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Susan K. Lynn and Amelia Mays Woods

The Fessler and Christensen (1992) teacher career cycle model provides the theoretical framework for this case study incorporating a narrative design nested within a larger research project examining six teachers’ journey across the career cycle (Woods & Earls, 1995; Woods & Lynn, 2001). The current case study sought to gain a greater understanding of why one teacher, Patsy, was unable to negotiate environmental hurdles that are commonplace in physical education and how these factors were being negotiated as a classroom teacher. Data sources included: seven interviews with the participant, multiple interviews with her principals, spouse, and three former university teacher educators, field notes from live lesson observations, and related documents. An interpretative framework was used to understand the perceptions and meanings Patsy gave to her experiences and revealed that she reported being both positively and negatively affected by most of the personal and organizational environmental factors in the teacher career cycle model. Viewing Patsy’s teaching career through the lens of the career cycle provides insight into areas of change necessary to motivate and retain quality physical education teachers.

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Amelia Mays Woods and Jesse Lee Rhoades

This study examined National Board Certified Physical Education Teacher’s (NBCPETs) demographic characteristics, recalled subjective warrants for entrance into the profession, and reasons for seeking this advanced certification. An extensive search for approximately 1,200 NBCPETs resulted in contact information for 819 NBCPETs. All were sent a demographic questionnaire which 334 returned, resulting in a 41% return rate. Sixty five were randomly selected and participated in qualitative interviews. The results indicate that NBCPETs are predominantly female (79%), Caucasian (78.9%), hold masters degrees (71.1%), and work in the elementary setting (55.1%). The mean age is 45 years, with about 20 years of teaching experience. Several themes related to subjective warrant emerged including career pursuit because of: a joy of working with and helping children; continued association with sport and physical activity; lack of aspirations to coach; and enjoyment of physical activity. The most frequent reasons for pursuit of NBC were related to procurement of financial incentives, an attempt to confront the challenge, and a desire to develop professionally.

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Shirley Gray, Paul M. Wright, Richard Sievwright and Stuart Robertson

, 2011 ; Taylor, Oberle, Durlak, & Weissberg, 2017 ). It is in the interest of all teachers and their learners therefore to develop knowledge and strategies that might nurture and promote social and emotional learning in schools, and specifically in PE ( Jacobs & Wright, 2014 ). Teaching personal and

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Janice C. Wendt and Linda L. Bain

Physical educators’ perceptions of stressful teaching events do not change over a period of 1 to 5 years of teaching experience. Although there was a trend for priority and teaching function perceptions to be rated lower, no significant differences were found when using a MANOVA. Notification of unsatisfactory performance and being involuntarily transferred were rated the most stressful by both groups. Rated least stressful by both student and novice teachers was attendance at inservice meetings.

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Margarite A. Arrighi and Judith C. Young

The purpose of this investigation was to examine the perceptions of preservice and inservice teachers about successful and effective teaching. Two samples of preservice and inservice teachers responded to open-ended questions concerning their perceptions of teaching effectiveness and their own success. The first sample included 224 beginning physical education majors, student teachers, and inservice physical educators who identified 2,003 effective teaching components which were categorized into 20 different instructional factors by the research team. The second sample included 379 inservice and preservice teachers who were asked about their perceptions of successful teaching. Responses were then categorized by source of success: students, self, others’ reactions, or administrative. Results indicated differences in preservice and inservice teachers’ perceptions, suggesting a pattern of socialization into the teacher role. Teacher perceptions of effective and successful teaching reflected concern for student responses. Effectiveness categories identified included teaching strategy, management and organization, content, and personal characteristics. Perception of successful teaching indicated greater concern for self among preservice than inservice teachers.

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Richard I. Tinning

Student teaching as a significant part of the professional development of physical education teachers is implicated in the general failure of teacher education to adequately prepare teachers who can envision a world of schooling that is any different from the present one. This paper argues that the dominant pedagogy of student teaching is inherently conservative, is characterized by technical rationality, and embraces an outmoded view of professional knowledge. The adoption of a critical-inquiry perspective in student teaching is offered as a possible alternative.

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Niki Tsangaridou

The aim of this study was to explore preservice classroom teacher reflection in a physical education teaching and learning environment and to describe how the teachers’ reflections related to their practices. Two preservice classroom teachers voluntarily participated in the study. Data were collected using observations, journals, documents, and interviews and were analyzed inductively (Patton, 1990). Four major themes emerged from the data: (a) the role of reflection, (b) reflection in action and reflection on action, (c) agency for changes in teaching, and (d) nature and focus of reflection. Findings suggested that the two participants considered reflection a necessity in teaching. Student progress and learning was the most powerful agency for changes to the participants’ practices. Results also indicated that the participants’ reflections related to pedagogical, content, and social issues of teaching, as well as pedagogical content knowledge, and that the nature of their reflection was mostly positive across the lessons.

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Terry L. Rizzo and Walter P. Vispoel

This study was conducted to determine the influence of two physical education courses on undergraduate physical educators’ attitudes toward teaching students labeled educable mentally retarded, behavioral disordered, and learning disabled. The two courses, Adapted Physical Education and Physical Education for Children, included 77 and 97 students, respectively. Four strategies for attitudinal change (information, contact, persuasion, and vicarious experience) were emphasized in the former course. Participants in both courses completed the Physical Educators’ Attitude Toward Teaching the Handicapped Questionnaire (PEATH–II) during the first and last days of a 16-week semester. The data were analyzed using a split-plot hierarchical ANOVA design with two between-subjects factors, course type and teacher (nested under course type), and two within-subjects factors, time (pretest and posttest) and handicapping label. Results indicated that attitudes toward teaching students with handicaps improved significantly in the adapted physical education course but not in the other course.

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Ang Chen and Catherine D. Ennis

Research on physical educators’ value orientations has identified five orientations: disciplinary mastery, learning process, self-actualization, social responsibility, and ecological integration. An interpretive research design was used to compare the extent to which 2 physical education teachers’ content differed because of their value orientations. Findings revealed that the 2 teachers established curriculum goals and emphasized aspects of the physical education content that were associated with their individual value orientations. Dan, a learning-process-oriented teacher, stressed teaching students learning skills by breaking down movement skills into simple elements. John, a social-responsibility-oriented teacher, emphasized teaching social responsibility through physical activities. Both teachers viewed learning physical activities as a means to develop students’ analytic or social skills. However, philosophical differences were found in how curricular goals and content were determined. The findings suggest that clarifying teachers’ value orientations should be considered an appropriate initial step in curriculum innovation and change.

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Nicole D. Bolter, Lindsay Kipp and Tyler Johnson

by assessing perceptions of teaching behaviors within the physical education environment and coaching behaviors within youth sport contexts. In this paper, we were particularly interested in perceptions of physical education teachers’ and youth sport coaches’ efforts to teach participants about