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Leighton Jones, Costas I. Karageorghis and Panteleimon Ekkekakis

Theories suggest that external stimuli (e.g., auditory and visual) may be rendered ineffective in modulating attention when exercise intensity is high. We examined the effects of music and parkland video footage on psychological measures during and after stationary cycling at two intensities: 10% of maximal capacity below ventilatory threshold and 5% above. Participants (N = 34) were exposed to four conditions at each intensity: music only, video only, music and video, and control. Analyses revealed main effects of condition and exercise intensity for affective valence and perceived activation (p < .001), state attention (p < .05), and exercise enjoyment (p < .001). The music-only and music-and-video conditions led to the highest valence and enjoyment scores during and after exercise regardless of intensity. Findings indicate that attentional manipulations can exert a salient influence on affect and enjoyment even at intensities slightly above ventilatory threshold.

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Melissa J. Crowe, Anthony S. Leicht and Warwick L. Spinks

This study investigated the effects of caffeine on repeated, anaerobic exercise using a double-blind, randomized, crossover design. Seventeen subjects (five female) underwent cognitive (reaction time, number recall) and blood (glucose, potassium, catecholamines, lactate) testing before and after consuming caffeine (6 mg/kg), placebo, or nothing (control). An exercise test (two 60 s maximal cycling bouts) was conducted 90 min after caffeine/placebo consumption. Plasma caffeine concentrations significantly increased after caffeine ingestion, however, there were no positive effects on cognitive or blood parameters except a significant decrease in plasma potassium concentrations at rest. Potentially negative effects of caffeine included significantly higher blood lactate compared to control and significantly slower time to peak power in exercise bout 2 compared to control and placebo. Caffeine had no significant effect on peak power, work output, RPE, or peak heart rate. In conclusion, caffeine had no ergogenic effect on repeated, maximal cycling bouts and may be detrimental to anaerobic performance.

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Rachel Borne, Christophe Hausswirth and François Bieuzen

Purpose:

To investigate the effect of different limb blood-flow levels on cycling-performance recovery, blood lactate concentration, and heart rate.

Methods:

Thirty-three high-intensity intermittent-trained athletes completed two 30-s Wingate anaerobic test sessions, 3 × 30-s (WAnT 1–3) and 1 × 30-s (WAnT 4), on a cycling ergometer. WAnT 1–3 and WAnT 4 were separated by a randomly assigned 24-min recovery intervention selected from among blood-flow restriction, passive rest, placebo stimulation, or neuromuscular electrical-stimulation-induced blood flow. Calf arterial inflow was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography at regular intervals throughout the recovery period. Performance was measured in terms of peak and mean power output during WAnT 1 and WAnT 4.

Results:

After the recovery interventions, a large (r = .68 [90% CL .42; .83]) and very large (r = .72 (90% CL .49; .86]) positive correlation were observed between the change in calf arterial inflow and the change in mean and peak power output, respectively. Calf arterial inflow was significantly higher during the neuromuscular-electrical-stimulation recovery intervention than with the blood-flow-restriction, passive-rest, and placebo-stimulation interventions (P < .001). This corresponds to the only intervention that allowed performance recovery (P > .05). No recovery effect was linked to heart rate or blood lactate concentration levels.

Conclusions:

For the first time, these data support the existence of a positive correlation between an increase in blood flow and performance recovery between bouts of high-intensity exercise. As a practical consideration, this effect can be obtained by using neuromuscular electrical stimulation-induced blood flow since this passive, simple strategy could be easily applied during short-term recovery.

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Michael Svensson, Christer Malm, Michail Tonkonogi, Bjǒrn Ekblom, Bertil Sjödin and Kent Sahlin

The aim of the present study was to investigate the concentration of ubiquinone-10 (Q10), at rest, in human skeletal muscle and blood plasma before and after a period of high-intensity training with or without Q10 supplementation. Another aim was to explore whether adenine nucleotide catabolism, lipid peroxidation, and mitochondrial function were affected by Q10 treatment. Seventeen young healthy men were assigned to either a control (placebo) or a Q10-supplementation (120 mg/day) group. Q10 supplementation resulted in a significantly higher plasma Q10/lotal cholesterol level on Days 11 and20compared with Day 1. There was no significant change in the concentration of Q10 in skeletal muscle or in isolated skeletal muscle mitochondria in either group. Plasma hypoxanthine and uric acid concentrations increased markedly after each exercise test session in both groups. After the training period, the postexercise increase in plasma hypoxanthine was markedly reduced in both groups, but the response was partially reversed after the recovery period. It was concluded that Q10 supplementation increases the concentration of Q1O in plasma but not in skeletal muscle.

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Graeme I. Lancaster, Roy L.P.G. Jentjens, Luke Moseley, Asker E. Jeukendrup and Michael Gleeson

The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of pre-exercise carbohydrate (CHO) ingestion on circulating leukocyte numbers, plasma interleukin (IL)-6, plasma cortisol, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated neutrophil degranulation responses in moderately trained male cyclists who completed approximately 1-h of high-intensity cycling. The influence of the timing of pre-exercise CHO ingestion was investigated in 8 subjects who consumed 75 g CHO as a glucose solution at either 15 (–15 trial), or 75 (–75 trial) min before the onset of exercise. The influence of the amount of pre-exercise CHO ingestion was investigated in a further 10 subjects who consumed either 25 g or 200 g CHO as a glucose solution or a placebo 45 min before the onset of exercise. At the onset of exercise in the timing experiment, the plasma glucose concentration was significantly (p < .05) lower on the –75 trial compared with pre-drink values, and the plasma cortisol concentration and neutrophil to lymphocyte (N/L) ratio were significantly (p < .05) elevated in the post-exercise period. In the –15 trial, plasma glucose concentration was well maintained, and the plasma cortisol concentration and N/L ratio were not significantly elevated above resting levels. However, LPS-stimulated neutrophil degranulation was similar in the –15 and –75 trials. The amount of CHO ingested had no effect on the magnitude of the rise in the N/L ratio compared with placebo when consumed 45 min pre-exercise. Finally, although an exercise-induced increase in the plasma IL-6 concentration was observed, this effect was independent of pre-exercise CHO ingestion.

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Vitor de Salles Painelli, Rafael Pires da Silva, Odilon Marques de Oliveira Junior, Luana Farias de Oliveira, Fabiana Braga Benatti, Tobias Rabelo, João Paulo Limongi França Guilherme, Antonio Herbert Lancha Junior and Guilherme Giannini Artioli

We investigated the effects of low- and high-dose calcium lactate supplementation on blood pH and bicarbonate (Study A) and on repeated high-intensity performance (Study B). In Study A, 10 young, physically active men (age: 24 ± 2.5 years; weight: 79.2 ± 9.45 kg; height: 1.79 ± 0.06 m) were assigned to acutely receive three different treatments, in a crossover fashion: high-dose calcium lactate (HD: 300 mg·kg−1 body mass), low-dose calcium lactate (LD: 150 mg·kg−1 body mass) and placebo (PL). During each visit, participants received one of these treatments and were assessed for blood pH and bicarbonate 0, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, and 240 min following ingestion. In Study B, 12 young male participants (age: 26 ± 4.5 years; weight: 82.0 ± 11.0 kg; height: 1.81 ± 0.07 m) received the same treatments of Study A. Ninety minutes after ingestion, participants underwent 3 bouts of the upper-body Wingate test and were assessed for blood pH and bicarbonate 0 and 90 min following ingestion and immediately after exercise. In Study A, both HD and LD promoted slight but significant increases in blood bicarbonate (31.47 ± 1.57 and 31.69 ± 1.04 mmol·L−1, respectively) and pH levels (7.36 ± 0.02 and 7.36 ± 0.01, respectively), with no effect of PL. In Study B, total work done, peak power, mean power output were not affected by treatments. In conclusion, low- and high-dose calcium lactate supplementation induced similar, yet very discrete, increases in blood pH and bicarbonate, which were not sufficiently large to improve repeated high-intensity performance.

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Emma L. Sweeney, Daniel J. Peart, Irene Kyza, Thomas Harkes, Jason G. Ellis and Ian H. Walshe

regulation is apparent with various types of exercise ( Breen et al., 2011 ; Gillen et al., 2012 ), although high-intensity exercise may to be superior to moderate-intensity exercise for improving insulin sensitivity ( Ortega et al., 2015 ; Rynders et al., 2014 ). Sprint interval exercise has been shown to

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Tom Clifford, Eleanor J. Hayes, Jadine H. Scragg, Guy Taylor, Kieran Smith, Kelly A. Bowden Davies and Emma J. Stevenson

High-intensity exercise, especially that encompassing repetitive eccentric muscle contractions, often leads to muscle soreness, inflammation, and a drop in neuromuscular function that can persist for several days ( Hyldahl & Hubal, 2014 ; Warren et al., 2002 ). These symptoms are thought to be the

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Christopher Barnett, David L. Costill, Mathew D. Vukovich, Kevin J. Cole, Bret H. Goodpaster, Scott W. Trappe and William J. Fink

This study examined the effects of 14 days of L-camitine supplementation on muscle and blood camitine fractions, and muscle and blood lactate concentrations, during high-intensity sprint cycling exercise. Eight subjects performed three experimental trials: control 1 (CON I, Day 0), control I! (CON II, Day 14), and L-camitine (L-CN, Day 28). Each trial consisted of a 4-rain ride at 90% VO2max, followed by a rest period of 20 min, and thee five repeated 1-min rides at 115% VO2max (2 min rest between each). Following CON n, all subjects began dietary supplementation of L-camitine for a period of 14 days (4 g/day). Plasma total acid soluble and free camitine concentrations were significantly higher (p < .05) at all time points following supplementation. L-camitine supplementation had no significant effect on muscle camitine content and thus could not alter lactate accumulation during exercise.

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John Petrizzo, Frederick J. DiMenna, Kimberly Martins, John Wygand and Robert M. Otto

To achieve the criterion appearance before competing in a physique competition, athletes undergo preparatory regimens involving high-volume intense resistance and aerobic exercise with hypocaloric energy intake. As the popularity of “drug-free” competition increases, more athletes are facing this challenge without the recuperative advantage provided by performance-enhancing drugs. Consequently, the likelihood of loss of lean body and/or bone mass is increased. The purpose of this investigation was to monitor changes in body composition for a 29-year-old self-proclaimed drug-free female figure competitor during a 32-week preparatory regimen comprising high-volume resistance and aerobic exercise with hypocaloric energy intake. We used dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) to evaluate regional fat and bone mineral density. During the initial 22 weeks, the subject reduced energy intake and engaged in resistance (4–5 sessions/week) and aerobic (3 sessions/week) training. During the final 10 weeks, the subject increased exercise frequency to 6 (resistance) and 4 (aerobic) sessions/week while ingesting 1130–1380 kcal/day. During this 10-week period, she consumed a high quantity of protein (~55% of energy intake) and nutritional supplements. During the 32 weeks, body mass and fat mass decreased by 12% and 55%, respectively. Conversely, lean body mass increased by 1.5%, an amount that exceeded the coefficient of variation associated with DXA-derived measurement. Total bone mineral density was unchanged throughout. In summary, in preparation for a figure competition, a self-proclaimed drug-free female achieved the low body-fat percentage required for success in competition without losing lean mass or bone density by following a 32-week preparatory exercise and nutritional regimen.