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Column-editor : Kathleen M. Laquale

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Bruce M. Lima, Rafael S. Amancio, Diacre S. Gonçalves, Alexander J. Koch, Victor M. Curty and Marco Machado

; 1 hour per session; 3 to 5 sets per exercise; 6 to 15 repetitions per set; biceps curl and Scott experience; repetitions maximum sets (to failure) experience; and 1 to 2 minutes rest intervals between sets. Table 1 Subject Characteristics (N = 21) Variables CON (n = 7) RED 5 (n = 7) RED 10 (n = 7

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Sanna M. Nordin-Bates, Andrew P. Hill, Jennifer Cumming, Imogen J. Aujla and Emma Redding

The present study examined the relationship between dance-related perfectionism and perceptions of motivational climate in dance over time. In doing so, three possibilities were tested: (a) perfectionism affects perceptions of the motivational climate, (b) perceptions of the motivational climate affect perfectionism, and (c) the relationship is reciprocal. Two hundred seventy-one young dancers (M = 14.21 years old, SD = 1.96) from UK Centres for Advanced Training completed questionnaires twice, approximately 6 months apart. Cross-lagged analysis indicated that perfectionistic concerns led to increased perceptions of an ego-involving climate and decreased perceptions of a task-involving climate over time. In addition, perceptions of a task-involving climate led to increased perfectionistic strivings over time. The findings suggest that perfectionistic concerns may color perceptions of training/performing environments so that mistakes are deemed unacceptable and only superior performance is valued. They also suggest that perceptions of a task-involving climate in training/performing environments may encourage striving for excellence and perfection without promoting excessive concerns regarding their attainment.

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Louise M. Burke, Graeme L. Close, Bronwen Lundy, Martin Mooses, James P. Morton and Adam S. Tenforde

Recognition of low energy availability (LEA) in male athletes, associated with a range of negative outcomes, played a role in the framing of the Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport (RED-S) syndrome ( Mountjoy et al., 2014 ). Indeed, a variety of scenarios have been investigated in which male

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Ida A. Heikura, Arja L.T. Uusitalo, Trent Stellingwerff, Dan Bergland, Antti A. Mero and Louise M. Burke

) in females. On the contrary, until recently, research on low EA in male athletes was lacking almost completely. Indeed, it was not until 2014, when the concept of relative energy deficiency in sport (RED-S) was introduced to include both sexes and a broader spectrum of health and performance

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Teri Riding McCabe, Jatin P. Ambegaonkar, Matthew Wyon and Emma Redding

Context:

The female dancer’s technique in DanceSport involves keeping the upper body and head poised in extension and left rotation. Attempting to maintain this position while dancing can lead to an extension neck injury (ENI).

Objective:

The aim of this online survey was to discover the prevalence of ENI among female ballroom dancers.

Design and Participants:

Female DanceSport competitors (N = 127) completed an online survey.

Results:

Twenty-fve percent reported having ENI, and 68% of ENI occurred at competitions. Younger dancers (mean age = 20 ± 4.8 years) were significantly (p < .003) more likely to have ENI than older dancers (mean age = 34 ± 12.9 years).

Conclusions:

ENI is prevalent in DanceSport competitors. Dance medicine professionals should consider this when designing injury prevention programs.

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Jim Mckay and Donna O’Connor

share a successful high performance coach’s approach to practicing unstructured aspects of team play to enhance team performance. The approach was implemented by Jim Mckay (attack coach) during the Queensland Red’s Super Rugby 2010–2013 campaigns. This paper is organized into three sections. The first

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James R. Day, Matthew R. Hanson and Melody J. Reding

Edited by Michael G. Dolan

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Jessica M. Lipschitz, Miryam Yusufov, Andrea Paiva, Colleen A. Redding, Joseph S. Rossi, Sara Johnson, Bryan Blissmer, N. Simay Gokbayrak, Wayne F. Velicer and James O. Prochaska

This study examined longitudinal differences in use of transtheoretical model (TTM) behavior change constructs in maintainers (who reached and maintained exercise guidelines), relapsers (who reached guidelines, then regressed), and nonchangers (who did not reach guidelines). Data from two population-based TTM-tailored randomized trial intervention groups targeting exercise behavior (N = 1050) were pooled, and analyses assessed differences in TTM constructs between the three groups at baseline, 12 months, and 24 months. Findings indicated that relapsers tended to use TTM variables similarly to maintainers with the exception of self-efficacy, consciousness raising, and most behavioral processes of change, at 24 months. Nonchangers, however, used all TTM variables less than maintainers at nearly every time point. Findings suggest that relapsers remain more active than nonchangers in terms of use of change processes. Poor response to interventions (nonchangers) may be predicted by low baseline engagement in change processes. Although relapsers reverted to physical inactivity, their overall greater use of TTM constructs suggests that their efforts to change remain better than those of the stable nonchanger group. Future research can focus on treatment engagement strategies to help the stable nonchangers initiate change and to help relapsers to maintain treatment gains.