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Sheena S. Philip, Joy C. Macdermid, Saranya Nair, Dave Walton and Ruby Grewal

postmenopausal women . Osteoporosis International, 13 ( 10 ), 824 – 828 . PubMed ID: 12378372 doi:10.1007/s001980200114 10.1007/s001980200114 Keegan , T. ( 2004 ). Characteristics of fallers who fracture at the foot, distal forearm, proximal humerus, pelvis, and shaft of the tibia/fibula compared with

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Pablo A. Domene, Michelle Stanley and Glykeria Skamagki

), muscle or tendon (eg, rupture, strain, tear), nerve (eg, numbness, pins and needles), and other. The following 12 exclusive categories were used to code injury location 3 , 20 : ankle and foot, back and pelvis, chest, forearm and wrist, hand, head and neck, hip, knee, lower leg and Achilles tendon

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Kornelius Kraus, Elisabeth Kraus, Boris Gojanovic and Francois Fourchet

-reliable Kinovea software (version 0.8.15) (ICC = 0.99). 17 Tasks Two movement tasks were utilized in the study: an active and a passive SLR. The active and passive SLR evaluate the mobility of the dorsal kinetic chain while maintaining a stable pelvis, core, and active extension of the opposite leg 1 (Figure  1

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Connor Burk, Jesse Perry, Sam Lis, Steve Dischiavi and Chris Bleakley

, consisting of the plantar fascia, Achilles tendon, gastrocnemius, hamstrings, sacrotuberous ligament, and erector spina. 3 It is proposed that the anatomical integration of the superficial back line facilitates effective force transmission between the spine, pelvis, legs, and arms. 4 This is supported by

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Jessica G. Hunter, Alexander M.B. Smith, Lena M. Sciarratta, Stephen Suydam, Jae Kun Shim and Ross H. Miller

the pelvis (iliac crests, anterior superior iliac spines, posterior superior iliac spines, and sacrum); lower extremity of the dominant leg, defined as the leg used to kick a soccer ball (greater trochanter, 4-marker thigh cluster, lateral and medial epicondyles, fibula, shank, and lateral and medial

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Landon Lempke, Rebecca Wilkinson, Caitlin Murray and Justin Stanek

repetitions of hamstring isometric contractions for 6 s followed by relaxation for 5 s), or (3) control group. All interventions were applied to the hamstrings once. Subjects were positioned supine on a treatment table with the nontested thigh and pelvis attached to the table with velcro. Active knee

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Francesco Campa, Federico Spiga and Stefania Toselli

. Get-up post to high pelvis bridge isolations 2 20 s 30 With arms behind the back, plant both palms on the ground with the fingers pointed backward and off to the side. Bend one leg and extend the other. Begin to bridge with the leg that is in the flexed position, moving the hips up toward the ceiling

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Vincent Shieh, Ashwini Sansare, Minal Jain, Thomas Bulea, Martina Mancini and Cris Zampieri

inertial sensors). Increased hip strategy leads to greater accelerations of the pelvis at greater velocities, resulting in increased acceleration-based parameters but not necessarily COP. Moreover, balance strategies may not be completely developed, as visual and vestibular afferent systems reach adult

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Siobhán O’Connor, Conor Bruce, Calvin Teahan, Elaine McDermott and Enda Whyte

.72–11.00)  Ribs and chest 0 0 (0–0) –  Upper back and thoracic spine 0 0 (0–0) –  Lower back 1 1.27 (1.24–1.29) 4.41 (2.84–6.83)  Pelvis 1 1.27 (1.24–1.29) 1.54 (0.74–3.24)  Buttock 1 1.27 (1.24–1.29) 1.98 (1.03–3.81) Lower limb 53 67.09 (66.89–67.29) 276.17 (261.30–291.90)  Hip 2 2.53 (2.49–2.57) 9.26 (6

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Scott W. Cheatham, Kyle R. Stull and Morey J. Kolber

knee could no longer be passively moved without providing overpressure. 42 – 44 The ROM measurement was then taken by the examiner. The examiner monitored for any compensatory movement through the lower-extremity and pelvis. This testing technique was chosen as it replicated the same hip position and