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Jence A. Rhoads, Marcos Daou, Keith R. Lohse and Matthew W. Miller

( McKeachie & Kulik, 1975 ). The notion that teaching facilitates the teacher’s learning has been a long accepted assumption in education. Bargh and Schul ( 1980 ) sought to investigate the cognitive benefits of teaching for the teacher. They proposed three stages of the teaching process: (1) preparation for

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Ben D. Kern, Kim C. Graber, Amelia Mays Woods and Tom Templin

The process of teachers making pedagogical change in varying contexts is commonly referred to as teacher change ( Guskey, 2014 ). Pedagogical change is defined as alterations in “instructional resources, teaching approaches, and beliefs about pedagogy theory” ( Fullan, 2007 , p. 30). Teacher change

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Nina Verma, Robert C. Eklund, Calum A. Arthur, Timothy C. Howle and Ann-Marie Gibson

; Howle, Jackson, Conroy, & Dimmock, 2015 ), which we propose may be shaped by school-based physical education (PE) teachers’ use of transformational teaching behavior ( Beauchamp et al., 2010 ). A recent review has highlighted the potential effectiveness of school-based interventions underpinned by

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Shirley Gray, Paul M. Wright, Richard Sievwright and Stuart Robertson

, 2011 ; Taylor, Oberle, Durlak, & Weissberg, 2017 ). It is in the interest of all teachers and their learners therefore to develop knowledge and strategies that might nurture and promote social and emotional learning in schools, and specifically in PE ( Jacobs & Wright, 2014 ). Teaching personal and

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Risto Marttinen, Dillon Landi, Dario Novak and Stephen Silverman

) conducted the last systematic analysis of research on teaching in physical education (RT-PE). In their paper, they identified, coded, and categorized articles from 1980 to 1994. Although Silverman and Skonie’s ( 1997 ) insights were extremely valuable, the field has matured greatly over the past 20+ years

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Kelsey McEntyre, Matthew D. Curtner-Smith and K. Andrew R. Richards

-Smith, & Steffen, 2009 ). Additional and key components of the paradigm include the notion that teaching consists of a series of tasks that operate in each of these systems ( Doyle, 1986 ) and the belief that the quality of task performance is partially dependent on the effectiveness of the formal and informal

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Janice C. Wendt and Linda L. Bain

Physical educators’ perceptions of stressful teaching events do not change over a period of 1 to 5 years of teaching experience. Although there was a trend for priority and teaching function perceptions to be rated lower, no significant differences were found when using a MANOVA. Notification of unsatisfactory performance and being involuntarily transferred were rated the most stressful by both groups. Rated least stressful by both student and novice teachers was attendance at inservice meetings.

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Louis Harrison, Russell L. Carson and Joe Burden

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the common assumption that teachers of color (TOC) are more culturally competent than White teachers by assessing physical education teachers’ cultural competency. A secondary purpose was to ascertain the possible differences in cultural competence levels of White teachers in diverse school settings versus those in more racially homogenous schools. One hundred and ninety physical education teachers from two states in the southeastern U.S. completed a demographic questionnaire and the Multicultural Teaching Competency Scale (MTCS) (Spanierman et al., 2006). The MTCS consists of two subscales; multicultural teaching knowledge (MTK), and multicultural teaching skills (MTS). MANCOVA analyses indicated significant differences with TOC scoring higher in both MTK and MTS than White teachers. Results also indicated that White teachers in city school settings scored significantly higher in MTK than those from more rural school. Results and implications for teacher preparation and professional development are discussed.

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Margarite A. Arrighi and Judith C. Young

The purpose of this investigation was to examine the perceptions of preservice and inservice teachers about successful and effective teaching. Two samples of preservice and inservice teachers responded to open-ended questions concerning their perceptions of teaching effectiveness and their own success. The first sample included 224 beginning physical education majors, student teachers, and inservice physical educators who identified 2,003 effective teaching components which were categorized into 20 different instructional factors by the research team. The second sample included 379 inservice and preservice teachers who were asked about their perceptions of successful teaching. Responses were then categorized by source of success: students, self, others’ reactions, or administrative. Results indicated differences in preservice and inservice teachers’ perceptions, suggesting a pattern of socialization into the teacher role. Teacher perceptions of effective and successful teaching reflected concern for student responses. Effectiveness categories identified included teaching strategy, management and organization, content, and personal characteristics. Perception of successful teaching indicated greater concern for self among preservice than inservice teachers.

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Richard I. Tinning

Student teaching as a significant part of the professional development of physical education teachers is implicated in the general failure of teacher education to adequately prepare teachers who can envision a world of schooling that is any different from the present one. This paper argues that the dominant pedagogy of student teaching is inherently conservative, is characterized by technical rationality, and embraces an outmoded view of professional knowledge. The adoption of a critical-inquiry perspective in student teaching is offered as a possible alternative.