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P. David Howe and Carwyn Jones

In recent years the International Paralympic Committee (IPC), the institution responsible for the administration, organization, and management of the Paralympic Games, has reshaped the landscape of sport for the disabled. This article argues that the IPC has marginalized the practice community, notably the International Organizations of Sport for the Disabled. By wrestling away control of the classification systems developed by these organizations, the IPC has transformed them to such an extent that they fail to provide opportunities for equitable sporting practice and the result has been a threat to the ideology of Paralympism. We illustrate this by examining two classification systems that are currently used within Paralympic Sport: the integrated functional system employed in the sport of swimming and the disability-specific system used within athletics.

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Raquel Aparicio-Ugarriza, Raquel Pedrero-Chamizo, María del Mar Bibiloni, Gonzalo Palacios, Antoni Sureda, Agustín Meléndez-Ortega, Josep Antoni Tur Marí and Marcela González-Gross

. 19 These different terminologies and measurement types do not facilitate a standardized classification. Specifically in older adults, several have shown that the amount of PA performed is not the most accurate method for defining the physical condition of older people and, accordingly, their ability

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Sarah J. Woodruff, Connie Bothwell-Myers, Maureen Tingley and Wayne J. Albert

The purpose was to develop an index of walking performance and to examine gait pattern classifications of children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). The San Diego database (Sutherland, Olshen, Biden, & Wyatt, 1988) provided data for our calculation of the index and for determining that the index was able to differentiate between gait variables of older (ages 3 to 7) and younger (ages 1 to 2.5) children comprising the database. We obtained cinematographical data on 17 biomechanical markers of 6 boys and 1 girl, ages 6 to 7, with DCD, during walking. Analysis of individuals with DCD gait patterns revealed that most had abnormal walking patterns. The means of the time/distance gait variables did not differ between children with DCD and San Diego children, ages 3 to 7. Children with DCD had much larger variances than other children, indicating no systematic pattern in individual gait differences.

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Frank L. Gardner and Zella E. Moore

In response to the absence of a taxononomical system for the structured assessment, conceptualization, and intervention of athlete-clients, the MCS-SP is a model for the comprehensive evaluation of athlete-clients’ needs, strategies for in-depth case conceptualization, and systematic formulation of the most appropriate type and level of professional service required. This classification system is based on the primary issues, needs, and life circumstances of the athlete-client and the suggested assessment and intervention foci combine the environmental, interpersonal, intrapersonal, behavioral, and performance history/demands that impact athletic clientele. Categories within the taxonomy include Performance Development, Performance Dysfunction, Performance Impairment, and Performance Termination, each of which include two subtypes that further guide the appropriate, ethical, and effective provision of services.

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Duane Knudson

Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) codes were designed to report outcomes in higher education by specific disciplines and professions, however, universities, states, and accreditation bodies also use these codes in other ways. This paper describes CIP-2010 usage in higher education and how these codes are used in funding public universities in Texas, and summarizes the American Kinesiology Association/National Academy of Kinesiology recommendations to the National Center for Education Statistics on updating kinesiology-related CIP codes. Kinesiology leaders should be knowledgeable about how CIP codes are often used behind the scenes in a variety of ways that affect our faculty, programs, and the field. Greater use of the term kinesiology in many future CIP codes would benefit the field and individual departments seeking alignment with institutional priorities.

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Alysha Hyde, Luke Hogarth, Mark Sayers, Emma Beckman, Mark J. Connick, Sean Tweedy and Brendan Burkett

Purpose:

To quantify the influence of the assistive pole, seat configuration, and upper-body and trunk strength on seated-throwing performance in athletes with a spinal-cord injury (SCI).

Methods:

Ten Paralympic athletes competing in wheelchair rugby, basketball, or athletics (seated throws) participated in 2 randomized sessions: seated throwing and strength tests. Participants threw a club from a custom-built throwing chair, with and without a pole. 3D kinematic data were collected (150 Hz) for both conditions using standardized and self-selected seat configurations. Dominant and nondominant grip strength were measured using a dynamometer, and upper-body and trunk strength were measured using isometric contractions against a load cell.

Results:

Seated throwing with an assistive pole resulted in significantly higher hand speed at release than throwing without a pole (pole = 6.0 ± 1.5 m/s, no pole = 5.3 ± 1.5 m/s; P = .02). There was no significant difference in hand speed at release between standardized and self-selected seating configurations during seated throwing with or without an assistive pole. Grip strength (r = .59–.77), push/pull synergy (r = .81–.84), and trunk-flexion (r = .50–.58) strength measures showed large and significant correlations with hand speed at release during seated throwing with and without an assistive pole.

Conclusions:

This study has demonstrated the importance of the pole for SCI athletes in seated throwing and defined the relationship between strength and seated-throwing performance, allowing us to better understand the activity of seated throws and provide measures for assessing strength that may be valid for evidence-based classification.

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Sean M. Tweedy

Development of a unified classification system to replace four of the systems currently used in disability athletics (i.e., track and field) has been widely advocated. The definition and purpose of classification, underpinned by taxonomic principles and collectively endorsed by relevant disability sport organizations, have not been developed but are required for successful implementation of a unified system. It is posited that the International classification of functioning, disability, and health (ICF), published by the World Health Organization (2001), and current disability athletics systems are, fundamentally, classifications of the functioning and disability associated with health conditions and are highly interrelated. A rationale for basing a unified disability athletics system on ICF is established. Following taxonomic analysis of the current systems, the definition and purpose of a unified disability athletics classification are proposed and discussed. The proposed taxonomic framework and definitions have implications for other disability sport classification systems.

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Beatriz M. Crespo-Ruiz, Antonio J. Del Ama-Espinosa and ángel M. Gil-Agudo

The objective was to conduct a methodological pilot study to analyze wheelchair propulsion upper limb kinematics in standard competitive play considering the functional classification of each athlete. Ten basketball players with a functional classification ranging from 1 to 4 were included in the study. Four camcorders (Kinescan-IBV) and a treadmill for wheelchairs were used. Temporal parameters were analyzed and the upper limb kinematics was obtained using ISB recommendations. The value of the temporal parameters such as push phase duration, the ratio of push phase/recovery phase, contact, and propulsion angle seems to reduce as the functional classification increases. A methodological protocol has been developed that allows the analysis of kinematic characteristics of wheelchair propulsion in basketball players taking into account their functional classification.

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Tim L.A. Doyle, Ronald W. Davis, Brendan Humphries, Eric L. Dugan, Bryon G. Horn, Jae Kun Shim and Robert U. Newton

A number of researchers have long questioned systems used for classifying athletes with disabilities. Wheelchair basketball players have gained much attention from researchers. Despite this, no change to the NWBA classification system has been made since it was first adopted in 1984. This study investigated the NWBA classification system. At two summer basketball camps, 46 players were tested to assess player sprint performance and stratification under the NWBA medical classification system. The group consisted of Class 1, 2, and 3 players. Electronic timing gates were used to collect 20 meter sprint-times. Results indicate that Class 1 players were significantly slower compared to Class 2 and 3 players (p < .05) with no difference between Class 2 and 3. The results of this study support a change to this system.

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Bartosz Molik, Elżbieta Lubelska, Andrzej Kosmol, Magdalena Bogdan, Abu B. Yilla and Ewelina Hyla

The purpose of the study was to examine the offensive game efficiency of elite wheelchair rugby players with regard to their International Wheelchair Rugby Federation (IWRF) classification. Male athletes (105) representing 12 European nations competing at the 2005 European Wheelchair Rugby Championships took part in this study. The primary recording instrument was the Game Efficiency Sheet (GES), an instrument designed to objectively record parameters of wheelchair rugby efficiency such as points scored, steals, turnovers, balls caught (%), and balls passed (%). Kruskal-Wallis between groups analyses identified significant differences among the lower classification groups (0.5–2.0) and between the lower and higher classification (2.5–3.5) groups. Further research is needed in identifying game efficiency differences in higher class groups.