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Kenneth L. Knight, Jody B. Brucker, Paul D. Stoneman and Mack D. Rubley

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Kevin Guskiewicz

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Susan Y. Kwiecien, Malachy P. McHugh, Stuart Goodall, Kirsty M. Hicks, Angus M. Hunter and Glyn Howatson

practical perspective, this cryotherapy modality offers an attractive alternative to CWI, as individuals can resume activities of daily living while simultaneously receiving cryotherapy treatment that maintains a constant temperature for an extended duration. A 6-hour PCM application reduced pain and

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Kavin K.W. Tsang, Barton P. Buxton, W. Kent Guion, A. Barry Joyner and Kathy D. Browder

The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in skin temperature during ice application through a dry towel and a dry elastic bandage compared to application on bare skin. Nine subjects completed a 30-min treatment session that consisted of 0.68 kg of cubed ice applied under three conditions: through a dry towel, through a dry elastic bandage, and directly on the skin (control). Following the removal of the ice, all subjects were monitored for 20-min for skin temperature (S temp). There was a significant interaction in S temp between the control (12.50 ± 4.39 °C) and dry towel (23.48 ± 2.88 °C) conditions, the control (12.50 ± 4.39 °C) and dry elastic wrap (27.47 ± 2.36 °C) conditions, and the dry towel (23.48 ± 2.88 °C) and dry elastic wrap (27.47 ± 2.36 °C) conditions. The findings indicated that using a barrier (dry towel or dry elastic bandage) limits the temperature-reducing capacity of the ice and therefore its potential physiological effects.

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Susan G. Capps and Mayberry Brook

Edited by Tricia Hubbard

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James G. Snyder, Jatin P. Ambegaonkar and Jason B. Winchester

Edited by Joe J. Piccininni

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Jeffrey A. Borgmeyer, Bradley A. Scott and Jerry L. Mayhew

Context:

The effect of ice massage on muscle-strength performance is equivocal.

Objective:

To determine the effects of ice massage on maximum isokinetic torque produced during a 20-minute interval.

Design:

Participants performed a maximal isokinetic contraction of the right arm at 30°/s every 2 minutes for 20 minutes, once after a 10-minute ice massage over the right biceps brachii muscle belly and once without ice treatment. Sessions were randomized.

Participants:

11 college men.

Measurements:

Torque was measured with a Cybex® II dynamometer. Biceps skinfold was measured with a Harpenden caliper.

Results:

A repeated-measures ANCOVA revealed no significant interaction between time and treatment condition when the effect of skinfold thickness was held constant. A main effect for time indicated that torque production was significantly higher at 4 and 8 minutes and declined thereafter.

Conclusions:

A 10-minute ice massage neither enhanced nor retarded muscle-force output and thus may be used for its pain-reducing effect to allow resistance exercise during the rehabilitation process

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Eric Winters, Steven Doty and Sean Newell

Objective:

To explore changes in bovine Achilles-tendon elasticity relative to 3 thermal conditions.

Design and Setting:

Posttest-only design with assignment by convenience. Manufactured-apparatus-clamped excised tendon, delivered tensile stress, and provided strain measures. Stress was increased at 1-minute intervals. Strain was observed for each level of stress. Before testing, cold-group tendons were submerged in cold water for 20 minutes. Heat-group tendons were tested in the presence of an ultraviolet lamp. A third group of tendons was tested at room temperature.

Subjects:

Frozen bovine Achilles tendons provided by a meat-rendering factory and segmented into 3 longitudinal strips.

Measurements:

Stress and strain were sequentially measured. Elastic region was identified, elastic-region Young's modulus determined, and elastic limit calculated.

Results:

Young's modulus for cold was 0.956 gigapascal (GPa; ± 0.0621); room temperature, 0.753 GPa (± 0.0624); and heat group, 0.487 GPa (± 0.0407). Significant differences were identified between each of the 3 conditions.

Conclusions:

A direct relationship was observed between imposed thermal energy and tendon elasticity. Thermal energy does not affect the elastic limit.

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B. Andrew Krause., J. Ty Hopkins, Christopher D. Ingersoll, Mitchell L. Cordova and Jeffrey E. Edwards

Objective:

Correlate skin temperature and motoneuron-pool recruitment during cooling and rewarming.

Design:

Within-subjects, correlational analysis. H reflex was correlated to ankle-skin temperature over time using a Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient and a coefficient of determination (R2).

Subjects:

Ten healthy, physically active college students.

Measurements:

Soleus H reflex and ankle-skin interface temperature were measured during ice application and rewarming. Electrical stimulation was delivered to produce 75% of each subject's maximum H reflex.

Results:

Ankle cooling (r = −.95, P < .05) exhibited a strong inverse relationship with soleus H reflex. A positive correlation was observed between rewarming (r = .74, P < .05) and soleus H reflex.

Conclusions:

Temperature accounts for nearly 90% (R2 = .90) of the variability in the soleus H reflex during cooling and 55% (R2 = .55) during rewarming, suggesting that more motoneurons are recruited as temperature decreases. These interactions appear to involve both local and central nervous system functions.

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Haydee G. Galvan, Amanda J. Tritsch, Richard Tandy and Mack D. Rubley

Context:

Ice-bath temperatures range from 1 to 15ºC; the pain response during treatment might be temperature specific.

Objective:

To determine levels of perceived pain during ice-bath immersion at distinct temperatures.

Design:

2 (sex) × 3 (temperature) × 9 (treatment time).

Setting:

Athletic training research laboratory.

Participants:

32 healthy subjects.

Intervention:

Ankle immersion in 1, 10, and 15°C ice baths for 20 minutes.

Main Outcome Measures:

Discomfort measured by the Borg scale of perceived pain at immersion for 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 15, and 20 minutes.

Results:

The magnitude of pain felt depended on treatment temperature (F 18,522 = 11.65, P < .0001). Pain ratings were 43% higher for 1ºC than 10ºC and 70% higher than 15ºC, and ratings at 10ºC were 46% higher than at 15ºC.

Conclusions:

Pain depends on treatment temperature. Patients might report inconsistent pain ratings with varying temperature.