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Diane M. Culver, Penny Werthner and Pierre Trudel

The focus of this paper is the Canadian National Coaching Certification Program (NCCP), a large-scale formal coach education programme. Beginning in the early 2000s, revisions to the programme have moved the NCCP from an instructor-centred to a learner-centred programme. Through an examination of

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Sebastián Feu, Javier García-Rubio, Antonio Antúnez and Sergio Ibáñez

chaotic and heterogeneous training of Spanish coaches that had been developed following the particular criteria of each sport discipline, unifying and regulating the coacheseducation ( Feu & Ibáñez, 2001 ). This Royal Decree organized sport education in three training levels, regulating the entrance

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Kristen D. Dieffenbach and Valerie Wayda

Among the physical activity, exercise and health related academic disciplines, coaching education remains an under-developed field. Once closely aligned with physical education, coaching education has remained practically immobile despite the activity and growth in the related functional fitness and sport performance fields of exercise and sport sciences such as sport pedagogy, exercise physiology, and sport and exercise psychology. This article provides a historical context for the evolution of the academic discipline of coaching education within the broader field of physical education and a brief overview of coaching education as it exists within academia today. Recommendations and suggestions are made for the future growth and development of the coaching education discipline.

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Ryszard Panfil, Marcin Krawczynski, Piotr Marek and Lukasz Panfil

The purpose of this paper is to describe the current status of coaching and coach education in Poland. Currently, the dynamics of legal rulers that govern the sport coaching market in Poland are dictated by several broader phenomena, such as the globalisation of sport culture, European integration, decentralisation of power and deregulation of the labour market that has been occurring over recent years. The coaching labour market, which is determined by various needs of institutions and individuals, points to appropriate forms and methods of education for coaches. This new situation allows us to specify coaching roles and respective competences that are adapted to the dynamic needs of the market. It also allows Polish sport associations and “Akademia Trenerska” (“Coaching Academy”) to actively and innovatively stimulate the sport coaching labour market in Poland.

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Michel Milistetd, Pierre Trudel, Isabel Mesquita and Juarez Vieira do Nascimento

In Brazil, contrary to the situation in many countries, sport coaching at all levels is considered a profession. Following a law passed by the government, those who want to coach are required to earn a university diploma called a ‘Bachelor in Physical Education’. This bachelor’s degree prepares future professionals to work in any of the following areas: health, leisure, and sport performance. Because universities have some fexibility regarding the courses that they offer and can also focus on one or any combination of the three aforementioned areas, we cannot assume that graduate students have acquired the same knowledge and developed the same competencies. Therefore, a broad inquiry of what is provided by different universities was needed to create a picture of the curriculum that future sport coaches will experience. In an effort to situate the Brazilian coaching and coach education system within a worldwide perspective, the data collected are interpreted using the International Sport Coaching Framework (ISCF).

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Guylaine Demers, Andrea J. Woodburn and Claude Savard

This article discusses the development of a university undergraduate competencybased coach education program in Canada, namely the Baccalaureate in Sport Intervention (BIS) at Laval University in Quebec City. It addresses program development in three phases: (a) design (b) implementation, and (c) evaluation. It discusses how decisions made regarding the program relate to current research on coaching, coach education, and sport psychology. This article offers an example of how competency-based training for coach education can be implemented within a university setting in a way that addresses some of the primary concerns in the literature on coach education.

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Ashley E. Stirling

Coach education is the key to improved coaching. In order for coach education initiatives to be effective though, the conceptualization of those initiatives must be developed based on empirical learning theory. It is suggested that Kolb’s theory of experiential learning may be an appropriate learning theory to apply to coach education. This paper outlines how Kolb’s theory of experiential learning was used in the development of Canada’s National Coaching Certification Program coach education module entitled “Empower +: Creating Positive and Healthy Sport Experiences.” The module is summarized briefly, and Kolb’s six key tenets of experiential learning are reviewed. Applications of each tenet within the coach education module are highlighted, and recommendations are made for future evaluation and research.

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Bettina Callary, Diane Culver, Penny Werthner and John Bales

High quality education programs across the globe could help coaching move forward as a profession. Although there have been suggestions to improve sports coaching education programs by integrating theory and practice through alternative learning approaches such as mentoring and critical refection (Armour, 2010; Cushion, Armour, & Jones, 2003), it is unclear whether such approaches have been implemented in coach education programs and how different countries are educating their coaches. The purpose of this paper is to describe how seven high performance coach education programs are educating coaches and to what extent they are employing alternative learning approaches. The goals, curricula, and pedagogical approaches are described and implications for the professionalization of coaching are discussed.

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Vladislav A. Bespomoshchnov and Leonid V. Mikhno

The purpose of article is to provide an overview of coaching and coach education in Russia with a focus on ice hockey coaching. The coach education system in Russia is in a transitional stage. Previously, it was a threestage model: Baccalaureate Degree, Specialist Degree and Master’s Degree in any sport (Mikhno, Vinokurov, & Maryanovich, 2004). However, a law created by The Ministry of Sport (2014) delegated the establishment of a coaching certification system to each of the sports federations. The Russian Ice Hockey Federation (RIHF) proposed a 4-level license system. The N.G. Puchkov’s Ice Hockey Coaching Academy is the modern school for ice hockey coaches, which has evolved from Tarasov’s Higher Education School for Ice Hockey Coaches. Anatoly Tarasov is the Russian ice hockey coach who developed the system in the 1920s when ice hockey was first introduced to the USSR. Ice hockey coach education in Russia is gradually developing every year.

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Melissa Murray

Online learning has grown at a rapid pace in the last decade (Allen & Seaman, 2005). The purpose of this paper is to present some of the most recent technologies associated with online coaching education in academic settings. The effectiveness of the online learning environment is controversial (USDOE, 2009; Jaggars & Bailey, 2010). Therefore, it is critical to examine strategies that can be used to ensure learning outcomes. A series of tips for online educators are offered. Multiple tools for educators, including blogs, wikis, Google Cloud, instant messaging and YouTube are discussed in relation to possible course assignments within a coaching education curriculum. The paper concludes with a few suggestions for educating large groups.