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Philippe Romand and Nathalie Pantaléon

The purpose of this study was to attain a deeper understanding of youth coaches’ attitudes toward the display of moral character (e.g., the values they try to teach their players, the concrete means they use to teach game rules, and prosocial norms) and to examine how they make rule abidance compatible with intensive efforts to achieve success. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 16 coaches of adolescent rugby teams. The interviews dealt with how values are taught to players and how rule following is enforced during practice and competition. A lexical analysis (Alceste software) and a thematic analysis were performed on the interview answers. The findings illustrate the complexity of the coaching role—coaches must impart a certain number of rules and ways of acting to their athletes while simultaneously inciting them to a high performance level that can lead players to go overboard in competitive situations.

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Nicole M. LaVoi, Erin Becker and Heather D. Maxwell

Given the lack of nationalized and required coach education programs for those involved with youth sports, self-help coaching books are a common source of knowledge. With the exception of critiques of young adult sports fiction (Kane, 1998; Kreigh & Kane, 1997), sport media research has lacked investigation of mediums that impact non-elite youth athletes and adolescent girls, and youth coaches and parents of young female athletes. The purpose of this study is to examine ‘coaching girls’ books–specifically how differences between female and male athletes are constructed. A content analysis was performed on selective chapters within a criterion sampling of six best-selling, self-help ‘coaching girls’ books. Results indicate coaching girls books are written from a perspective of inflated gender difference, and represent a simplified, stereo-typed account of coaching girls. Four first-order themes emerged from analysis: Problematizing Coaching Girls, Girls Constructed As “Other,” Ambivalence, and Sustaining the Gender Binary. Implications of these themes are discussed.

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Maureen R. Weiss and Becky L. Sisley

The present study examined the problem of coaching attrition in youth sports by asking former coaches why they quit. Also, dropout and current coaches were compared on demographic characteristics, coaching orientations, self-ratings of coaching abilities, and attitudes toward program policies. Current (n = 159) and dropout (n = 97) coaches associated with a youth sports agency responded to a background questionnaire and a coaching orientations and preferred outcomes questionnaire. Dropout coaches also completed a questionnaire to assess the reasons why they quite coaching. Multiple reasons were cited: time involvement, conflicts with job, child no longer participating, loss of motivation, problems with unqualified officiating, and dissatisfaction with program philosophy. Current and dropout coaches were similar on demographic characteristics and coaching orientations but differed on preferred coaching outcomes. Recommendations for retaining youth coaches, and thus coaching continuity for the kids, included enhancing the quality of officiating, providing coaching clinics, and soliciting input from coaches and parents regarding program philosophy and policies.

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M. Ryan Flett, Daniel Gould, Katherine R. Griffes and Larry Lauer

The following study explored coaching behaviors and youth coaches’ justifications for their actions by comparing more effective and less effective coaches from an underserved setting. Reasons for their coaching behaviors were also explored. In-depth interviews and ethnographic observations were conducted with 12 coaches from 6 different youth sports. Support for each theme from the analysis was compared between the 6 more effective and 6 less effective coaches. Less effective coaches tried to create a sense of family within the team, but used very negative, militaristic coaching strategies that were not developmentally appropriate. Less effective coaches justified the negative approach because of the perceived dangers in the inner city and attempted to toughen their players through harsher methods. More effective coaches challenged players while being supportive, attempted to develop close relationships along with a positive team climate, and promoted autonomy and the transfer of life skills from sport to life. More effective coaches appeared to be more open to coach training and others’ ideas—they could be described as lifelong learners. The results from this study not only reveal how more and less effective coaches differ, but provide possible insight as to why they differ. The study provides unique insights for researchers and coaching educators interested in particularly underserved settings and in developing less effective coaches.

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Anna Stodter and Christopher J. Cushion

-appropriate youth coach education course, part of a new national youth-specific coaching qualification pathway. The research reported here forms part of a wider project that evaluated the impact of this course on coaches’ learning. Participants Following institutional ethics approval, three full-time professional

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Nicholas D. Myers, Sung Eun Park, Soyeon Ahn, Seungmin Lee, Philip J. Sullivan and Deborah L. Feltz

 < .001 for character building; r DZRT  = .16 ( r IZRT  = .15), p  < .001 for game strategy; r DZRT  = .13 ( r IZRT  = .13), p  < .001 for motivation; and r DZRT  = .10 ( r IZRT  = .10), p  = .005 for technique. For youth coaches, the overall relationship between the proposed sources of coaching

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Marty K. Baker, Jeffrey A. Graham, Allison Smith and Zachary T. Smith

youth who are curious and love the game, but also building on this to generate talented and skillful players who will contribute to the national team in future generations. Practical suggestions and delivery tips The German materials encourage youth coaches to focus primarily on letting participants

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INTERNATIONAL SPORT COACHING JOURNAL

DIGEST VOLUME 5, Issue #3

key areas were problematized: pursuing personal development and performance success, creating a task-oriented environment, and implementing autonomy-supportive behaviors. This paper offers a set of key practical implications for elite youth coaches. Likewise, the paper provides relevant insights for

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Zackary S. Cicone, Oleg A. Sinelnikov and Michael R. Esco

populations, as the physiological mechanisms underpinning the cardiovascular response to aerobic exercise have been shown to be different between adolescents and adults ( 14 , 25 ). Given the ubiquity of MHR usage by youth coaches and trainers for prescribing exercise intensity, monitoring athletes during

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Fernando Santos, Martin Camiré, Dany J. MacDonald, Henrique Campos, Manuel Conceição and Ana Silva

five years to maintain their certification. The researchers, in collaboration with the Portuguese Hockey Federation ( 2015 ), created an online PYD-focused CEC entitled “Integrating PYD within Coach Education for Youth Coaches”. The PYD-focused CEC was created based on best practices derived from the