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Michael Girdwood, Liam West, David Connell and Peter Brukner

; a period of relative rest, followed by global gluteal strengthening before returning to running, and higher level sport. Askling et al 4 also described a subgroup of dancers with hamstring strains, sustained during slow-speed stretching. They reported 87% prevalence of QF tearing in this group

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Jeffrey G. Williams, Hannah I. Gard, Jeana M. Gregory, Amy Gibson and Jennifer Austin

demands of the sport requiring recurrent, explosive active and passive applications of tension in the hamstring muscle tissue. Previous research has been aimed at establishing the cause for hamstring strains and effective preventative measures. 4 , 5 This research has examined variables such as age

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. adductor strain b. ankle sprain c. hamstring strain d. hip flexor strain 13. Preseason YBT-LQ scores in a heterogeneous population of D-III collegiate athletes were associated with an increased risk of sport-related lower quadrant noncontact time-loss injury. a. True b. False 14. What was the average age

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Justin W.Y. Lee, Ming-Jing Cai, Patrick S.H. Yung and Kai-Ming Chan

Hamstring strain injuries (HSI) remain a significant concern in sports, because of the time period the athlete is unable to play the sport and a declined performance for the injured athlete. Due to HSI, 10% to 12% of players have missed training or a game. HSI is accounted for more than one

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Jason Brumitt, Jill Sikkema, Saiko Mair, CJ Zita, Victor Wilson and Jordan Petersen

; Range of Time Loss) Males (Frequency of Injury; Range of Time Loss) Torso Lumbar strain (1; 13) Hip Adductor strain (2; 4–12) Hip flexor strain (1; 5) Hip flexor strain (2; 6–21) Thigh Quadriceps strain (2; 3–9) Hamstring strain (5; 2–9) Hamstring strain (5; 8–22) Knee ACL sprain (3; 36–54) Meniscus

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Max Pietrzak and Niels B.J. Vollaard

Hamstring strain injury (HSI) is one of the most common noncontact injuries in athletes, 1 – 3 with high rates of recurrence, 4 despite considerable research efforts. 5 The role of hamstring flexibility, also termed extensibility herein, in HSI, 4 , 6 – 8 reinjury, and rehabilitation, 2 , 9

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Matthew D. DeLang, Mehdi Rouissi, Nicola L. Bragazzi, Karim Chamari and Paul A. Salamh

discrepancies increase the risk of hamstring strain in soccer players, indicating that a normalized strength profile, assessed within 10% of the contralateral limb, 61 – 63 may act as a protective mechanism against such injury risk. Consequently, general prevention programs and return-to-sport criteria would

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Mostafa Zarei, Hamed Abbasi, Abdolhamid Daneshjoo, Mehdi Gheitasi, Kamran Johari, Oliver Faude, Nikki Rommers and Roland Rössler

reduction in injury rate have been reported. 26 The beneficial effects of hamstring strength on injury reduction could be attributed to the stabilization of the knee joint during running, which is most important at high speeds to prevent hamstring strains. Also isokinetic strength of the hip and ankle

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Marcus J. Colby, Brian Dawson, Peter Peeling, Jarryd Heasman, Brent Rogalski, Michael K. Drew and Jordan Stares

M . Effect of high-speed running on hamstring strain injury risk . Br J Sports Med . 2016 ; 50 ( 24 ): 1536 – 1540 . PubMed ID: 27288515 doi:10.1136/bjsports-2015-095679 27288515 10.1136/bjsports-2015-095679 8. Hulin BT , Gabbett TJ , Blanch P , Chapman P , Bailey D , Orchard

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Billy T. Hulin, Tim J. Gabbett, Nathan J. Pickworth, Rich D. Johnston and David G. Jenkins

AJ , Williams MD , et al . The financial cost of hamstring strain injuries in the Australian Football League . Br J Sports Med . 2014 ; 48 ( 8 ): 729 – 730 . doi:10.1136/bjsports-2013-092884 10.1136/bjsports-2013-092884 24124035 3. Gabbett TJ . Debunking the myths about training load