Search Results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 257 items for :

Clear All
Restricted access

Lindsey Tulipani, Mark G. Boocock, Karen V. Lomond, Mahmoud El-Gohary, Duncan A. Reid and Sharon M. Henry

assess movement quality of multiple segments (pelvis, knee, and foot) simultaneously. 1 These studies demonstrate that PTs are less likely to assess movement patterns correctly during dynamic tasks and/or when tracking the alignment and movement quality of multiple body segments. Consequently, PTs may

Restricted access

Mary Emily Littrell, Young-Hui Chang and Brian P. Selgrade

, deg  25% 0.374 (0.26) NS 0.469 (0.11) NS 1.20 ( 0.22 ) NS  50% 0.477 (0.18) NS 0.450 (0.10) NS NS NS  75% NS 0.797 (0.10) 0.631 (0.10) NS 2.18 ( 0.33 ) NS Pelvis angle, deg  25% 9.01 ( 0.13 ) 10.10 ( 0.15 ) 10.79 ( 0.09 ) 9.04 ( 0.17 ) 4.82 ( 0.68 ) 8.75 ( 0.17 )  50% 5.22 ( 0.12 ) 5.71 ( 0

Restricted access

Rafael F. Escamilla, Jonathan S. Slowik, Alek Z. Diffendaffer and Glenn S. Fleisig

was hypothesized that pelvis and upper trunk axial rotation and elbow extension velocities will be greatest in the sidearm group, whereas shoulder external rotation, shoulder internal rotation angular velocity, and trunk forward tilt would be greatest in the overhand group. Methods This study was

Restricted access

Ziemowit Bańkosz and Sławomir Winiarski

–extension and internal–external rotation); knee joint (flexion–extension and internal–external rotation); and hip joint (flexion–extension, internal–external rotation, and abduction–adduction). In addition, spatial orientation of pelvis (obliquity, tilt, and rotation); shoulder girdle (obliquity, tilt, and

Restricted access

Yoann Blache, Maarten Bobbert, Sebastien Argaud, Benoit Pairot de Fontenay and Karine M. Monteil

In experiments investigating vertical squat jumping, the HAT segment is typically defined as a line drawn from the hip to some point proximally on the upper body (eg, the neck, the acromion), and the hip joint as the angle between this line and the upper legs (θUL-HAT). In reality, the hip joint is the angle between the pelvis and the upper legs (θUL-pelvis). This study aimed to estimate to what extent hip joint definition affects hip joint work in maximal squat jumping. Moreover, the initial pelvic tilt was manipulated to maximize the difference in hip joint work as a function of hip joint definition. Twenty-two male athletes performed maximum effort squat jumps in three different initial pelvic tilt conditions: backward (pelvisB), neutral (pelvisN), and forward (pelvisF). Hip joint work was calculated by integrating the hip net joint torque with respect to θUL-HAT (WUL-HAT) or with respect to θUL-pelvis (WUL-pelvis). θUL-HAT was greater than θUL-pelvis in all conditions. WUL-HAT overestimated WUL-pelvis by 33%, 39%, and 49% in conditions pelvisF, pelvisN, and pelvisB, respectively. It was concluded that θUL-pelvis should be measured when the mechanical output of hip extensor muscles is estimated.

Restricted access

Ben Serrien, Maggy Goossens and Jean-Pierre Baeyens

processing. The marker coordinates were used to construct local orthonormal reference frames per segment to calculate segment angles (pelvis and trunk) and joint angles (shoulder, elbow, and wrist) based on the International Society of Biomechanics (ISB) guidelines for construction of reference frames and

Restricted access

Lachlan E. Garrick, Bryce C. Alexander, Anthony G. Schache, Marcus G. Pandy, Kay M. Crossley and Natalie J. Collins

, particularly dynamic knee valgus, is an important target to prevent and manage running-related pain and injury. The single-leg squat is a functional movement test commonly used by sports medicine practitioners to evaluate single-leg dynamic control of the trunk, pelvis, and lower limb. Lower limb movement

Restricted access

Eric Foch and Clare E. Milner

Proximal factors such as excessive frontal plane pelvis and trunk motion have been postulated to be biomechanical risk factors associated with iliotibial band syndrome. In addition, lateral core endurance deficiencies may be related to increased pelvis and trunk motion during running. The purpose of this cross-sectional investigation was to determine if differences in biomechanics during running, as well as lateral core endurance exist between female runners with previous iliotibial band syndrome and controls. Gait and lateral core endurance were assessed in 34 female runners (17 with previous iliotibial band syndrome). Multivariate analysis of variance was performed to assess between group difference in pelvis, trunk, hip, and knee variables of interest. Runners with previous iliotibial band syndrome exhibited similar peak trunk lateral flexion, peak contralateral pelvic drop, peak hip adduction, and peak external knee adduction moment compared with controls. In addition, trunk-pelvis coordination was similar between groups. Contrary to our hypotheses, both groups exhibited trunk ipsilateral flexion. Lateral core endurance was not different between groups. These findings provide the first frontal plane pelvis and trunk kinematic data set in female runners with previous iliotibial band syndrome. Frontal plane pelvis and trunk motion may not be associated with iliotibial band syndrome.

Restricted access

Jianwei Duan, Kuan Wang, Tongbo Chang, Lejun Wang, Shengnian Zhang and Wenxin Niu

0.625-mm slice thickness. Scanning range includes the fifth lumbar vertebrae, intervertebral disc, whole pelvis, and the two proximal femurs in the standard supine position. The image data were imported into Mimics (version 17.0; Materialise, Leuven, Belgium) for segmentation and reconstruction

Restricted access

Courtney L. Pollock, Michael A. Hunt, Taian M. Vieira, Alessio Gallina, Tanya D. Ivanova and S. Jayne Garland

). A postural control challenge paradigm was employed, which has been shown to increase external torque applied to the ankle joint ( Pollock, Ivanova, Hunt, & Garland, 2014 ). A belt was secured around the pelvis of each participant and was attached to a horizontal cable in front of the participant