia Wilson

Background:

The Newman’s Every Child a Sports Person (NECaSP) intervention aspires to increase sport and physical activity (PA) participation among young people in the United Kingdom. The aims of this article are to report on a summative process evaluation of the NECaSP and make recommendations for future interventions.

Methods:

Seventeen schools provided data from students aged 11 to 13 years (n = 1226), parents (n = 192), and teachers (n = 14) via direct observation and questionnaires. Means, SDs, and percentages were calculated for sociodemographic data. Qualitative data were analyzed via directed content analysis and main themes identified.

Results:

Findings indicate further administrative, educational, and financial support will help facilitate the success of the program in improving PA outcomes for young people and of other similar intervention programs globally. Data highlighted the need to engage parents to increase the likelihood of intervention success.

Conclusions:

One main strength of this study is the mixed-methods nature of the process evaluation. It is recommended that future school-based interventions that bridge sports clubs and formal curriculum provision should consider a broader approach to the delivery of programs throughout the academic year, school week, and school day. Finally, changes in the school curriculum can be successful once all parties are involved (community, school, families).

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Valter C. Barbosa Filho, Kelly Samara da Silva, Jorge Mota, Carmem Beck and Adair da Silva Lopes

Background:

Promoting physical activity (PA) in low- and middle-income countries is an important public health topic as well as a challenge for practice. This study aimed to assess the effect of a school-based intervention on different PA-related variables among students.

Methods:

This cluster-randomized-controlled trial included 548 students in the intervention group and 537 in the control group (11–18 years-old) from 6 schools in neighborhoods with low Human Development Index (0.170–0.491) in Fortaleza, Brazil. The intervention included strategies focused on training teachers, opportunities for PA in the school environment and health education. Variables measured at baseline and again at the 4-months follow-up included the weekly time in different types of moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), preference for PA during leisure-time, PA behavioral change stage and active commuting to school. Generalized linear models and binary logistic regressions were used.

Results:

An intervention effect was found by increasing the weekly time in MVPA (effect size = 0.17), popular games (effect size = 0.35), and the amount of PA per week (effect size = 0.27) among students (all P < .05).

Conclusions:

The intervention was effective in promoting improvements in some PA outcomes, but the changes were not sufficient to increase the proportion of those meeting PA recommendations.

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Markus V. Nahas, Mauro V. G. de Barros, Maria Alice A. de Assis, Pedro C. Hallal, Alex A. Florindo and Lisandra Konrad

Background:

A cross-cultural, randomized study was proposed to observe the effects of a school-based intervention designed to promote physical activity and healthy eating among high school students in 2 cities from different regions in Brazil: Recife and Florianopolis. The objective of this article is to describe the methodology and subjects enrolled in the project.

Methods:

Ten schools from each region were matched and randomized into intervention and control conditions. A questionnaire and anthropometry were used to collect data in the first and last month of the 2006 school year. The sample (n = 2155 at baseline; 55.7% females; 49.1% in the experimental group) included students 15 to 24 years, attending nighttime classes. The intervention focused on simple environmental/organizational changes, diet and physical activity education, and personnel training.

Results:

The central aspects of the intervention have been implemented in all 10 intervention schools. Problems during the intervention included teachers’ strikes in both sites and lack of involvement of the canteen owners in schools.

Conclusions:

The Saude na Boa study provides evidence that public high schools in Brazil represent an important environment for health promotion. Its design and simple measurements increase the chances of it being sustained and disseminated to similar schools in Brazil.

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Lauren McMichan, Ann-Marie Gibson and David A. Rowe

– 13 School-based interventions have been shown to increase moderate to vigorous PA 8 , 9 and VO 2max (a measure of cardiovascular fitness) and have also had a positive effect on television viewing (a proxy measure of SB), 6 yet some reviews have found inconclusive evidence that such interventions

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João Martins, Adilson Marques, Nuno Loureiro, Francisco Carreiro da Costa, José Diniz and Margarida Gaspar de Matos

sectors, such as families, health care providers, community organizations, government agencies, and schools, are needed. 4 , 32 The fundamental role that schools can play in promoting active lifestyles has been acknowledged. 36 , 37 Overall, school-based interventions to increase preadolescent and

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Xihe Zhu and Justin A. Haegele

, et al., 2009 ). In addition, Zapata et al. ( 2008 ) identified health-related fitness knowledge deficiencies as a factor that influences the rising prevalence of overweight and obesity in children. School-based interventions, and, more specifically, those situated in physical education programs, are

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Rebecca M. Dagger, Ian G. Davies, Kelly A. Mackintosh, Genevieve L. Stone, Keith P. George, Stuart J. Fairclough and Lynne M. Boddy

. Effect of a school-based intervention to promote healthy lifestyles in 7–11 year old children . Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act . 2009 ; 6 : 5 . PubMed doi:10.1186/1479-5868-6-5 10.1186/1479-5868-6-5 19154622 19. Gortmaker SL , Peterson K , Wiecha J , Sobol AM , Dixit S , Fox MK , Laird N

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Kent A. Lorenz, Hans van der Mars, Pamela Hodges Kulinna, Barbara E. Ainsworth and Melbourne F. Hovell

outside the control of the researchers, and that environmental modifications at the school level (eg, class walks) can influence MVPA for girls and boys during lunch sessions. Similar to other school-based interventions, boys were more active than girls when providing increased access and equipment to

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Darla M. Castelli and Ang Chen

fundamental problems, especially those related to samples, sampling, and intervention flexibility associated with RCT designs. Most school-based intervention studies are longitudinal and require randomization with control conditions for findings to be robust ( U.S. Department of Education, 2003 ). Given these

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Geraldine Naughton, David Greene, Daniel Courteix and Adam Baxter-Jones

analysis 10 years following initial scanning of young gymnasts ( 6 ); 4 years of observations involving vigorous physical activity in healthy young individuals ( 8 ); 1 year after the cessation of a school-based intervention in a peripubertal group of males and females ( 15 ); and after 9 months of