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Stacey Alvarez-Alvarado, Graig M. Chow, Nicole T. Gabana, Robert C. Hickner and Gershon Tenenbaum

( Aragonés et al., 2013 ). The current study’s results revealed that perceived exertion, attentional focus, and perceived activation increased linearly to sustain the changes in physical effort, whereas affective valence decreased in a quadratic manner. Particularly, the perceptual–cognitive resources and

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Artur Direito, Joseph J. Murphy, Matthew Mclaughlin, Jacqueline Mair, Kelly Mackenzie, Masamitsu Kamada, Rachel Sutherland, Shannon Montgomery, Trevor Shilton and on behalf of the ISPAH Early Career Network

population levels of PA exist but need to be prioritized and scaled up to achieve the World Health Organization’s targets to reduce physical inactivity levels by 15% by 2030 10 and assist in achieving the United Nations’ (UN) 2030 sustainable development goals (SDGs; Figure  1 ). 11 Figure 1 —Links between

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Carolina Menezes Fiorelli, Emmanuel Gomes Ciolac, Lucas Simieli, Fabiana Araújo Silva, Bianca Fernandes, Gustavo Christofoletti and Fabio Augusto Barbieri

in multiple system and not only basal ganglia. 3 The main cognitive impairments happened in working memory, 4 , 5 executive function, 4 visuospatial skills, 5 and sustained attention, 5 , 6 which aggravates motor symptoms. 4 However, in contrast to the motor symptoms caused by the disease

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Deborah Hebling Spinoso, Nise Ribeiro Marques, Dain Patrick LaRoche, Camilla Zamfollini Hallal, Aline Harumi Karuka, Fernanda Cristina Milanezi and Mauro Gonçalves

contractions, and because this study’s estimate was not based on the ability to perform an activity but rather on the ability to walk at a sustainable effort (80% FD). This study is an important first step in developing strength thresholds for each of the major sagittal plane joint actions of the lower

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Declan J. Ryan, Jorgen A. Wullems, Georgina K. Stebbings, Christopher I. Morse, Claire E. Stewart and Gladys L. Onambele-Pearson

participants [73.8 (6.22) y, 60–89 y, 55% female; Table  1 ], who did not suffer from an untreated CVD, had not sustained a PB limiting injury within the last 3 months, were independently mobile, and deemed generally healthy, were recruited for the study. Participant approval for study inclusion was provided

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Sheila A. Dugan, Kelly Karavolos, Elizabeth B. Lynch, Chiquia S. Hollings, Francis Fullam, Brittney S. Lange-Maia and Lynda H. Powell

Background:

Physical inactivity in midlife women is associated with increased intra-abdominal adipose tissue development. We describe an innovative multimethod study 1) to better understand barriers to physical activity (PA) and 2) to engage midlife women to product test physical activities and identify local community-based providers and sustainable and fun PA experiences.

Methods:

Formative research on PA barriers from the Chicago site Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN) ancillary study of midlife women was used to develop a pilot testing measure. Feasibility, acceptability and sustainability of the PA activities were determined using the measure.

Results:

Desirable locations and/or instructors were identified. The first 2 groups identified, pilot tested, and then ranked activities for their ability to promote sustained PA. The 6 top-ranked were: circuit training, total body fitness, kickboxing, Zumba, Pilates, and pedometer. The final group pilot tested highly ranked PA in 2-week blocks, and ranked pedometer and Zumba in their top 3.

Conclusion:

Consensus was reached regarding activities that could be valuable in promoting sustained PA in midlife women. Choosing convenient sites and popular instructors further facilitates sustainability. Building relationships with key community partners is essential for sustainability. Community-based participant involvement in study design is a critical element in developing a healthy living intervention.

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Dawn C. Mackey, Alexander D. Perkins, Kaitlin Hong Tai, Joanie Sims-Gould and Heather A. McKay

options to promote sustainability over the long-term. The personal action plan specified what, where, when, how, and with whom physical activities would take place. The activity coach encouraged participants to work toward undertaking physical activity three to five times per week in a progressive manner

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Kara C. Hamilton, Mark T. Richardson, Shanda McGraw, Teirdre Owens and John C. Higginbotham

interventions, however, have had little effect on overall PA levels, as these interventions rely, not on intrinsic motivation, but on extrinsic motivation guided by external reward or coercion, a strategy that has shown little success in achieving sustainable behavior change. 14 Rather than attempting to

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Karen Tonge, Rachel A. Jones and Anthony D. Okely

free routines offering choice and independence, elements that contribute to sustained engagement, and uninterrupted time that afford quality experiences. 32 Cross-cultural research shows the value of child-initiated play, including the affordance of choice and independence across a range of

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Katie Crockett, Saija A. Kontulainen, Jonathan P. Farthing, Philip D. Chilibeck, Brenna Bath, Adam D.G. Baxter-Jones and Catherine M. Arnold

identified as a marker of osteoporosis, and a strong predictor of future fracture (OR 1.5–95% CI 1.2-1.8) ( Kelsey et al., 2005 ; Osteoporosis Canada, 2013 ). With women at a greater risk of sustaining a wrist fracture than men ( Edwards et al., 2006 ; Nguyen, Center, Sambrook, & Eisman, 2001 ), and