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Dean J. Kriellaars, John Cairney, Marco A.C. Bortoleto, Tia K.M. Kiez, Dean Dudley and Patrice Aubertin

Physical literacy (PL) refers to the competence to perform movement skills, but also the confidence, comprehension, and motivation to allow one to lead a physically active life ( Cohen, Morgan, Plotnikoff, Callister, & Lubans, 2014 ). Other definitions have also included the importance of social

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James Mandigo, Ken Lodewyk and Jay Tredway

Physical literacy has become an important outcome across many educational, sport, and recreation settings in Canada ( Jurbala, 2015 ; Mandigo & Lathrop, 2014 ). For example, recent updates to provincial physical education (PE) curricula in provinces such as Ontario ( Ontario Ministry of Education

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Dean Dudley, John Cairney and Jackie Goodway

Welcome to this special issue of the Journal of Teaching in Physical Education (JTPE) that we believe provide readers with new data driven and empirical insight into the concept of physical literacy. This issue will have meaningful implications for the planning, reporting, assessment, and

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Claire E. Francis, Patricia E. Longmuir, Charles Boyer, Lars Bo Andersen, Joel D. Barnes, Elena Boiarskaia, John Cairney, Avery D. Faigenbaum, Guy Faulkner, Beth P. Hands, John A. Hay, Ian Janssen, Peter T. Katzmarzyk, Han C. G. Kemper, Duane Knudson, Meghann Lloyd, Thomas L. McKenzie, Tim S. Olds, Jennifer M. Sacheck, Roy J. Shephard, Weimo Zhu and Mark S. Tremblay

Background:

The Canadian Assessment of Physical Literacy (CAPL) was conceptualized as a tool to monitor children’s physical literacy. The original model (fitness, activity behavior, knowledge, motor skill) required revision and relative weights for calculating/interpreting scores were required.

Methods:

Nineteen childhood physical activity/fitness experts completed a 3-round Delphi process. Round 1 was open-ended questions. Subsequent rounds rated statements using a 5-point Likert scale. Recommendations were sought regarding protocol inclusion, relative importance within composite scores and score interpretation.

Results:

Delphi participant consensus was achieved for 64% (47/73) of statement topics, including a revised conceptual model, specific assessment protocols, the importance of longitudinal tracking, and the relative importance of individual protocols and composite scores. Divergent opinions remained regarding the inclusion of sleep time, assessment/scoring of the obstacle course assessment of motor skill, and the need for an overall physical literacy classification.

Conclusions:

The revised CAPL model (overlapping domains of physical competence, motivation, and knowledge, encompassed by daily behavior) is appropriate for monitoring the physical literacy of children aged 8 to 12 years. Objectively measured domains (daily behavior, physical competence) have higher relative importance. The interpretation of CAPL results should be reevaluated as more data become available.

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Kelly P. Arbour-Nicitopoulos, Viviane Grassmann, Krystn Orr, Amy C. McPherson, Guy E. Faulkner and F. Virginia Wright

) aims to promote equal access and physical literacy opportunities (e.g., movement skills, motivation, and confidence; International Physical Literacy Association, 2016 ) for all children and youth ( Rimmer et al., 2014 ). Inclusive PA is often regarded as a “socializing environment to teach

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Jennifer McConnell-Nzunga, Katie A. Weatherson, Louise Masse, Valerie Carson, Guy Faulkner, Erica Lau, Heather McKay, Viviene Temple, Luke Wolfenden and Patti J. Naylor

Respondents indicated on a 5-point Likert scale from “daily” to “rarely/never” whether the children in their care engaged in at least 120 minutes of active play and PA per day (60 min for 1/2 d), spent 30 minutes or less on screens per day, took part in daily activities that develop FMS (physical literacy

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Sarpreet Kahlon, Kiah Brubacher-Cressman, Erica Caron, Keren Ramonov, Ruth Taubman, Katherine Berg, F. Virginia Wright and Alicia J. Hilderley

activity and body function benefits of PA, participation is considered as a critical component for physical, social, and psychological development and well-being ( World Health Organization, 2007 ). Benefiting from PA throughout life may be contingent upon the development of physical literacy, defined as

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Bronagh McGrane, Danielle Powell, Sarahjane Belton and Johann Issartel

Objectives: To explore the relationship between fundamental movement skill (FMS) competence, perceived FMS competence, and physical activity (PA) in adolescents. Methods: The Test of Gross Motor Development (TGMD), the TGMD 2nd Edition (TGMD-2), and the Victorian Skills manual were used to assess FMS competence (locomotor, object control, and stability). The Physical Self Confidence scale was used to assess perceived FMS competence (locomotor, object control, and stability). Moderate-to-vigorous intensity PA (MVPA) was measured via accelerometry. Multi-level modelling analyses was used to examine (i) actual FMS as the predictor and perceived FMS as the outcome, (ii) perceived FMS as the predictor and MVPA as the outcome, and (iii) actual FMS as the predictor and MVPA as the outcome. All analyses were completed for each subtest of FMS (locomotor, object control, and stability). Results: A total of 584 adolescents (boys n = 278) aged 12.82–15.25 years (M = 13.78, SD = .42) participated in this study. Actual stability was associated with perceived stability (p < .01) and MVPA (p < .05) in boys. This was not found true for girls; however, actual locomotor skills were associated with MVPA (p ≤ .05). Boys scored significantly higher than girls for FMS proficiency, perceived FMS, and MVPA (p < .05). Discussion: Gender differences may exist due to cultural gender differences in sport participation norms. Considering the magnitude of physical and psychological changes occurring during adolescence, it is recommended to track young people over time to better understand the relationship between perceived and actual FMS, as well as PA participation.

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Erin K. Sharpe, Scott Forrester and James Mandigo

Background:

This paper evaluates the impact of a large-scale, community agency-driven initiative to increase physical activity (PA) in after-school programs in Ontario. In 2008, the YMCA and Boys and Girls Club (BGC) introduced CATCH Kids Club (CKC) into 330 after-school program sites.

Methods:

This study assessed the impact of the intervention on the quality and quantity of PA using a pretest/posttest quasi-experimental research design with a comparison non-CKC group. Data were collected at baseline (September 2008) and postintervention (May/June 2009) using the System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time (SOFIT).

Results:

Nearly all sites, with the exception of the BGC baseline program (a sports program) achieved greater than 50% of time spent in MVPA. Significant differences were not found between levels of MVPA at CKC and comparison sites (59.3% vs. 64.2%), or at CKC sites at baseline versus postintervention (59.3% vs. 52.1%). BGC sites had significantly higher levels MVPA in CKC programs than in sports programs (70.8% vs. 35.2%). In postimplementation interviews, leaders reported general support but some mixed reactions related to how the program was received by participants.

Conclusions:

This paper offers support for PA programs that focus on inclusivity and enjoyment and emphasize the important role of staff competency.

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Gorden Sudeck, Stephanie Jeckel and Tanja Schubert

Physical activity (PA) is positively associated with affective well-being in adults. This study investigated the moderating role of the competence for PA-related affect regulation in the PA–affect association in real-life situations. A total of 37 women and 27 men completed an ecological momentary assessment study in which the authors used accelerometers to record PA and e-diaries to collect data on affective well-being on 4 study days. They applied multilevel analyses to estimate the within-person effects of PA on affective well-being and cross-level interactions between PA (within person) and PA-related affect regulation (between persons). Results revealed cross-level interaction effects between within-person PA variations and competence for PA-related affect regulation on the affect dimensions of calmness (p < .01) and valence (p = .04). Thus, the competence for PA-related affect regulation moderates the PA–affect association in real-life situations. Therefore, individual-based PA promotion should consider these individual differences to develop tailored interventions.