Search Results

You are looking at 31 - 40 of 1,625 items for :

Clear All
Restricted access

Gabriel Lozano-Berges, Ángel Matute-Llorente, Alejandro Gómez-Bruton, Alejandro González-Agüero, Germán Vicente-Rodríguez and José A. Casajús

coaches due to the high economic cost. Thus, the use of a simple, practical, and accessible method such as anthropometry to estimate %BF or fat-free mass could be a useful tool for nonprofessional football teams ( Valente-dos-Santos et al., 2012 ). Anthropometry has been used to evaluate body composition

Restricted access

Marty K. Baker, Jeffrey A. Graham, Allison Smith and Zachary T. Smith

The purpose of this Coaching In paper is to share the training guidelines directed toward youth sport participants that have been created by national football federations in various countries around the world. The specific goal of the review is to examine how elements of sport-specific free play

Restricted access

Riana R. Pryor, Douglas J. Casa, Susan W. Yeargin and Zachary Y. Kerr

Key Points ▸ Schools with multiple athletic trainers implement more heat illness safety policies. ▸ Team physicians at football practices may enhance heat illness management strategies. ▸ Team physician presence may influence riskier heat illness prevention strategies. An estimated 9,200 high

Restricted access

Xiaomin Sun, Zhen-Bo Cao, Kumpei Tanisawa, Satomi Oshima and Mitsuru Higuchi

Young collegiate athletes with regular and intensive exercise regimens have presumably been considered to have a very low risk of cardiometabolic disease. However, the clustering of metabolic risk factors has been recognized in collegiate athletes, especially in judo, American football, and rugby

Restricted access

Mattias Eckerman, Kjell Svensson, Gunnar Edman and Marie Alricsson

Football players are highly exposed to injuries. According to Ekstrand et al, 1 muscle injuries represent 31% of all injuries in football, with muscles of the lower limb representing 92% of all muscle injuries. By contrast to other injuries, muscle injuries have increased during the 21st century

Restricted access

Nils Haller, Tobias Ehlert, Sebastian Schmidt, David Ochmann, Björn Sterzing, Franz Grus and Perikles Simon

Football (soccer) is characterized by frequent changes of high-intensity actions such as sprinting, running, or tackling and low-intensity actions like walking or phases of recovery. 1 Players cover an average distance of 10 to 12 km per game with around 2 to 3 km at high intensities depending on

Restricted access

Darren J. Paul, Gustavo Tomazoli and George P. Nassis

Recovery monitoring is a staple feature in the daily routine of most professional football clubs. The objective is to measure changes in fatigue/stress and recovery and, when appropriate, take action to avoid overtraining or exposure to high loads. 1 Several different tools are used either alone

Restricted access

F. Marcello Iaia, Rampinini Ermanno and Jens Bangsbo

This article reviews the major physiological and performance effects of aerobic high-intensity and speed-endurance training in football, and provides insight on implementation of individual game-related physical training. Analysis and physiological measurements have revealed that modern football is highly energetically demanding, and the ability to perform repeated high-intensity work is of importance for the players. Furthermore, the most successful teams perform more high-intensity activities during a game when in possession of the ball. Hence, footballers need a high fitness level to cope with the physical demands of the game. Studies on football players have shown that 8 to 12 wk of aerobic high-intensity running training (>85% HRmax) leads to VO2max enhancement (5% to 11%), increased running economy (3% to 7%), and lower blood lactate accumulation during submaximal exercise, as well as improvements in the yo-yo intermittent recovery (YYIR) test performance (13%). Similar adaptations are observed when performing aerobic high-intensity training with small-sided games. Speed-endurance training has a positive effect on football-specific endurance, as shown by the marked improvements in the YYIR test (22% to 28%) and the ability to perform repeated sprints (~2%). In conclusion, both aerobic and speed-endurance training can be used during the season to improve high-intensity intermittent exercise performance. The type and amount of training should be game related and specific to the technical, tactical, and physical demands imposed on each player.

Restricted access

Samuel Ryan, Thomas Kempton, Emidio Pacecca and Aaron J. Coutts

Strength profiling and assessment of muscle-strength deficits are common in professional team-sport athletes. One test typically used for Australian footballers is adductor strength assessment. 1 , 2 Research has shown that chronic groin pain is associated with a combination of altered pelvic

Restricted access

Kyle Siler

For better or worse, athletics assume a prominent role in campus life for athletes and non-athletes alike in most American colleges. American football is a violent, physically dangerous and extremely popular sport, especially on college campuses. In 2013, NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic