Search Results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 369 items for :

  • "competitive" x
  • Social Studies in Sport and Physical Activity x
Clear All
Restricted access

Bik C. Chow

The purpose of the research was to study the transitional experiences of elite female athletes who are going through the process of athletic retirement. Using a life history approach, six former and six current athletes in Hong Kong were interviewed. Semi-structured interviews were utilized based on the Schlossberg’s (1981, 1984) transition model. Data were analyzed using typology and constant comparison methods. Diversity and commonality in the experiences of women withdrawing from elite sports competition were found. The life history approach was effective in illustrating the ways in which Hong Kong female athletes feel and think about career end, with a transition from competition to retirement evident as part of career passing. Content analysis of interviews revealed several salient themes related to sports retirement. Key distinctions across projected and experienced retirement were associated with a woman’s being an immigrant athlete, entering early into sport, and pursuing an education. Athlete status also affected transition to retirement and lifestyle after an elite sports career.

Restricted access

James Curtis and Richard Ennis

This paper compares findings from a survey of former Canadian Junior hockey players and results from a representative sample of males of the same age in the general population. The analyses test hypotheses derived from the argument that disengagement from elite-level sport leads to various stress-induced negative consequences. The three primary dependent variables, suggested by the previous literature, are measures of life satisfaction, employment status, and marital status. For these measures, there was no evidence of negative consequences of disengagement, even when the comparisons were controlled for time since disengagement. This conclusion was also supported by reports from the former players on their attitudes toward elite-level hockey and about their disengagement from the role of active player at this level. A possible exception was in the former players’ reports of feelings of loss at the time of disengagement. Relevant analyses are also reported for the extent of continued involvement in hockey in other than playing capacities. There were some effects of continued involvement upon attitudes toward hockey that suggest that involvement functions to limit attitudes of negativity. Theoretical implications of the findings are discussed.

Restricted access

John Amis, Narayan Pant and Trevor Slack

This study demonstrates that a recent development in the strategic management literature, the resource-based view of the firm, has great utility for furthering our understanding of sport sponsorship. The paper provides a theoretical framework to explain the application of the approach to sponsorship. Illustration and greater insight are then provided through the presentation of two case studies. These are used to identify the salient characteristics of agreements made by two international companies, each of which has been extensively involved in sport sponsorship but with varying degrees of success. The resource-based approach is used to demonstrate that the disparate returns of the companies' sponsorship investments could have been anticipated. As such, as well as providing a conceptual extension to the sponsorship literature, the paper also offers a route for more empirical analyses of potential sponsorship opportunities.

Restricted access

Pirkko Markula

separate spheres of dance and sport finding each other in the popular platforms of the individualized, health conscious, competitive, and commercialized (neo-liberal) culture? And if so, why now? With these questions in mind, this special section offers an opportunity to examine the cultural and social

Restricted access

Chad Seifried, Brian Soebbing and Kwame J.A. Agyemang

institutional field? 2 Third, how does a college football bowl game improve its standing in a competitive institutional field? Seifried and King touched on answers to these questions about bowl games when they alluded to the establishment of interorganiztional relationships as the main reason for college

Restricted access

Jenny McMahon, Camilla J. Knight and Kerry R. McGannon

) are undertaken to protect athletes. The meritocratic nature of competitive sport has come to normalize and even encourage excessive intensive training as a necessary means of achieving competitive performance ( McMahon, 2010 ; McMahon et al., 2012 ). However, normalized practices such as excessive