Search Results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 2,897 items for :

Clear All
Restricted access

Leighton Jones, Jasmin C. Hutchinson and Elizabeth M. Mullin

renewed awareness of the role that affective responses to exercise might have in determining longer term adherence ( Ekkekakis, 2017 ; Ekkekakis & Dafermos, 2012 ). This awareness has, in part, been heightened by a number of studies that have demonstrated a link between acute affective responses to

Restricted access

Ali Al-Yaaribi and Maria Kavussanu

because these behaviors are more likely to have achievement-related consequences for the recipient, and we investigated their direct and indirect relationships (through affect) with two important outcomes: task cohesion and burnout. Prosocial Behavior Although much research has examined antecedents of

Restricted access

Aditi Mankad and Sandy Gordon

Context:

Grief can be a common psychological characteristic of long-term injury, but few athletes are taught how to effectively deal with these intense emotions.

Objective:

To examine the effectiveness of Pennebaker's standard writing paradigm in improving athletes' psychological response to injury after engaging in written disclosure.

Design:

Repeated-measures design with 6 data-collection time points.

Setting:

Sport-injury clinics.

Participants:

9 elite long-term-injured athletes.

Measures and Intervention:

Participants were administered the Psychological Responses to Sport Injury Inventory and the Rehabilitation Beliefs Survey at 3 times preintervention and postintervention. Intervention comprised three 20-min writing sessions. Linguistic analyses were carried out using the Linguistic Inquiry Word Count to determine whether changes in word categories would be associated with postintervention changes in grief characteristics and rehabilitation-belief subscales.

Results:

There were significant differences in athletes' grief characteristics postintervention, with athletes feeling less devastated, dispirited, cheated, and restless by their injury and increasing the reorganization of their thoughts. Corresponding evidence from text analyses further supported these changes, with athletes linguistically demonstrating that they were actively working through their grief-related response using improved cognitive processing (F 2,16 = 5.15, P = .019, η2 = .39) and the disinhibition of positive and negative affect (F 2,16 = 4.05, P = .038, η2 = .34). There were no significant changes in athletes' rehabilitation beliefs, which remained high throughout the testing period.

Conclusions:

Overall, the findings demonstrated that written emotional disclosure was effective in enhancing psychological rehabilitation by contributing to a greater personal understanding of the injury event and attenuating athletes' grief-related response.

Restricted access

Jennifer Brunet, Eva Guérin and Nicolas Speranzini

researchers have shown that participating in physical activity and exercise can induce feel-good experiences (for reviews, see Berger & Motl, 2000 ; Reed & Ones, 2006 ). For example, Daley and Welch ( 2004 ) reported an association between short bouts of exercise and improved affective experiences. Moreover

Restricted access

Stacey Alvarez-Alvarado, Graig M. Chow, Nicole T. Gabana, Robert C. Hickner and Gershon Tenenbaum

). Simultaneously, psychological states such as attention, effort perceptions, and affect are activated to enable efficient physiological and physical adaptation to the physical demands ( Balagué, Hristovski, García, Aguirre, et al., 2015 ; Ekkekakis, Lind, & Vazou, 2010 ; Hutchinson & Tenenbaum, 2007 ; Meir et

Restricted access

Ian D. Boardley, Ben Jackson and Alexander Simmons

This research aimed to investigate (a) the effect of golfers’ perceptions of coach motivation efficacy on golfers’ precompetition task self-efficacy, (b) the effect of performance on pre-to-postround changes in self-efficacy, (c) the effect of pre-to-postround changes in self-efficacy on pre-to-postround changes in affect and emotion, and (d) whether any effects of performance on pre-to-postcompetition changes in affect and emotion were mediated by pre-to-postcompetition changes in self-efficacy. In Study 1, a scale measuring golf self-efficacy was developed and validated using data from 197 golfers. In Study 2, 200 golfers completed this measure alongside measures of coach motivation efficacy, and positive and negative affect before a golf competition; all measures (except coach motivation efficacy) were again completed following the competition. Structural equation modeling showed that coach motivation efficacy positively predicted precompetition self-efficacy, performance positively predicted pre-to-postcompetition changes in self-efficacy, which had positive and negative effects, respectively, on pre-to-postcompetition changes in positive and negative affect; mediation analyses demonstrated that pre-to-postcompetition changes in self-efficacy mediated effects of performance on pre-to-postcompetition changes in positive and negative affect. In Study 3, the Study-2 procedures were replicated with a separate sample of 212 golfers, except measures of excitement, concentration disruption, somatic anxiety, and worry replaced those for positive and negative affect. Structural analyses showed the findings from Study 2 were largely replicated when specific emotions were investigated in place of general indices of affect. This investigation makes novel contributions regarding the potential importance of perceptions of coach efficacy for golfers’ own efficacy beliefs, and the role personal efficacy beliefs may play in facilitating the effects of performance on affective outcomes.

Restricted access

K. Andrew R. Richards, Nicholas Washburn and Ye Hoon Lee

conceptual model for understanding the relationships among POS, emotional labor, affective commitment, and job satisfaction in in-service physical educators (Figure  1 ). These constructs can be explored through affective events theory (AET; Weiss & Cropanzano, 1996 ), which highlights the role of workplace

Restricted access

Chih-Hsiang Yang and David E. Conroy

). These findings point to the need for preventive interventions to help older adults alleviate negative affect, improve well-being, and in turn sustain better mental and physical health. Engaging in regular physical activity and mindfulness practice have both been introduced as promising strategies to

Restricted access

April Tripp and Terry L. Rizzo

This study assessed the affect of the label (i.e., CP) attached to a description of a child’s motor ability and teacher attributes on the variables of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TpB) on two groups of elementary teachers (label and no-label). Results from a Hotelling = s T2 MANOVA showed a labeling effect. Results from a simple linear regression procedure also showed that of the teacher attributes assessed, only perceived teaching competence (p < .01) predicted favorable intentions. Support for the TpB was demonstrated for the group with the label for the social normative component (p < .000). Further analyses showed that for the group that receive that label information, only the school principal (p < .05) was associated with favorable intentions.

Restricted access

Sarah J. Parker, Scott J. Strath and Ann M. Swartz

This study examined the relationship between physical activity (PA) and mental health among older adults as measured by objective and subjective PA-assessment instruments. Pedometers (PED), accelerometers (ACC), and the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) were administered to measure 1 week of PA among 84 adults age 55–87 (mean = 71) years. General mental health was measured using the Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS) and the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWL). Linear regressions revealed that PA estimated by PED significantly predicted 18.1%, 8.3%, and 12.3% of variance in SWL and positive and negative affect, respectively, whereas PA estimated by the PASE did not predict any mental health variables. Results from ACC data were mixed. Hotelling–William tests between correlation coefficients revealed that the relationship between PED and SWL was significantly stronger than the relationship between PASE and SWL. Relationships between PA and mental health might depend on the PA measure used.