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Byron L. Zamboanga, Nathan T. Kearns, Janine V. Olthuis, Heidemarie Blumenthal and Renee M. Cloutier

. Table 1 Demographics, General Alcohol Consumption, and Drinking Game Behaviors at Timepoints 1 and 2 Variable Timepoint 1 (T1) Timepoint 2 (T2) Age (in years) 20.35 ± 1.07 21.18 ± 0.97  Range 18–23 19–24 Race/Ethnicity  Asian 2 (4.1%)    African-American 1 (2.0%)    White/Caucasian 42 (85

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Kendahl Shortway, Marina Oganesova and Andrew Vincent

, &Tillman, 2009 ; Lindquist, Crosby, Barrick, Krebs, & Settles-Reaves, 2016 ; Tillman, Bryant-Davis, Smith, & Marks, 2010 ). Reasons identified for not disclosing sexual assault include stigmatization of African American female sexuality and apprehension regarding racist reactions, as well as the reasons

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Robert C. Hilliard, Lorenzo A. Redmond and Jack C. Watson II

.25). The sample consisted primarily of athletes who were in their first year ( n  = 98) of college, followed by second year ( n  = 68) third year ( n  = 35), fourth year ( n  = 33) and fifth year ( n  = 9). The student-athletes identified primarily (82%) as White/Caucasian, with 8% identifying as Black/African

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Jeannine Ohlert, Thea Rau and Marc Allroggen

. , Myers , H.F. , & Wyatt , G.E. ( 2011 ). Childhood sexual abuse severity and disclosure as predictors of depression among adult African-American and Latina women . The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 199 ( 7 ), 471 – 477 . PubMed ID: 21716061 doi:10.1097/NMD.0b013e31822142ac 10.1097/NMD

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J.D. DeFreese, Travis E. Dorsch and Travis A. Flitton

remaining participants self-identifying as Black or African-American (1.4%), more than one race (1.4%), Asian (0.5%) or offering no response (1.4%). Participants reported, on average, 2.7 children ( SD  =1.1) under the age of 21 residing in the household, with 2.3 of them participating in organized youth

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Leilani A. Madrigal, Vincenzo Roma, Todd Caze, Arthur Maerlender and Debra Hope

.5  African American 17 6.3 16 5.9  Asian American or Pacific Islander 11 4.1 13 4.8  Latino 13 2.7 6 2.2  Multiethnic 12 4.4 21 7.7  Native American/Other 6 2.2 5 1.8 Education  Advanced degree 47 17.3 37 13.7  College graduate 122 45.0 120 44.3  Some College 83 30.6 92 33.9  High School Equivalency or Lower

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Sheryl Miller and Mary Fry

were invited to complete a survey three weeks prior to the end of the semester. Of the participants, 79% identified as Caucasian/White, with the remaining being African American/Black (6.3%), Hispanic/Latino (4.7%), Asian/Pacific Island (4.0%), Native American (.9%), and other (5%). The majority of

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Graig M. Chow, Matthew D. Bird, Stinne Soendergaard and Yanyun Yang

, n women’s only  = 30, n both  = 38), and men’s and women’s track and field ( n men’s only  = 11, n women’s only  = 14, n both  = 76). Coaches were 44.81 years of age on average ( SD  = 12.12, range  = 23–75), and identified as being Caucasian ( n  = 467), African American ( n  = 19), Hispanic

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K. Andrew R. Richards, Wesley J. Wilson, Steven K. Holland and Justin A. Haegele

 = 11.63) and had been teaching for 16.01 years ( SD  = 10.79). They primarily self-identified their race/ethnicity as European American ( n  = 212; 89.50%), with fewer individuals self-identifying as African American ( n  = 10; 4.20%), Hispanic ( n  = 8; 3.40%), more than one race/ethnicity ( n  = 5; 2

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Shelby Waldron, J.D. DeFreese, Brian Pietrosimone, Johna Register-Mihalik and Nikki Barczak

years old ( SD  = 1.45) for late specializers. For specialization group demographics see Table  1 . The majority of participants self-identified as female ( n  = 202, 83.1%), non-Hispanic ( n  = 223, 91.8%), and Caucasian ( n  = 199, 81.9%). The remaining participants self-identified as Black/African