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Scott W. Cheatham, Kyle R. Stull, Mike Fantigrassi and Ian Montel

data were extracted from each article: subject demographics, hip conditions, movement, outcomes, and results. The research design of each study was also identified by the reviewers. Qualifying manuscripts were assessed according to the Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale for appraising the quality of

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Timothy M. Wohlfert and Kevin C. Miller

’ TS and RPE during exercise in the heat after they underwent CWI to responses from the same subjects who were not precooled. To be included, studies must have been of level-2 evidence or higher (Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine [CEBM]) 1 and have Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro

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Mohammad Reza Pourahmadi, Ismail Ebrahimi Takamjani, Shapour Jaberzadeh, Javad Sarrafzadeh, Mohammad Ali Sanjari, Rasool Bagheri and Morteza Taghipour

participants; reduced ratio of movements and lumbar spine-hip coordination in LBP participants Tully et al 40 (2005), Australia a Forty-seven healthy physiotherapy students (20 males and 27 females); age: 20.1 (2.8) y and BMI: 20.7 (2.3) kg/m 2 2-D Peak Motus Motion Analysis System (PEAK Performance

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Rosa M. Rodriguez, Ashley Marroquin and Nicole Cosby

psychological factors during physical rehabilitation for an athlete to rebuild confidence and overcome fear of reinjury. Currently, most physiotherapy and rehabilitation research has primarily focused on the physical treatment without focusing on the psychological aspects of recovery following an injury. 5 , 7

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Monna Arvinen-Barrow, Brian Hemmings, Daniel Weigand, Caryl Becker and Lynn Booth

Objective:

To assess, on a national level, the views of chartered physiotherapists with regard to the psychological content of physiotherapy practice.

Design:

A postal survey to a national list of sport injury and physiotherapy clinics was employed.

Participants:

A total of 361 responses were included in the descriptive statistical and qualitative analyses.

Measurements:

The Physiotherapist and Sport Psychology Questionnaire (PSPQ).

Results:

On average, physiotherapists felt that athletes were psychologically affected 83% of the time when injured. Key psychological characteristics were also identified in athletes who cope/do not cope successfully with their injuries. Physiotherapists reported using psychological techniques in their work and expressed the need for further training in the field. Only 24.1% of the physiotherapists stated having accesses to accredited sport psychologists.

Conclusions:

Results suggest that UK physiotherapists possess practical experiences and good awareness for psychological aspects of injuries and acknowledge the importance of treating a range of psychological conditions.

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H. Jan Dordel

Individuals with severe physical and psychomotor modifications after a brain injury need measures of motor training beyond the usual physiotherapy. The effects of an intensive mobility training in the phase of late rehabilitation are reported in two case studies. The coordinative and conditional progresses were controlled by the methods of photographic anthropometry, light-track registration, and bicycle ergometry. Improvements were found in posture and dynamic endurance in correlation with the generally improving motor control. Tests of everyday relevant movements revealed qualitative progresses in the sense of increased motor precision and economy.

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Monna Arvinen-Barrow, Brian Hemmings, Caryl A. Becker and Lynn Booth

To gain an insight to the existing suggestions and recommendations on chartered physiotherapists’ preferred methods of delivery for further training in sport psychology.

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Tania Pizzari, Helen McBurney, Nicholas F. Taylor and Julian A. Feller

Objective:

To investigate the subjective experience of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rehabilitation and identify variables that influence adherence as perceived by ACL-reconstructed patients.

Design:

A qualitative study using in-depth interviews to gather data and thematic coding to analyze findings.

Setting:

Participants were interviewed at home or in their workplace.

Participants:

Eleven patients were interviewed at an average of 4.8 months (SD = 0.8) after ACL reconstruction.

Results:

Using thematic coding of the interview data, 3 categories of variables influencing adherence emerged: environmental factors, physical factors, and psychological factors. Variables specifically affecting adherence to home exercise were perceived lack of time and a lack of self-motivation. Fear of reinjury emerged as a significant consideration for those who were nonadherent. Factors such as therapist support, the rehabilitation clinic, and the progression of exercises were identified as being important for attendance at physiotherapy appointments and adherence during appointments.

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Carla Sordoni, Craig Hall and Lorie Forwell

Objectives:

To determine whether athletes use motivational and cognitive imagery during injury rehabilitation and to develop an instrument for measuring imagery use.

Design:

A survey concerning imagery use during rehabilitation was administered to injured athletes.

Setting:

The Fowler Kennedy Sport Medicine Clinic in London, Ontario, Canada.

Participants:

Injured athletes (N = 71) receiving physiotherapy.

Main Outcome Measure:

The Athletic Injury Imagery Questionnaire (AIIQ).

Results:

As hypothesized, 2 distinct factors emerged from the items on the AIIQ: motivational and cognitive imagery. Motivational imagery was used more often than cognitive imagery in this context, yet less frequently than in other sport situations (eg, training and competition).

Conclusions:

The study indicates that the AIIQ is a potentially useful tool through which physiotherapists and sport psychologists can examine athletes' use of imagery in injury rehabilitation.

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Marcel Bouffard and Greg Reid

The evidence-based practice (EBP) movement has been extremely influential over the last 20 years. Fields like medicine, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, nursing, psychology, and education have adopted the idea that policy makers and practitioners should use interventions that have demonstrated efficiency and effectiveness. This apparently straightforward idea is beginning to affect adapted physical activity; however, researchers and practitioners in our field often appear to be unaware of fundamental questions related to them. The major purpose of this paper is to outline and discuss 10 of these fundamental questions. This analysis leads us to conclude that EBP is a good direction to pursue in adapted physical activity if we develop a type of EBP congruent with the main tenets of our field.