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Colin J. Lewis, Simon J. Roberts, Hazel Andrews and Rebecca Sawiuk

), formal coach education is framed as a predominantly male-dominated preserve, where women continue to present and negotiate their gendered identities along a path of both acceptance and resistance ( Norman, Rankin-Wright, & Allison, 2018 ). More recently, coach education has been described as a harsh and

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Fiona Chambers and Robin Gregg

This paper highlights the status of coaching and coach education policy and practice on the island of Ireland. The island of Ireland represents a unique setting as it comprises a hybrid jurisdiction of (a) the United Kingdom and Northern Ireland and (b) the Republic of Ireland. A historical and sociopolitical backdrop provides insight into how key agencies develop coaching and coach education policy and practice in a highly complex dual environment. A five-step meta-synthesis process of data collection and analysis revealed key policy and practice issues on the island relating to (a) the coaching workforce and (b) coach education system.

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Diane M. Culver, Penny Werthner and Pierre Trudel

The focus of this paper is the Canadian National Coaching Certification Program (NCCP), a large-scale formal coach education programme. Beginning in the early 2000s, revisions to the programme have moved the NCCP from an instructor-centred to a learner-centred programme. Through an examination of

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Sebastián Feu, Javier García-Rubio, Antonio Antúnez and Sergio Ibáñez

chaotic and heterogeneous training of Spanish coaches that had been developed following the particular criteria of each sport discipline, unifying and regulating the coacheseducation ( Feu & Ibáñez, 2001 ). This Royal Decree organized sport education in three training levels, regulating the entrance

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Jonathon Edwards, Diane Culver, Ross Leadbetter, Kate Kloos and Luke Potwarka

coach education system, where relationships are created and maintained between these stakeholders as a means of accomplishing a common goal for the system ( Edwards & Leadbetter, 2016 ; Robbins, Coulter, & Langton, 2006 ). What makes these relationships imperative is that each stakeholder has a

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Pierre Trudel, Michel Milestetd and Diane M. Culver

an umbrella term for inquiry into sports coaching and sport coach education ( Nelson, Groom, & Potrac, 2014 ). For the 20-year period from 1980–1999, this returned 112 results; for the 6 year periods of 2000–2005, 2006–2011, and 2012–2017, the results were, respectively, 120, 177, and 315

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Kristen D. Dieffenbach and Valerie Wayda

Among the physical activity, exercise and health related academic disciplines, coaching education remains an under-developed field. Once closely aligned with physical education, coaching education has remained practically immobile despite the activity and growth in the related functional fitness and sport performance fields of exercise and sport sciences such as sport pedagogy, exercise physiology, and sport and exercise psychology. This article provides a historical context for the evolution of the academic discipline of coaching education within the broader field of physical education and a brief overview of coaching education as it exists within academia today. Recommendations and suggestions are made for the future growth and development of the coaching education discipline.

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Ryszard Panfil, Marcin Krawczynski, Piotr Marek and Lukasz Panfil

The purpose of this paper is to describe the current status of coaching and coach education in Poland. Currently, the dynamics of legal rulers that govern the sport coaching market in Poland are dictated by several broader phenomena, such as the globalisation of sport culture, European integration, decentralisation of power and deregulation of the labour market that has been occurring over recent years. The coaching labour market, which is determined by various needs of institutions and individuals, points to appropriate forms and methods of education for coaches. This new situation allows us to specify coaching roles and respective competences that are adapted to the dynamic needs of the market. It also allows Polish sport associations and “Akademia Trenerska” (“Coaching Academy”) to actively and innovatively stimulate the sport coaching labour market in Poland.

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Michel Milistetd, Pierre Trudel, Isabel Mesquita and Juarez Vieira do Nascimento

In Brazil, contrary to the situation in many countries, sport coaching at all levels is considered a profession. Following a law passed by the government, those who want to coach are required to earn a university diploma called a ‘Bachelor in Physical Education’. This bachelor’s degree prepares future professionals to work in any of the following areas: health, leisure, and sport performance. Because universities have some fexibility regarding the courses that they offer and can also focus on one or any combination of the three aforementioned areas, we cannot assume that graduate students have acquired the same knowledge and developed the same competencies. Therefore, a broad inquiry of what is provided by different universities was needed to create a picture of the curriculum that future sport coaches will experience. In an effort to situate the Brazilian coaching and coach education system within a worldwide perspective, the data collected are interpreted using the International Sport Coaching Framework (ISCF).

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Guylaine Demers, Andrea J. Woodburn and Claude Savard

This article discusses the development of a university undergraduate competencybased coach education program in Canada, namely the Baccalaureate in Sport Intervention (BIS) at Laval University in Quebec City. It addresses program development in three phases: (a) design (b) implementation, and (c) evaluation. It discusses how decisions made regarding the program relate to current research on coaching, coach education, and sport psychology. This article offers an example of how competency-based training for coach education can be implemented within a university setting in a way that addresses some of the primary concerns in the literature on coach education.