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Megan B. Shreffler, Samuel H. Schmidt and James Weiner

Sport management as an academic discipline remains relatively young in comparison to similar disciplines such as psychology, sociology, and business. Ohio University established the first sport management academic program in 1966. Since the inception of Ohio University’s program, the field has

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individual behaviors is one that is relevant to sport management researchers in a range of focus areas (e.g., consumer behavior, marketing, sport development, sport policy). In this article, the authors conducted four experiments in which they investigated individuals’ responses to low-consensus information

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Velina B. Brackebusch

Teaching Notes and Rationale As part of their undergraduate degree, students take an introduction to sport management class where they complete a 20-hr integrative experience with the Department of Athletics or a sport nonprofit organization. Its purpose is to provide students with the expertise of

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Meg G. Hancock, Lindsey Darvin and Nefertiti A. Walker

In 2009, it was estimated that there were more than 300 sport management undergraduate and graduate programs across the United States ( King, 2009 ). That number had grown to more than 640 sport management programs in 2016 (North American Society for Sport Management [ NASSM, 2016 ]), representing

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media outlets such as Sports Illustrated as well as scientific papers appearing in the British Journal of Sports Medicine , Journal of Sport Management , and Sport History  have highlighted the Goldman Dilemma, this article offers doubts in accepting the scientific credibility of Goldman’s survey

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reliance on big data. Baerg, A. (2017). Big data, sport, and the digital divide: Theorizing how athletes might respond to big data monitoring. Journal of Sport and Social Issues, 41, 3–20. doi: 10.1177/0193723516673409 Student Mentoring Mentoring sport management students is an important duty of sport

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., Lough, N., & Barnes, J.C. (2016). Examination of women’s sports fans’ attitudes and consumption intentions. Journal of Applied Sport Management, 8 , 25–43. doi: 10.18666/JASM-2016-V8-I4-7221 Online Versus Traditional Marketing Classes Research has indicated that the electronic methods in use for online

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Emily Dane-Staples

As accountability and the nature of higher education are changing to an emphasis on teaching, it is critical for faculty to have pedagogical training to develop their classroom skills. Currently, most doctoral programs do not require pedagogical courses therefore faculty must independently seek knowledge on how to engage students and to teach the specifics of sport management. This article discusses the foundations of constructivist learning and some specific teaching strategies relevant for a sport management classroom. Drawing on educational and psychological theory, a six-element framework is outlined where instructors attempt to reach long-term learning, not just a memorization of facts. The overall framework and each element are discussed and then strategies such as the Fishbowl, Active Opinion, Talking in Circles, and group selection options are introduced. The benefit of this approach to the classroom is that it is not topic specific, and can be implemented in a variety of sport management classrooms.

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Jon Billsberry, Jacqueline Mueller, James Skinner, Steve Swanson, Ben Corbett and Lesley Ferkins

As a transdisciplinary topic, leadership has relevance across many contexts, but there are very few where it is more relevant than in sport management. Role-assigned leaders such as team captains, team managers, CEOs, chairpersons, and presidents of sport organizations all attract considerable

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Earle F. Zeigler

The author argues that present conditions justify an analysis of sport management, broadly interpreted, from the standpoint of its historical background, its present status, and its possible future. Three reasons are given: A new North American Society for Sport Management has just been established; serious criticism has been leveled at both professional sport and so-called educational sport; and management theory and practice has become an increasingly complex subject. Several questions are considered: What has been the historical background of sport management? What is its present status? What plan should be followed for the finest sort of progress in the years ahead? And what may be reasonably concluded from this analysis? The author concludes that (a) the field still has an opportunity to relate significantly to the developing social science of management but time is running short; (b) the vast enterprise that is sport must relate more effectively to the urgent need for qualified managers; (c) the new North American Society for Sport Management can make a significant contribution to this development; and (d) such development should be carried out in full cooperation with the National Association for Sport and Physical Education within the AAHPERD and the Canadian Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation.