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Jane Chung, George Demiris and Hilaire J. Thompson

Mobility is critical in maintaining independence in older adults. This study aims to systematically review the scientific literature to identify measures of mobility limitation for community-dwelling older adults. A systematic search of PubMed, CINAHL, and psycINFO, using the search terms “mobility limitation”, “mobility disability”, and “mobility difficulty” yielded 1,847 articles from 1990 to 2012; a final selection of 103 articles was used for the present manuscript. Tools to measure mobility were found to be either self-report or performance-based instruments. Commonly measured constructs of mobility included walking, climbing stairs, and lower extremity function. There was heterogeneity in ways of defining and measuring mobility limitation in older adults living in the community. Given the lack of consistency in assessment tools for mobility, a clear understanding and standardization of instruments are required for comparison across studies and for better understanding indicators and outcomes of mobility limitation in community-dwelling older adults.

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Juliessa M. Pavon, Richard J. Sloane, Carl F. Pieper, Cathleen S. Colón-Emeric, David Gallagher, Harvey J. Cohen, Katherine S. Hall, Miriam C. Morey, Midori McCarty, Thomas L. Ortel and Susan N. Hastings

for conditions such as delirium and venous thromboembolism (VTE). The example of VTE is particularly salient because clinical practice guidelines explicitly recommend consideration of mobility status when making decisions about anticoagulant use. Many clinicians have adopted near universal use of

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Deborah A.M. Jehu, Nicole Paquet and Yves Lajoie

a viable proxy to improve obstacle clearance and attention demand in older adults. In an attempt to further understand the control mechanisms of dual-task obstacle accommodation following training, the present experiment first aimed to determine whether 12 weeks of balance and mobility training (BMT

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Samuel W. Logan, Christina M. Hospodar, Kathleen R. Bogart, Michele A. Catena, Heather A. Feldner, Jenna Fitzgerald, Sarah Schaffer, Bethany Sloane, Benjamin Phelps, Joshua Phelps and William D. Smart

More than 30 years of research has demonstrated that young children with disabilities who use powered mobility devices for self-directed mobility experience developmental gains such as increased self-initiated social interactions and social skills, increased exploration of the environment, and

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Mary Hellen Morcelli, Dain Patrick LaRoche, Luciano Fernandes Crozara, Nise Ribeiro Marques, Camilla Zamfolini Hallal, Mauro Gonçalves and Marcelo Tavella Navega

Mobility is an important functional condition in older adults, which requires good walking gait performance as it is essential to many daily activities. 1 – 3 A common gait speed criterion for identifying mobility limitation is the ability to walk at 1.22 m·s −1 , which is the walking speed

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Aaron Witwer and Eric Sauers

Context:

Overhead stress from both swimming and throwing in water-polo players might lead to alterations in shoulder mobility and subsequent injury.

Objective:

To evaluate clinical measures of shoulder mobility in college water-polo players.

Design:

Repeated measures.

Setting:

University athletic training facility.

Patients:

31 Division I water-polo athletes.

Main Outcome Measures:

Measures were obtained for both the dominant and nondominant shoulders. Scapular upward rotation was measured using a digital inclinometer, posterior shoulder tightness was assessed by recording horizontal adduction with the scapula stabilized, and passive isolated glenohumeral-joint internal- and external-rotation range of motion were measured using goniometry.

Results:

No significant difference was observed between sides for scapular upward rotation (P = .68), posterior shoulder tightness (P = .25), or internal rotation (P = .41). A significant difference between sides was present for external rotation (P < .0001) and total arc of motion (P = .039).

Conclusions:

The dominant shoulders demonstrated significantly greater external rotation and a significantly greater total arc of motion than the nondominant shoulders did.

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Dawn C. Mackey, Alexander D. Perkins, Kaitlin Hong Tai, Joanie Sims-Gould and Heather A. McKay

Physical activity promotes mobility and independence ( Pahor et al., 2014 ), helps to prevent and manage a variety of chronic diseases ( Lee et al., 2012 ), reduces the risk of falls and related injuries ( Gillespie et al., 2012 ), and enhances physical, mental, and social health ( Bauman, Merom

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Guy C. Wilson, Yorgi Mavros, Lotti Tajouri and Maria Fiatarone Singh

. Outcomes (OR) (functional performance) (disability) (mobility) (functional capacity) (physical function*) (ADL) (IADL) (quality of life) (QOL) (daily activities) (daily function) (SF-36) (chair rise) (chair stand) (sit to stand) (stair climb) (stair power) (gait speed) (6 minute walk) (6mw*) (balance

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Jennifer L. Copeland

, metabolic syndrome, obesity, and all-cause mortality in older adults ( de Rezende, Rey-Lopez, Matsudo, & do Carmo Luiz, 2014 ). More sedentary time was associated with significantly greater predicted 10-year cardiovascular disease risk in adults age 70–89 years with mobility limitations, translating to a 1

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Chevelle M.A. Davis, Tetine L. Sentell, Juliana Fernandes de Souza Barbosa, Alban Ylli, Carmen-Lucia Curcio and Catherine M. Pirkle

moderate-intensity physical exercise per week through walking. Methods Study Design The data were collected as a part of the International Mobility in Aging Study (IMIAS), a prospective cohort study of community-dwelling older adults, across five sites: Tirana (Albania), Manizales (Colombia), Natal (Brazil