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Amanda Kastrinos, Rachel Damiani and Debbie Treise

in an event that extends past their country’s borders. Media coverage allows people to participate and follow their countries’ athletes, with over 219 million viewers watching coverage of the 2012 London Olympics ( International Olympic Committee, 2013 ). The Games, if only for a moment, connect

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Adele Pavlidis, Millicent Kennelly and Laura Rodriguez Castro

headlines and captions in what we are calling “traditional” and “non-traditional” media outlets. At first glance, media coverage of GC2018 seemed to reflect the intended spirit of equality, with both traditional and non-traditional media including many images of sportswomen. We found that some media outlets

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Bastian Popp, Chris Horbel and Claas Christian Germelmann

Social-media platforms have become outlets for positive sport-related interactions ( Abeza, O’Reilly, Seguin, & Nzindukiyimana, 2017a ; MacIntosh, Abeza, & Lee, 2017 ). More specifically, sport clubs have managed to acquire impressive numbers of followers on Facebook, with Real Madrid (107

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Jessica L. David, Matthew D. Powless, Jacqueline E. Hyman, DeJon M. Purnell, Jesse A. Steinfeldt and Shelbi Fisher

and emotional distress, the necessity for such a segment warrants greater examination. Twitter is a social-media platform and text-based networking site that enables users to communicate through the transmission of messages called tweets. Although content must be pared down to bite-size tidbits, this

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John Horne

The tendency in discussions of media consumption in the past decade has been to move away from political economy or the “production of consumption” perspective; it has been accompanied by a growing interest in the active audience, symbolic culture, and textual analysis. Though sport and the mass media are a popular research topic in English-language publications, the major focus has been on a narrow range of advanced capitalist economies. This article on the relationship between the mass media and sport in Japan takes issue with both these emphases and contributes to on-going debates about sport, the media, and the commodification of popular culture. First, it provides a sketch of episodes in the development of the mass media in Japan—especially the newspaper press, radio, and television—in conjunction with that of sport. The focal point is the involvement of business corporations in the development of relations between professional sport and the mass media and the underlying commercial logic that steers that development. Second, by focusing on Japanese examples, the article provides additional empirical data so that similarities and contrasts can be drawn among existing accounts of the development of mediasport in advanced capitalist countries. In particular, it is argued that much of the writing about sport and the mass media has been derived from examination of “Anglo-American” experiences. Attention to media and sport in Japan, both as an economic commodity and as a vehicle for the creation of meaningful discourse about national identity, raises questions about debates concerning sport, media, and globalization.

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David Rowe and Callum Gilmour

Contemporary media sports culture is dominated by the West, and media sport studies has tended to focus on Western contexts. The Asia Pacific region is now a more significant feature of the global media sports cultural complex, however, through the increasingly lucrative export of Western sport television rights and merchandising, the staging of megamedia sports events in the region, the conspicuous role of sport stars from the Asia Pacific in Western sport competitions, and, in some cases, even a shift in the balance of institutional and economic power from West to East. Drawing mainly on the cases of association football (soccer), cricket, and basketball, this article identifies the complex and multidirectional flows of labor, capital, images, identities, and audiences into, from, and within the Asian media sports environment. It considers whether such developments might constitute de-, re-, or even post-Westernization and proposes the necessity of closer attention to these issues in critical media sport studies.

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Jim McKay and David Rowe

In this paper the ideological relationships between the media and Australian sport are examined from a critical perspective. After outlining the contributions of political economy, structuralism, and cultural studies to the critical paradigm, we argue that the Australian media have two main ideological effects. First, they legitimate masculine hegemony, capitalist rationality, consensus, and militaristic nationalism. Second, they marginalize, trivialize, and fragment alternative ideologies of sport. We conclude by suggesting some worthwhile topics for future research and by affirming that politicizing media representations of sport is an important part of the counter-hegemonic struggle in patriarchal capitalist societies.

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Mari Kristin Sisjord and Elsa Kristiansen

The present study explores Norwegian female and male elite wrestlers’ perceptions of media coverage of wrestling and of themselves as athletes. In-depth interviews were conducted with four female and four male elite wrestlers. Data analysis revealed that the wrestlers experienced media attention as limited and gender stereotyped, with a dominant focus on hegemonic masculinity. In addition, the wrestlers perceived that media coverage distorted their sport performance by focusing on sensational aspects and scandals rather than on actual performances and results. Some of the athletes’ descriptions of representations in the sports media and commercial television illustrated that, in their perception, they were viewed more as media clowns than as serious athletes.

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Bo Li, Olan K.M. Scott, Stirling Sharpe, Qingru Xu and Michael Naraine

International sporting competitions have been a source of value and pride, ultimately serving as an expression of national identity ( Allison, 2004 ; Maguire & Tuck, 2005 ). The Olympic Games have often been the site for study to understand how the media portray patriotism ( Vincent & Hill, 2013

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Mark Norman, Katelyn Esmonde and Courtney Szto

The past 15 years have seen the acceleration of two trends of great interest in the sociology of sport: the rapid growth and adoption of digital (sport) media ( Hutchins & Rowe, 2012 ) and, since Burawoy’s ( 2004 , 2005 ) influential calls for public sociology, a growing interest in public