Search Results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 727 items for :

  • "young adults" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Susan Shore and Roy J. Shephard

Immune responses have been examined in 11 children aged 10.3 ± 0.6 years before and after 12 weeks of aerobic training. Initial resting data showed high total lymphocyte, CD3+ and CD8+ counts, a low CD4+/CD8+ ratio and a low CD25+ count relative to young adults. Acute exercise (30 min at ventilatory threshold) initially increased CD4+, CD8+, and CD56+ counts, and decreased CD4+/CD8+ ratio, but CD56+ count did not decrease during recovery. After training, relative aerobic power remained unchanged at 50 ±3 ml · kg−1 · min−1. However, resting leukocyte, CD3’ and CD25’ counts were decreased, and acute exercise induced smaller changes in leukocyte and subset counts. We conclude that immune responses to exercise are generally similar in children and young adults.

Restricted access

Cheryl A. Howe, Marcus W. Barr, Brett C. Winner, Jenelynn R. Kimble and Jason B. White

Background:

Although promoted for weight loss, especially in young adults, it has yet to be determined if the physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) and intensity of the newest active video games (AVGs) qualifies as moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA; > 3.0 METs). This study compared the PAEE and intensity of AVGs to traditional seated video games (SVGs).

Methods:

Fifty-three young adults (18−35 y; 27 females) volunteered to play 6 video games (4 AVGs, 2 SVGs). Anthropometrics and resting metabolism were measured before testing. While playing the games (6−10 min) in random order against a playmate, the participants wore a portable metabolic analyzer for measuring PAEE (kcal/min) and intensity (METs). A repeated-measures ANOVA compared the PAEE and intensity across games with sex, BMI, and PA status as main effects.

Results:

The intensity of AVGs (6.1 ± 0.2 METs) was significantly greater than SVGs (1.8 ± 0.1 METs). AVGs elicited greater PAEE than SVGs in all participants (5.3 ± 0.2 vs 0.8 ± 0.0 kcal/min); PAEE during the AVGs was greater in males and overweight participants compared with females and healthy weight participants (p’s < .05).

Conclusions:

The newest AVGs do qualify as MVPA and can contribute to the recommended dose of MVPA for weight management in young adults.

Restricted access

Tishya A. L. Wren and Jack R. Engsberg

The traditional method for normalizing quantitative strength data is to divide force or torque by body mass. We have previously shown that this method is not appropriate for able-bodied children and young adults and that normalization using allometric scaling is more effective. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of applying existing normalization equations for lower extremity strength to children, adolescents, and young adults with cerebral palsy (CP) and, if appropriate, to develop CP-specific normalization equations using allometric scaling. We measured the maximum torque generated during hip abduction/adduction, knee extension/flexion, and ankle dorsiflexion/plantar flexion in 96 subjects with spastic diplegia CP ages 4–23 years. Traditional mass normalization (Torque/Mass1.0) and allometric scaling equations from children without disability (Torque/Mass1.6 for hip and knee; Torque/Mass1.4 for ankle) were not effective in eliminating the influence of body mass. Normalization using CP-specific allometric scaling equations was effective using both muscle-specific and common (Torque/Mass0.8 for ankle plantar flexors; Torque/Mass1.4 for all others) scaling relationships. For the first time, normalization equations have been presented with demonstrated effectiveness in adjusting strength measures for body size in a group of children, adolescents, and young adults with CP.

Restricted access

Babatunde O.A. Adegoke and Adewale L. Oyeyemi

Background:

This study assessed the prevalence of physical inactivity and the influence of sociodemographic variables on physical activity categories, highlighting the correlates of physical inactivity in Nigerian young adults.

Methods:

A representative sample of young adults age 16 to 39 years (n = 1006) from a Nigerian University were categorized using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire as physically inactive, moderately active, and highly active. Prevalence rates were computed for the activity categories and the independent associations of sociodemographic correlates on each category were determined using the multinomial logistic regression.

Results:

Physical inactivity prevalence was 41%. More likely to be inactive were females (OR = 1.93; CI: 1.49−2.49), those of Hausa ethnicity (OR = 2.29; CI: 1.08−5.84), having BMI > 30 kg/m2 (OR = 2.88; CI: 1.16−7.17), and those whose parents’ annual income was < 180,000 NAIRA (OR = 1.69; CI: 1.04−2.95). Less likely to be moderately active were females (OR = 0.71; CI: 0.61−0.95), those with BMI between 25.0 to 29.9 kg/m2 (OR = 0.46; CI: 0.23−0.92), and those of Hausa ethnicity (OR = 0.17; CI: 0.04−0.74).

Conclusion:

Important sociodemographic variables that can contribute to the preliminary analysis of correlates of physical inactivity among Nigerian young adults were identified.

Restricted access

Riggs J. Klika and William G. Thorland

The purpose of this study was to identify physiological determinants of sprint (91.4 m) swimming velocity that discriminated between performance levels in male children (n = 12, age = 10.26 ± 1.00) and in young adult (n = 16, age = 19.78 ± 1.61) competitors. Independent variables included stature, arm length, body mass, body density, body fat, muscularity, leg power, and measures taken during swimming, which included arm stroke force, leg kick force, peak oxygen consumption rate, stroke rate, and stroke efficiency. Discriminant analysis revealed that in the children, higher levels of leg-kick force, peak VO2, stroke efficiency, and muscularity were the most potent variables contributing to the classification of the faster swimmers. In the young adults, higher levels of stroke efficiency, body density, and muscularity, served as the significant discriminators of the faster swimmers. When compared across age groups, these results indicated that substantial differences in stroke efficiency and muscularity significantly accounted for higher performance in these children versus young adult sprint swimmers.

Restricted access

John M. Jakicic, Wendy C. King, Bethany Barone Gibbs, Renee J. Rogers, Amy D. Rickman, Kelliann K. Davis, Abdus Wahed and Steven H. Belle

Background:

To compare moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) assessed via questionnaires to an objective measure of MVPA in overweight or obese young adults.

Methods:

MVPA was assessed in 448 [median BMI = 31.2 (Interquartile Range: 28.5–34.3) kg/m2] young adults [median age: 30.9 (Interquartile Range: 27.8–33.7) years]. Measures included the SenseWear Armband (MVPAOBJ), the Paffenbarger Questionnaire (MVPAPAFF), and the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ). The GPAQ was used to compute total MVPA (MVPAGPAQ-TOTAL) and MVPA from transportation and recreation (MVPAGPAQ-REC).

Results:

The association between MVPAOBJ and MVPAPAFF was r s = 0.40 (P < .0001). Associations between MVPAOBJ and MVPAGPAQ-TOTAL and MVPAGPAQ-REC were r s = 0.19 and r s = 0.32, respectively (P < .0001). MVPAGPAQ-TOTAL was significantly greater than MVPAOBJ (P < .0001). Median differences in MET-min/week between MVPAOBJ and MVPAPAFF or MVPAGPAQ-REC were not significantly different from zero. There was proportional bias between each self-reported measure of MVPA and MVPAOBJ. There were significant associations between all measures of MVPA and fitness. MVPAOBJ was significantly associated with BMI and percent body fat.

Conclusions:

Objective and self-reported measures of MVPA are weakly to moderately correlated, with substantial differences between measures. MVPAOBJ provided predictive validity with fitness, BMI, and percent body fat. Thus, an objective measure of MVPA may be preferred to self-report in young adults.

Restricted access

LeeAnn Kriegh and Mary Jo Kane

Over the past two decades, sport media scholars have demonstrated that female athletes are portrayed in ways that trivialize and undermine their accomplishments as highly skilled competitors, thus denying them power. More recently, scholars in a related field of knowledge—homophobia in women’s athletics—have also addressed the various ways in which power is denied to sportswomen. Although scholars within both bodies of knowledge have investigated institutional structures, ideologies and practices by which men continue to monopolize sport, few studies have explicitly linked sport media scholarship to the literature on homophobia in women’s athlet. An additional limitation in both fields of knowledge is that analyses focused primarily on adult female athletes; examinations of adolescent females are virtually nonexistent. A final limitation is that the vast majority of studies have focused on print and broadcast journalism, thereby ignoring another influential medium, young adult sports fiction. Therefore, the purpose of our investigation was to extend the knowledge base in three ways: 1) to explicitly link two bodies of knowledge concerned with women’s athleticism--sport media and homophobia/heterosexism; 2) to focus on a population that has been sorely neglected; and 3) to investigate a rich new area of analysis-young adult literature-particularly as it relates to the presence, and characterization of, lesbians in sport.

The sample consisted of novels meeting the following criteria: (a) published for a young adult audience, (b) featured a female athlete as protagonist, (c) had sport as a major characteristic of the story, and (d) and be published during or after 1970. Using a qualitative methodology, we examined themes and character portrayals related to the suppression and oppression of young sportswomen in general and lesbians in particular. More specifically, we were interested in whether manifestations of homophobia in women’s athletics (e.g., silence and denial) were present in the novels under consideration. Results indicated that a lesbian presence was subverted in numerous ways, ranging from explicit verbal attacks on female protagonists accused of being “freaks,” to more subtle, apologetic constructions in which female athletes were characterized as ultra-feminine. These findings suggest that the homophobic and heterosexist coverage given to sportswomen in print and broadcast journalism extends into young adult sports fiction.

Restricted access

Sandra K. Knecht, Wayne A. Mays, Yvette M. Gerdes, Randal P. Claytor and Timothy K. Knilans

The aim of this study was to provide a normal reference for arm–leg blood pressure gradients in normal pediatric and young-adult patients before and after exercise. We assessed 216 normal participants by physical or echocardiographic exam, maximally tested using the James Cycle Protocol, with arm and leg blood pressures taken pre- and postexercise. Arm–leg gradients significantly increased from –5 mmHg at rest to 4, 2, and 1 mmHg 1, 3, and 4 min postexercise (p < .05). There was a small, statistically significant increase in arm-leg blood pressure with exercise, which is probably clinically insignificant. These data serve as a normal reference.

Restricted access

Ana Marie Varela and Kenneth H. Pitetti

The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to determine the reflexive HR responses of 10 young adults (mean age = 18.6 ± 3 years) with Down syndrome (DS) to short, intense field tests, and (b) to compare the HR responses of the subjects in this study to previous studies that reported peak HR responses of young adults with DS during maximal treadmill exercise tests. Each subject performed a 300-yd (274-m) run and the Leger and Lambert shuttle run twice on separate days. Heart rates were recorded by telemetry every 50 yd (45.7 m) during the 300-yd run and every minute for the shuttle run. The mean HRs seen throughout both field tests were equal to or higher than peak HRs previously reported. The peak HRs observed were 10 to 30 bpm higher than those peak HRs previously reported for persons with DS of similar age during a maximal treadmill exercise test. The results of this study suggest that low peak HRs may not be specific or unique to the condition of DS.

Restricted access

Michael F. Joseph, Jeffrey M. Anderson, Thomas H. Trojian and John Crowley

Context:

Achilles tendon rupture is often the result of a long-term degenerative process, frequently occurring asymptomatically.

Objective:

To determine the prevalence of asymptomatic Achilles tendinopathy in an active, asymptomatic, young-adult population and to compare these findings across gender.

Design:

Convenience sample, cohort study.

Setting:

Research laboratory

Participants:

A sample of 52 (28 male, 24 female) healthy, active subjects were recruited from the student body at the University of Connecticut. Images of 104 Achilles tendons were made.

Intervention:

Ultrasound images made with a Phillips HD11 with a 15-MHz real-time linear-array transducer were collected on both the longitudinal and transverse axes of the Achilles tendon. Activity level was measured with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire Short Form (IPAQ-SF).

Main Outcome Measure:

Presence of ultrasound evidence of Achilles tendinopathy as agreed on by 2 blinded assessors highly skilled in ultrasonography.

Results:

More subjects were categorized as highly active (57.4%) on the IPAQ-SF than moderately active (42.6%). One female and one male subject were found to have ultrasound evidence of asymptomatic Achilles tendinopathy, equaling 3.8% prevalence in this study.

Conclusion:

We found a low prevalence of asymptomatic Achilles tendinopathy in an active, young-adult population. Further work is necessary to identify an optimal group warranting ultrasound screening for asymptomatic tendinopathy.