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Anna Mulasso, Mattia Roppolo, Monica Emma Liubicich, Michele Settanni and Emanuela Rabaglietti

The aim of this study was to assess the direct and indirect effects of a multicomponent exercise (MCE) program on mobility and balance in institutionalized older people. One hundred and twelve subjects (85 women; 83.0 years on average; SD = 7.5) were included in the study, and divided into a MCE-group (MCE-G) and a control group (CG) according to matching techniques. The MCE-G consisted of a 9-month program featuring range-of-motion, strength, and balance exercises performed in small groups. The CG received routine medical and nursing care. The timed up-and-go test and Tinetti Performance-Oriented Mobility Assessment balance subscale were administered at baseline and postintervention. After controlling for physical baseline value, age, sex, residential care facilities, and body mass index, the MCE-G showed positive effects both on mobility (p < .001) and balance (p = .001). The role of balance as mediator in the relationship between participation to the MCE program and mobility was demonstrated.

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Deborah A.M. Jehu, Nicole Paquet and Yves Lajoie

a viable proxy to improve obstacle clearance and attention demand in older adults. In an attempt to further understand the control mechanisms of dual-task obstacle accommodation following training, the present experiment first aimed to determine whether 12 weeks of balance and mobility training (BMT

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Aaron Witwer and Eric Sauers

Context:

Overhead stress from both swimming and throwing in water-polo players might lead to alterations in shoulder mobility and subsequent injury.

Objective:

To evaluate clinical measures of shoulder mobility in college water-polo players.

Design:

Repeated measures.

Setting:

University athletic training facility.

Patients:

31 Division I water-polo athletes.

Main Outcome Measures:

Measures were obtained for both the dominant and nondominant shoulders. Scapular upward rotation was measured using a digital inclinometer, posterior shoulder tightness was assessed by recording horizontal adduction with the scapula stabilized, and passive isolated glenohumeral-joint internal- and external-rotation range of motion were measured using goniometry.

Results:

No significant difference was observed between sides for scapular upward rotation (P = .68), posterior shoulder tightness (P = .25), or internal rotation (P = .41). A significant difference between sides was present for external rotation (P < .0001) and total arc of motion (P = .039).

Conclusions:

The dominant shoulders demonstrated significantly greater external rotation and a significantly greater total arc of motion than the nondominant shoulders did.

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Juliessa M. Pavon, Richard J. Sloane, Carl F. Pieper, Cathleen S. Colón-Emeric, David Gallagher, Harvey J. Cohen, Katherine S. Hall, Miriam C. Morey, Midori McCarty, Thomas L. Ortel and Susan N. Hastings

for conditions such as delirium and venous thromboembolism (VTE). The example of VTE is particularly salient because clinical practice guidelines explicitly recommend consideration of mobility status when making decisions about anticoagulant use. Many clinicians have adopted near universal use of

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Samuel W. Logan, Christina M. Hospodar, Kathleen R. Bogart, Michele A. Catena, Heather A. Feldner, Jenna Fitzgerald, Sarah Schaffer, Bethany Sloane, Benjamin Phelps, Joshua Phelps and William D. Smart

More than 30 years of research has demonstrated that young children with disabilities who use powered mobility devices for self-directed mobility experience developmental gains such as increased self-initiated social interactions and social skills, increased exploration of the environment, and

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Mary Hellen Morcelli, Dain Patrick LaRoche, Luciano Fernandes Crozara, Nise Ribeiro Marques, Camilla Zamfolini Hallal, Mauro Gonçalves and Marcelo Tavella Navega

Mobility is an important functional condition in older adults, which requires good walking gait performance as it is essential to many daily activities. 1 – 3 A common gait speed criterion for identifying mobility limitation is the ability to walk at 1.22 m·s −1 , which is the walking speed

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Dawn C. Mackey, Alexander D. Perkins, Kaitlin Hong Tai, Joanie Sims-Gould and Heather A. McKay

Physical activity promotes mobility and independence ( Pahor et al., 2014 ), helps to prevent and manage a variety of chronic diseases ( Lee et al., 2012 ), reduces the risk of falls and related injuries ( Gillespie et al., 2012 ), and enhances physical, mental, and social health ( Bauman, Merom

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Elizabeth J. Protas and Sandrine Tissier

The purpose of this study was to pilot test a function-focused exercise intervention consisting of strength and gait-speed training in elders with reduced walking speed, decreased walking endurance, and functional impairment. Twelve participants, 77.2 years old (± 7.34), whose usual gait speed was <0.85 m/s, with walking endurance of <305 m in 5 min, and who were functionally impaired participated in a moderate-intensity exercise intervention. The training occurred 3 times per week, 75 min per session, for 3 months and combined 4 weeks of gait-speed training, walking exercise, and functional strengthening. The participants demonstrated mean usual gait speeds (≥1.0 m/s), endurance (≥350 m), and functional ability (≥10 score on performance battery) that were within normal limits after 12 weeks of training. Fastest gait speed (≥1.5 m/s) and muscle strength also improved significantly. Improvements were maintained during follow-up testing after 3–6 months. In summary, a 12-week intervention for frail, mobility-disabled participants led to improvements in walking, function, and strength.

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Nathan F. Johnson, Chloe Hutchinson, Kaitlyn Hargett, Kyle Kosik and Phillip Gribble

ability to perform this functional task appears to be worth including in a clinical assessment of mobility and fall risk. 12 , 14 The sit-and-reach (S&R) test has traditionally been used to assess global flexibility despite a truncated focus on hamstring and lumbar extensibility. 15 However, the S&R is

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Guy C. Wilson, Yorgi Mavros, Lotti Tajouri and Maria Fiatarone Singh

. Outcomes (OR) (functional performance) (disability) (mobility) (functional capacity) (physical function*) (ADL) (IADL) (quality of life) (QOL) (daily activities) (daily function) (SF-36) (chair rise) (chair stand) (sit to stand) (stair climb) (stair power) (gait speed) (6 minute walk) (6mw*) (balance