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Jonathan S. Goodwin, Robert A. Creighton, Brian G. Pietrosimone, Jeffery T. Spang and J. Troy Blackburn

Individuals who sustain traumatic joint injuries are at an increased risk of knee osteoarthritis (OA). 1 , 2 Several surgical procedures are performed to repair cartilage following trauma (eg, microfracture, osteochondral allograft transplantation surgery), but their ability to reduce knee OA risk

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Aditi Mankad, Sandy Gordon and Karen Wallman

The present study adopted a qualitative, exploratory approach to describe the underlying emotional climate among injured athletes within team sport environments. Nine elite athletes undergoing long-term injury rehabilitation (LTIR) participated in semi-structured interviews to describe their LTIR experience. A general inductive analysis extracted three higher-order themes: (a) emotional trauma, (b) emotional climate, and (c) emotional acting. Athletes reported experiencing emotional trauma throughout LTIR. To maintain in-group norms, they described engaging in avoidance behaviors and reported suppressing negative affect for fear of negative evaluation. They also reported frequently controlling emotions in public using acting strategies. Athletes perceived these emotionally inhibitive behaviors as encouraged within their team environment. These results have important implications for the identification and treatment of emotionally destructive behaviors that could potentially delay an athlete’s psychological rehabilitation from athletic injury.

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William L. Wang and Aaron V. Mares

Bilateral epidural hematoma is a rare complication of blunt head trauma. Few cases of bilateral epidural hematomas have been described in the literature and there have been no cases that have been described in a college or professional athlete. This case report presents an unusual case of a Division I collegiate football athlete who sustained a bilateral epidural hematoma with parietal skull fracture after falling down a flight of stairs. It highlights the initial presentation to rehabilitation up until eventual return-to-play 4 months later. There were no setbacks or complications in rehabilitation process.

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Maria T. Allison

This paper explores the process of social change and problems that arise in the study of such change in play, sport, and leisure domains. After outlining major theoretical perspectives utilized to describe and explain the nature of change in society, the paper describes several myths, including myths of trauma, unidirectionality, deviance, and semantic illusion (Lauer, 1973), which have inhibited the study of change. Drawing from examples in play, sport, and leisure domains, the author suggests ways in which the study of change can be better integrated into our research consciousness.

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Jordan Anderson and Justin Stanek

Clinical Scenario:

Plantar fasciitis is a debilitating and painful problem present in the general population. It most often presents with moderate to severe pain in the proximal inferior heel region and is most commonly associated with repeated trauma to the plantar fascia. Plantar fasciitis, itself, is an injury at the site of attachment at the medial tubercle of the calcaneus, often due to excessive and repetitive traction. Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain and is estimated to affect 2 million people in the United States alone.

Focused Clinical Question:

For adults suffering from plantar fasciitis, are foot orthoses a viable treatment option to reduce pain?

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Michael J. Asken

This paper discusses the delivery of sport psychology services to physically challenged (disabled) athletes. It begins with a description of the current status of athletic competition for physically disabled individuals. Commonalities in the sports experience of able-bodied and physically disabled athletes are addressed. Unique issues that must be considered for effective sport psychology consultations with disabled athletes are discussed. These include the background of physical and psychological trauma, altered physiological responses and medical problems, complexities in motivation to compete, unique performance problems, and the structure and organization of disabled sports. The article concludes with the effects of the social environment of disabled sports on the consultation process.

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James A. Yaggie and Stephen J. Kinzey

Context:

Ankle bracing has been used for many years in an attempt to prevent lateral ligamentous injuries of the ankle by restricting joint range of motion (ROM).

Objective:

To examine the influence of ankle bracing on ROM and sport-related performance.

Design:

Repeated measures.

Setting:

Biomechanics laboratory.

Participants:

30 volunteers. None reported ankle trauma within 2 years preceding the study or had other orthopedic conditions that would have affected physical performance.

Intervention:

Three brace conditions (McDavid A101™, Perform-8™ Lateral Stabilizer) were assessed during performance of the vertical jump and shuttle run.

Main Outcome Measures:

shuttle-run time, vertical jump height, inversion, and plantar flexion ROM.

Results:

Both braces restricted plantar flexion and inversion ROM and caused no change in shuttle-run time or vertical jump height.

Conclusions:

Our results indicate that bracing the ankle joint increases external lateral support to the joint without significantly restricting functional ability.

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Heather VanOpdorp, Bonnie Van Lunen and James Swanson

Context:

Hip and pelvic injuries are often associated with direct trauma, but spe-cific fractures to the acetabulum are rare. The signs and symptoms of an acetabular fracture can mimic those of conditions that are more common at the hip area, and therefore the specificity of the diagnostic testing is crucial.

Objective:

To present the case of a female Division I college field-hockey player who developed a superomedial acetabular fracture.

Background:

The athlete’s initial complaint of intolerable hip pain decreased after a 3-week rest period but persisted with passive internal and external hip rotation. Additional diagnostic testing was needed to differentiate the various pathologies that were associated with her symptoms.

Conclusions:

Clinicians should be aware of the potential differential diagnoses of the hip and should investigate all potential possibilities even though they might not coincide with the initial injury.

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Richard P. Wells, Patrick J. Bishop and Malcolm Stephens

Spinal cord trauma due to head-first collisions is not uncommon in vehicle accidents, shallow water diving, football, or ice hockey. Two approaches to evaluating potential protective devices for ice hockey are described: an evaluative tool based upon an anthropometric test dummy, and a computer simulation of axial head-first collisions. Helmets reduced the peak cervical spine loads during low velocity head-first collisions by up to 8%. It is shown that large thicknesses of appropriate padding are necessary to hold the cervical spine loads to noninjurious levels. A head-first impact of 3.0 m • sec−1 required padding deformations on the order of 94 mm to hold cervical spine loads below 2,000 N.

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Deborah Butler

This paper contributes new theoretical and empirical knowledge to a relatively under researched area, that of the experience and management of emotions and mental health of sports workers. Set within the field of interspecies sports work this paper uses autophenomenography to demonstrate the application of phenomenology within sociology as both a methodological approach and a theoretical framework. It focuses on the personal and working life of a sports worker in horse racing who, through emotional trauma and mental ill health, loses her ‘feel for the game’ (Bourdieu, 1992), the unconscious bodily dispositions and automatic performance that form an integral part of sports work. It examines how practically embodied attitudes and dispositions can return through working with and exercising racehorses. Using the work of Merleau-Ponty my aim is to explore how human-nonhuman animal intercorporeality acts as a catalyst to regaining a ‘feel for the game.’