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Lauree M. Grubbs

Women, considering swimming as a form of exercise to lose weight, have been discouraged from doing so, since researchers suggest that swimming does not burn fat as efficiently as land exercise. The purpose of this study was to compare carbohydrate and fat utilization by women engaging in two different forms of exercise, walking and swimming, at the same intensity and duration. Subjects were 20 moderately trained female subjects, walkers (W) = 10 and swimmers (S) = 10; ages 18-40 years. Measurements of blood free fatty acids (FFA), glycerol, lactate, glucose, free fatty acid turnover (FFAT), respiratory quotient (RQ), and fat oxidation were made during 60 minutes of walking or swimming at the same exercise intensity. Multivariate analysis of variance determined no significant differences between groups in net energy expenditure (NEE), RQ, fat oxidation, blood FFA, glycerol, glucose, and FFAT(p > .05). There was a significant difference between groups in blood lactic acid levels (p < .01). Since it was found that swimming and walking at the same duration and intensity bum similar amounts of fat and carbohydrate as energy sources during exercise, women may find swimming to be a viable form of exercise for weight control.

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Mathieu L. Maltais, Karine Perreault, Alexandre Courchesne-Loyer, Jean-Christophe Lagacé, Razieh Barsalani and Isabelle J. Dionne

The decrease in resting energy expenditure (REE) and fat oxidation with aging is associated with an increase in fat mass (FM), and both could be prevented by exercise such as resistance training. Dairy consumption has also been shown to promote FM loss in different subpopulations and to be positively associated with fat oxidation. Therefore, we sought to determine whether resistance exercise combined with dairy supplementation could have an additive impact on FM and energy metabolism, especially in individuals with a deficit in muscle mass. Twenty-six older overweight sarcopenic men (65 ± 5 years old) were recruited for the study. They participated in 4 months of resistance exercise and were randomized into three groups for postexercise shakes (control, dairy, and nondairy isocaloric and isoprotein supplement with 375 ml and ~280 calories per shake). Body composition was measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry and REE by indirect calorimetry. Fasting glucose, insulin, leptin, inflammatory profile, and blood lipid profile were also measured. Significant decreases were observed with FM only in the dairy supplement group; no changes were observed for any other variables. To conclude, FM may decrease without changes in metabolic parameters during resistance training and dairy supplementation with no caloric restriction without having any impact on metabolic properties. More studies are warranted to explain this significant decrease in FM.

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Holden S-H. MacRae and Kari M. Mefferd

We investigated whether 6 wk of antioxidant supplementation (AS) would enhance 30 km time trial (TT) cycling performance. Eleven elite male cyclists completed a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study to test the effects of twice daily AS containing essential vitamins plus quercetin (FRS), and AS minus quercetin (FRS-Q) versus a baseline TT (B). MANOVA analysis showed that time to complete the 30 km TT was improved by 3.1% on FRS compared to B (P ≤ 0.01), and by 2% over the last 5 km (P ≤ 0.05). Absolute and relative (%HRmax) heart rates and percent VO2max were not different between trials, but average and relative power (% peak power) was higher on FRS (P ≤ 0.01). Rates of carbohydrate and fat oxidation were not different between trials. Thus, FRS supplementation significantly improved high-intensity cycling TT performance through enhancement of power output. Further study is needed to determine the potential mechanism(s) of the antioxidant efficacy.

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R. Scott Van Zant

Maintenance of a healthy body weight results from equating total enegy intake to total energy expenditure (resting metabolic rate, RMR, the thermic effect of feeding, TEF; the thermic effect of activity, TEA, and adaptive thermogenesis, AT). Dietary quantity and composition and acute and chrvnic exercise have been shown to influence all components of total energy expenditure. This paper reviews the effects of exercise and diet on energy expenditure and, ultimately, energy balance. Overnutrition increases RMR and TEF while undernutrition decreases them. Carbohydrate and protein oxidation is closely tied to intake whereas fat oxidation does not closely parallel fat intake. Thus excess fat intake is likely to lead to fat storage. Acute endurance exercise at >70% VO2max increases postexercise RMR and TEF. Chronic exercise training may increase RMR while also increasing TEF. Review of the research indicates that energy balance may best be achieved by consuming an energy appropriate, low fat diet complemented by endurance exercise.

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Eric T. Poehlman and Christopher Melby

In this brief review we examine the effects of resistance training on energy expenditure. The components of daily energy expenditure are described, and methods of measuring daily energy expenditure are discussed. Cross-sectional and exercise intervention studies are examined with respect to their effects on resting metabolic rate, physical activity energy expenditure, postexercise oxygen consumption, and substrate oxidation in younger and older individuals. Evidence is presented to suggest that although resistance training may elevate resting metabolic rate, il does not substantially enhance daily energy expenditure in free-living individuals. Several studies indicate that intense resistance exercise increases postexercise oxygen consumption and shifts substrate oxidation toward a greater reliance on fat oxidation. Preliminary evidence suggests that although resistance training increases muscular strength and endurance, its effects on energy balance and regulation of body weight appear to be primarily mediated by its effects on body composition (e.g., increasing fat-free mass) rather than by the direct energy costs of the resistance exercise.

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Robert G. McMurray and Peter A. Hosick

The study evaluated the interactions of puberty and obesity on substrate oxidation of overweight girls (n = 38) and boys (N = 35; BMI > 85th percentile) matched for gender, age, and puberty (pre/pubertal) with normal weight girls and boys. Metabolic rates (VO2) were obtained during rest and at 4, 5.6 and 8 k/h. Carbohydrate oxidation rates (mg/kgFFM/min) adjusted for % predicted VO2max, were higher for prepubertal OW children than pubertal children (p < .03). Fat oxidation rates were higher for NW prepubertal boys compared with other boys. Results indicate that OW children, regardless of gender or pubertal status, increase their carbohydrate oxidation rate to compensate for higher than normal metabolic rates. The effects of obesity on the substrate use is marginally related to puberty.

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Glen E. Duncan and Edward T. Howley

This review addresses issues related to substrate metabolism in children and how this information compares and contrasts to that of adults. The relative percent of fat and carbohydrate (CHO) utilized by an individual can be estimated from respiratory exchange ratio (RER) values between 0.7 (100% fat, 0% CHO) and 1.0 (100% CHO, 0% fat). The rise in RER towards 1.0 in relation to increased exercise intensity demonstrates the augmented role of CHO as an energy source for muscle; however, fat oxidation also represents a major source of energy during exercise of moderate-to-heavy intensity. Preliminary reports suggest that children demonstrate patterns of fat and CHO use in response to exercise intensity similar to those of adults and also show a reduction in RER at submaximal exercise intensities after training. The use of the “crossover concept" may simplify the presentation of how metabolism is affected by exercise intensity and training.

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Christopher L. Melby, Kristen L. Osterberg, Alyssa Resch, Brenda Davy, Susan Johnson and Kevin Davy

Thirteen physically active, eumenorrheic, normal-weight (BMI ≤ 25 kg/m2) females, aged 18–30 years, completed 4 experimental conditions, with the order based on a Latin Square Design: (a) CHO/Ex: moderate-intensity exer-· cise (65% V̇O2peak) with a net energy cost of ~500 kcals, during which time the subject consumed a carbohydrate beverage (45 g CHO) at specific time intervals; (b) CHO/NoEx: a period of time identical to (a) but with subjects consuming the carbohydrate while sitting quietly rather than exercising; (c) NoCHO/ Ex: same exercise protocol as condition (a) during which time subjects consumed a non-caloric placebo beverage; and (d) NoCHO/NoEx: same as the no-exercise condition (b) but with subjects consuming a non-caloric placebo beverage. Energy expenditure, and fat and carbohydrate oxidation rates for the entire exercise/sitting period plus a 90-min recovery period were determined by continuous indirect calorimetry. Following recovery, subjects ate ad libitum amounts of food from a buffet and were asked to record dietary intake during the remainder of the day. Total fat oxidation (exercise plus recovery) was attenuated by carbohydrate compared to placebo ingestion by only ~4.5 g. There was a trend (p = .08) for a carbohydrate effect on buffet energy intake such that the CHO/Ex and CHO/NoEx energy intakes were lower than the NoCHO/Ex and NoCHO/NoEx energy intakes, respectively (mean for CHO conditions: 683 kcal; NoCHO conditions: 777 kcal). Average total energy intake (buffet plus remainder of the day) was significantly lower (p < .05) following the conditions when carbohydrate was consumed (CHO/Ex = 1470 kcal; CHO/NoEx = 1285 kcal) compared to the noncaloric placebo (NoCHO/Ex =1767 kcal; NoCHO/ NoEx = 1660 kcal). In conclusion, in young women engaging in regular exercise, ingestion of 45 g of carbohydrate during exercise only modestly suppresses total fat oxidation during exercise. Furthermore, the ingestion of carbohydrate with or without exercise resulted in a lower energy intake for the remainder of the day

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Jane A. Rutherford, Lawrence L. Spriet and Trent Stellingwerff

This study examined whether acute taurine (T) ingestion before prolonged cycling would improve time-trial (TT) performance and alter whole-body fuel utilization compared with a control (CON) trial and a placebo (PL) trial in which participants were told they received taurine but did not. Eleven endurance-trained male cyclists (27.2 ± 1.5 yr, 74.3 ± 2.3 kg, 59.9 ± 2.3 ml · kg−1 · min−1; M ± SEM) completed 3 trials in a randomized, crossover, blinded design in which they consumed a noncaloric sweetened beverage with either 1.66 g of T or nothing added (CON, PL) 1 hr before exercise. Participants then cycled at 66.5% ± 1.9% VO2max for 90 min followed immediately by a TT (doing 5 kJ of work/kg body mass as fast as possible). Data on fluid administration, expired gas, heart rate, and ratings of perceived exertion were collected at 15-min intervals during the 90-min cycling ride, but there were no differences recorded between trials. There was no difference in TT performance between any of the 3 trials (1,500 ± 87 s). Average carbohydrate (T 2.73 ± 0.21, CON 2.88 ± 0.19, PL 2.89 ± 0.20 g/min) and fat (T 0.45 ± 0.05, CON 0.39 ± 0.04, PL 0.39 ± 0.05 g/min) oxidation rates were unaffected by T supplementation. T ingestion resulted in a 16% increase (5 g, ~84 kJ; p < .05) in total fat oxidation over the 90-min exercise period compared with CON and PL. The acute ingestion of 1.66 g of T before exercise did not enhance TT performance but did result in a small but significant increase in fat oxidation during submaximal cycling in endurance-trained cyclists.

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Jonathan P. Little, Philip D. Chilibeck, Dawn Ciona, Albert Vandenberg and Gordon A. Zello

The glycemic index (GI) of a pre exercise meal may affect substrate utilization and performance during continuous exercise.

Purpose:

To examine the effects of low- and high-GI foods on metabolism and performance during high-intensity, intermittent exercise.

Methods:

Seven male athletes participated in three experimental trials (low-GI, high-GI, and fasted control) separated by ~7 days. Foods were consumed 3 h before (~1.3 g·kg−1 carbohydrate) and halfway through (~0.2 g·kg−1 carbohydrate) 90 min of intermittent treadmill running designed to simulate the activity pattern of soccer. Expired gas was collected during exercise to estimate substrate oxidation. Performance was assessed by the distance covered on fve 1-min sprints during the last 15 min of exercise.

Results:

Respiratory exchange ratio was higher and fat oxidation lower during exercise in the high-GI condition compared with fasting (P < .05). The mean difference in total distance covered on the repeated sprint test between low GI and fasting (247 m; 90% confidence limits ±352 m) represented an 81% (likely, probable) chance that the low-GI condition improved performance over fasting. The mean difference between high GI and fasted control (223 m; ±385 m) represented a 76% (likely, probable) chance of improved performance. There were no differences between low and high GI.

Conclusions:

When compared with fasting, both low- and high-GI foods consumed 3 h before and halfway through prolonged, high-intensity intermittent exercise improved repeated sprint performance. High-GI foods impaired fat oxidation during exercise but the GI did not appear to influence high-intensity, intermittent exercise performance.