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Hyung Joon Joo, Sang-A Cho, Jae-Young Cho, Seunghun Lee, Jae Hyung Park, Cheol Woong Yu, Soon Jun Hong and Do-Sun Lim

Background:

Although the relationship between physical activity and arterial stiffness has been shown in healthy persons, it remains controversial in obese persons.

Methods:

From January 2014 to September 2014, we evaluated 795 obese subjects from 25 public health centers in Seoul, Korea. We compared physical activity and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) between obese subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS) (MO) and obese subjects without MetS (NMO).

Results:

The MO group had more men, higher body mass index (BMI), higher fasting glucose level, lower high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol level, and higher triglyceride level. The mean physical activity levels were similar between the 2 groups. baPWV was higher in the MO group than the NMO group. MO group showed positive correlation between baPWV and physical activity (P trend = 0.04). Interestingly, baPWV was significantly higher in the MO group than in the NMO group in subjects with moderate and vigorous physical activity (1403.4 cm/sec vs 1349 cm/sec [95% CI 21.4 to 87.4], P < .05). Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated that brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was apparently associated with age, BMI, blood pressure, and glucose level.

Conclusions:

In a community-based population, baPWV was higher in obese MetS group compared with obese non-MetS group. Physical activity showed different association with baPWV depending on metabolic status.

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Daniel Arvidsson, Ulf Lindblad, Jan Sundquist, Kristina Sundquist, Leif Groop and Louise Bennet

Purpose:

To compare physical activity measures and their associations with insulin sensitivity, β-cell function and body mass index (BMI) between Iraqi immigrants and native Swedes.

Methods:

A cross-sectional study of 493 Iraqis (58% men) and 469 Swedes (54% men) aged 30 to 75 years living in the city of Malmö, Sweden. Accelerometry was used for physical activity measures (sedentary time, breaks in sedentary time, moderate and vigorous physical activity, total counts). Insulin sensitivity index and oral disposal index were determined from an oral glucose tolerance test and BMI by body weight and height.

Results:

Iraqi men were less physically active than Swedish men, while the physical activity was more similar in the women. BMI was a strong predictor of insulin sensitivity and β-cell function and frequently associated with the physical activity measures. BMI modified the associations of insulin sensitivity and β-cell function with the physical activity measures to such extent that only VPA and total counts show direct associations with insulin sensitivity in addition to the indirect associations via BMI. Iraqi women demonstrated weaker associations compared with Swedish women.

Conclusions:

Physical activity and performed at vigorous intensity may be important mainly for the insulin sensitivity in Iraqi immigrants and native Swedes.

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Kathleen Y. Wolin, Daniel P. Heil, Sandy Askew, Charles E. Matthews and Gary G. Bennett

Background:

The International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form (IPAQ-S) has been evaluated against accelerometer-determined physical activity measures in small homogenous samples of adults in the United States. There is limited information about the validity of the IPAQ-S in diverse US samples.

Methods:

142 Blacks residing in low-income housing completed the IPAQ-S and wore an accelerometer for up to 6 days. Both 1- and 10-minute accelerometer bouts were used to define time spent in light, moderate, and vigorous physical activity.

Results:

We found fair agreement between the IPAQ-S and accelerometer-determined physical activity (r = .26 for 10-minute bout, r = .36 for 1-minute bout). Correlations were higher among men than women. When we classified participants as meeting physical activity recommendations, agreement was low (kappa = .04, 10-minute; kappa = .21, 1-minute); only 25% of individuals were classified the same by both instruments (10-minute bout).

Conclusions:

In one of the few studies to assess the validity of a self-reported physical activity measure among Blacks, we found moderate correlations with accelerometer data, though correlations were weaker for women. Correlations were smaller when IPAQ-S data were compared using a 10- versus a 1-minute bout definition. There was limited evidence for agreement between the instruments when classifying participants as meeting physical activity recommendations.

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George Antonogeorgos, Anastasios Papadimitriou, Demosthenes B. Panagiotakos, Kostas N. Priftis and Polyxeni Nikolaidou

Background:

Childhood obesity has become a modern epidemic with escalating rates. The aim of our study was to identify physical activity patterns among Greek schoolchildren and to examine their relationship with obesity.

Methods:

700 adolescents age 10 to 12 years were evaluated through a standardized questionnaire. Several demographic, socioeconomic, and physical activity characteristics were recorded. Physical activity was assessed and adolescents were characterized as active and nonactive. Body height and weight were measured and body mass index was calculated in order to to classify subjects as overweight or obese (IOTF classification). Multiple logistic regression and multivariate techniques (principal components analysis) were performed.

Results:

Eight physical activity patterns were identified, including increased physical activity in weekdays and weekends, sports physical activity, vigorous, moderate, and low physical activity. Increased physical activity on weekends and vigorous physical activity in boys were negatively associated with being overweight or obese (OR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.48−0.90 and OR: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.49−0.88, correspondingly) and moderate physical activity was marginally positively associated in girls (OR: 1.28; 95% CI: 0.97−1.69), after adjusting for several confounders.

Conclusions:

Our findings demonstrate the important role of vigorous physical activity in the maintenance of normal weight of adolescents

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Christopher Coutts, Timothy Chapin, Mark Horner and Crystal Taylor

Background:

Parks and other forms of green space are among the key environmental supports for recreational physical activity. Measurements of green space access have provided mixed results as to the influence of green space access on physical activity.

Methods:

This cross-sectional study uses a geographical information system (GIS) to examine the relationships between the amount of and distance to green space and county-level (n = 67) moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in the state of Florida.

Results:

The gross amount of green space in a county (P < .05) and the amount of green space within defined distances of where people live (1/4 mile, P < .01; 1/2 mile, P < .05; 1 mile, P < .01) were positively associated with self-reported levels of MVPA. Distance to the nearest green space and the amount of green space furthest from where people live (10 miles) were not significantly associated with MVPA. All measures were weighted by the population living in census tracts.

Conclusions:

The results suggest that there is an association between the accessibility created by having more green space closer to home and MVPA, but this holds only for areas up to and including 1 mile from home.

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Kylie Ball, Verity J. Cleland, Anna F. Timperio, Jo Salmon and David A. Crawford

Background:

This study aimed to examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between socioeconomic position (SEP) and physical activity and sedentary behaviors among children and adolescents.

Methods:

Maternal education was reported by parents of 184 children 5 to 6 years old and 358 children 10 to 12 years old in 2001. In 2001 and 2004, physical activity was assessed by accelerometry. Older children self-reported and parents of younger children proxy-reported physical activity and TV-viewing behaviors. Linear regression was used to predict physical activity and sedentary behaviors, and changes in these behaviors, from maternal education.

Results:

Among all children, accelerometer-determined and self- or parent-reported moderate and vigorous physical activity declined over 3 years. Girls of higher SEP demonstrated greater decreases in TV-viewing behaviors than those of low SEP. In general, no prospective associations were evident between SEP and objectively assessed physical activity. A small number of prospective associations were noted between SEP and self-reported physical activity, but these were generally weak and inconsistent in direction.

Conclusions:

This study did not find strong evidence that maternal education was cross-sectionally or longitudinally predictive of children’s physical activity or sedentary behaviors. Given the well-documented inverse relationship of SEP with physical activity levels in adult samples, the findings suggest that such disparities might emerge after adolescence.

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David Claxton and Gayle M. Wells

Background:

This study examined the effect of using physical activity homework on physical activity levels of college students.

Methods:

Students in randomly assigned sections of a university health course were assigned 30 minutes of physical activity homework 3 days a week or no homework for 12 weeks. Participants completed self-reports of physical activity before the homework intervention and again at the conclusion of the 12 weeks of physical activity homework.

Results:

Participants in all course sections reported significant increases in the number of days per week of moderate and vigorous physical activity. Participants in homework sections additionally showed significant increases in the days they engaged in muscular strength/endurance training and activities to manage weight. Participants in sections without homework showed a significant increase in the number of days engaged in flexibility training. Comparison of gain scores showed statistically significant increases by the homework group in the days they participated in activities designed to manage weight.

Conclusion:

Physical activity homework was deemed to be an effective method of increasing college students’ levels of physical activity.

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Lisa M. Quintiliani, Marci K. Campbell, J. Michael Bowling, Susan Steck, Pamela S. Haines and Brenda M. DeVellis

Background:

A better understanding of identifying tailoring variables would improve message design. Tailoring to a behavior that a participant selects as one they would like to work on may increase message relevance, and thus effectiveness. This trial compared 3 groups: message tailored to physical activity as a participant-selected topic (choice), message tailored to physical activity as an expert-determined topic (expert), or nontailored message (comparison).

Methods:

408 female college students received web-delivered computer-tailored messages on physical activity. Outcomes were immediate and 1-month follow-up changes in psychosocial, goal-related, and behavioral variables related to physical activity.

Results:

Participants were predominately non-Hispanic White (73.8%). Change in self-efficacy and goal commitment at immediate follow-up and vigorous physical activity at 1-month follow-up was greater in the expert versus comparison group. Change in goal commitment at immediate follow-up was lower in the choice versus expert group. In the expert group, those choosing physical activity as their selected topic perceived the goal to be easier at immediate follow-up compared with those receiving unmatched messages.

Conclusions:

Findings supported tailoring to an expert-determined topic. However, based on the beneficial change in perceived goal difficulty when topics matched, future research should encourage synchrony between participant-selected topics and expert recommendations.

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Diane M. DellaValle and Jere D. Haas

The objective of this study was to determine the impact of iron depletion without anemia on performance in a sample of female collegiate rowers at the beginning of a training season (August 2008, January 2009, and September 2009). One hundred sixty-five female collegiate rowers from 5 colleges and universities in central New York State participated in a screening of iron status. Blood hemoglobin (Hgb), serum ferritin (sFer), and soluble transferrin receptor were measured to determine prevalence of iron depletion and anemia. Rowers’ habitual moderate and vigorous physical activity, as well as their best time to complete a 2-km simulated race during the previous 3 months, were self-reported. Sixteen rowers (10%) were identified as anemic (Hgb <12.0 g/dl). Using a sFer cutoff of <20.0 μg/L, 30% (n = 44) of the nonanemic rowers were identified as iron depleted without anemia and reported 2-km times ~21 s slower (p < .004) than rowers with normal iron status. Given the high prevalence of iron depletion reported in this and other studies, screening for low iron stores at the start of a training program in female athletes involved in an endurance sport may be clinically useful. In this study, irondepleted rowers (sFer <20–25 μg/L) reported a decrease in performance time compared with those with normal iron stores.

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Koichiro Oka and Ai Shibata

Background:

Dog ownership appears to have associated health benefits as a result of increased physical activity through dog walking. This study examined the association between dog ownership and health-related physical activity among Japanese adults.

Methods:

Male and female respondents to an Internet-based cross-sectional survey were divided into the following groups: dog owner (DOG), nondog pet owner (NDOG), and nonpet owner (NPOG). Moderate and vigorous physical activity amount (MVPA), walking amount (Walking), and sedentary behavior time (SB) were estimated from the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Analyses of covariance and logistic regression analysis were used.

Results:

The differences in MVPA, Walking, and SB were statistically significant among the three groups. DOG had a significantly greater amount of MVPA than NDOG and NPOG. DOG also had a significantly greater amount of Walking and less SB time than NPOG, and DOG was 1.5 times more likely to meet the physical activity recommendation than NDOG and NPOG.

Conclusions:

The dog owners had higher physical activity levels than owners of other kinds of pets and those without any pets, suggesting that dogs may play a major role in promoting physical activity. However, only 30% of the dog owners met the recommended criteria for physical activity.