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Haylee U. Mercado and John Grady

management curriculum or classroom. Contribution to Teaching Body of Knowledge There are two methods of concept delivery that prevail in sport management programs that are particularly effective when thinking about teaching ES in the sport management classroom. The first method is to provide specific courses

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Jon R. Poole and George Graham

This study was designed to be an initial step toward a better understanding of how graduate teaching assistants teach their courses and the influences that shape their teaching decisions. The purposes included gaining insights into internal models that guided their teaching and describing the influence of an induction program on these internal models. A multi-case-study approach was employed to construct individual portraits. These portraits revealed that internal models were developed primarily from past experience as athletes, students, and teachers. Teaching could best be portrayed as a “pedagogy of contentment.” That is, teaching assistants were generally satisfied with their own teaching and did not perceive a need for additional improvement. Reported satisfaction was based on their belief that they already knew the different strategies, methods, and routines for teaching their particular subject.

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Zachary Wahl-Alexander and Matthew D. Curtner-Smith

& Siedentop, 1999 ; Jones, 1992 ; Silverman, 1991 ). At the center of this paradigm are the desire to determine how order and cooperation are established in classrooms and gymnasia and the notion that teaching consists of a series of tasks. Additionally, the extent to which students complete tasks is

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Jian Wang, Bo Shen, Xiaobin Luo, Qingshan Hu and Alex C. Garn

Motivation has long been considered as a key factor influencing teaching and learning ( Chen & Ennis, 2004 ). According to Pintrich ( 1999 ), motivation is the process in which “goal-directed activity is instigated and sustained” (p. 4). Many education researchers (e.g., Deci & Ryan, 2002 ; Shen

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Jence A. Rhoads, Marcos Daou, Keith R. Lohse and Matthew W. Miller

( McKeachie & Kulik, 1975 ). The notion that teaching facilitates the teacher’s learning has been a long accepted assumption in education. Bargh and Schul ( 1980 ) sought to investigate the cognitive benefits of teaching for the teacher. They proposed three stages of the teaching process: (1) preparation for

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Sarpreet Kahlon, Kiah Brubacher-Cressman, Erica Caron, Keren Ramonov, Ruth Taubman, Katherine Berg, F. Virginia Wright and Alicia J. Hilderley

. Program delivery Cocreate session content with participant. Adopt an autonomy-supportive teaching style. Use teaching strategies to break down movements. Provide feedback on technique. Tailor feedback to participant preferences. Prompt self-reflection. Link practiced activities to goals. Theme 1: “World

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Angela Lumpkin and Rebecca M. Achen

Despite what many claim, just because there is teaching does not mean there is learning. Clear and convincing evidence supports changing the instructional paradigm to a learner-centered classroom. Flipping a class shifts the delivery, often through technologically presented lectures, to free class time for student participation in a plethora of learning activities, such as think-pair-share and discussions, leading to student perceptions of greater learning and more enjoyment. In an action research approach with one class, 72% of juniors and seniors in an undergraduate sport finance and economics class reported out-of-class lectures often positively impacted their learning, and the remaining 28% responded these lectures did sometimes. End-of-course evaluations and surveys were overwhelmingly positive about class engagement, interaction, and enjoyment.

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Julia Walsh and Fraser Carson

with appropriately structured situational learning experiences that are similar across the world. For example, in the education of future lawyers Socratic questioning is a pedagogical approach that teaches students to think like a lawyer, in medicine the bedside teaching in clinical rounds teaches

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Ben D. Kern, Kim C. Graber, Amelia Mays Woods and Tom Templin

The process of teachers making pedagogical change in varying contexts is commonly referred to as teacher change ( Guskey, 2014 ). Pedagogical change is defined as alterations in “instructional resources, teaching approaches, and beliefs about pedagogy theory” ( Fullan, 2007 , p. 30). Teacher change

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Nina Verma, Robert C. Eklund, Calum A. Arthur, Timothy C. Howle and Ann-Marie Gibson

; Howle, Jackson, Conroy, & Dimmock, 2015 ), which we propose may be shaped by school-based physical education (PE) teachers’ use of transformational teaching behavior ( Beauchamp et al., 2010 ). A recent review has highlighted the potential effectiveness of school-based interventions underpinned by