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Sandra C. Webber, Francine Hahn, Lisa M. Lix, Brenda J. Tittlemier, Nancy M. Salbach and Ruth Barclay

Mobility in older adults is important for maintaining independence and participation in daily activities. It is often evaluated in clinical and research environments using measures of capacity such as the 10-m walk test (10mWT; Rydwik, Bergland, Forsen, & Frandin, 2012 ) and the 6-min walk test (6

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Jennifer L. Copeland

, metabolic syndrome, obesity, and all-cause mortality in older adults ( de Rezende, Rey-Lopez, Matsudo, & do Carmo Luiz, 2014 ). More sedentary time was associated with significantly greater predicted 10-year cardiovascular disease risk in adults age 70–89 years with mobility limitations, translating to a 1

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Deborah A.M. Jehu, Nicole Paquet and Yves Lajoie

a viable proxy to improve obstacle clearance and attention demand in older adults. In an attempt to further understand the control mechanisms of dual-task obstacle accommodation following training, the present experiment first aimed to determine whether 12 weeks of balance and mobility training (BMT

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Aaron Witwer and Eric Sauers

Context:

Overhead stress from both swimming and throwing in water-polo players might lead to alterations in shoulder mobility and subsequent injury.

Objective:

To evaluate clinical measures of shoulder mobility in college water-polo players.

Design:

Repeated measures.

Setting:

University athletic training facility.

Patients:

31 Division I water-polo athletes.

Main Outcome Measures:

Measures were obtained for both the dominant and nondominant shoulders. Scapular upward rotation was measured using a digital inclinometer, posterior shoulder tightness was assessed by recording horizontal adduction with the scapula stabilized, and passive isolated glenohumeral-joint internal- and external-rotation range of motion were measured using goniometry.

Results:

No significant difference was observed between sides for scapular upward rotation (P = .68), posterior shoulder tightness (P = .25), or internal rotation (P = .41). A significant difference between sides was present for external rotation (P < .0001) and total arc of motion (P = .039).

Conclusions:

The dominant shoulders demonstrated significantly greater external rotation and a significantly greater total arc of motion than the nondominant shoulders did.

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Anthony P. Marsh, Elizabeth A. Chmelo, Jeffrey A. Katula, Shannon L. Mihalko and W. Jack Rejeski

The purpose of this study was to determine whether a walking program supplemented by tasks designed to challenge balance and mobility (WALK+) could improve physical function more than a traditional walking program (WALK) in older adults at risk for mobility disability. 31 community-dwelling older adults (M ± SD age = 76 ± 5 yr; Short Physical Performance Battery [SPPB] score = 8.4 ± 1.7) were randomized to treatment. Both interventions were 18 sessions (1 hr, 3×/wk) and progressive in intensity and duration. Physical function was assessed using the SPPB and the 400-m-walk time. A subset of participants in the WALK group who had relatively lower baseline function showed only small improvement in their SPPB scores after the intervention (0.3 ± 0.5), whereas a subset of participants in the WALK+ group with low baseline function showed substantial improvement in their SPPB scores (2.2 ± 0.7). These preliminary data underscore the potential importance of tailoring interventions for older adults based on baseline levels of physical function.

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Jason Laurendeau

, historically, and conceptually), circumscribed as being ‘out of place’” (p. 8). Of direct relevance to the current study, Norman, Hart, and Petherick ( 2019 ) note that “displacing, spatially confining, and restricting mobilities are pivotal strategies by which European settlers have dispossessed Indigenous

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Elizabeth J. Protas and Sandrine Tissier

The purpose of this study was to pilot test a function-focused exercise intervention consisting of strength and gait-speed training in elders with reduced walking speed, decreased walking endurance, and functional impairment. Twelve participants, 77.2 years old (± 7.34), whose usual gait speed was <0.85 m/s, with walking endurance of <305 m in 5 min, and who were functionally impaired participated in a moderate-intensity exercise intervention. The training occurred 3 times per week, 75 min per session, for 3 months and combined 4 weeks of gait-speed training, walking exercise, and functional strengthening. The participants demonstrated mean usual gait speeds (≥1.0 m/s), endurance (≥350 m), and functional ability (≥10 score on performance battery) that were within normal limits after 12 weeks of training. Fastest gait speed (≥1.5 m/s) and muscle strength also improved significantly. Improvements were maintained during follow-up testing after 3–6 months. In summary, a 12-week intervention for frail, mobility-disabled participants led to improvements in walking, function, and strength.

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Chevelle M.A. Davis, Tetine L. Sentell, Juliana Fernandes de Souza Barbosa, Alban Ylli, Carmen-Lucia Curcio and Catherine M. Pirkle

moderate-intensity physical exercise per week through walking. Methods Study Design The data were collected as a part of the International Mobility in Aging Study (IMIAS), a prospective cohort study of community-dwelling older adults, across five sites: Tirana (Albania), Manizales (Colombia), Natal (Brazil

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Deborah Laliberte Rudman and Michelle Durdle

This secondary analysis of data drawn from a descriptive phenomenological study explored how older adults with low vision experience and manage community mobility. Participants included 34 urban and rural older adults, age 70 years and older, who were not using low-vision-rehabilitation services. The findings convey a core element of the experience of community mobility for participants: living with a pervasive sense of fear regarding one’s body and way of being. Participants continually gauged risks associated with mobility and engaged in risk avoidance and management strategies. Community mobility was often restricted by participants because of perceived risks, leading to reduced participation in a range of physical, social, and other types of activities. Further research on environmental factors mediating community mobility and on strategies effective in maintaining mobility among seniors with low vision is essential to optimize participation, health, and service delivery.

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Minna Rasinaho, Mirja Hirvensalo, Raija Leinonen, Taru Lintunen and Taina Rantanen

The purpose of this study was to investigate what older adults with severe, moderate, or no mobility limitation consider motives for and barriers to engaging in physical exercise. Community-dwelling adults (N = 645) age 75–81 years completed a questionnaire about their motives for and barriers to physical exercise and answered interview questions on mobility limitation. Those with severely limited mobility more often reported poor health, fear and negative experiences, lack of company, and an unsuitable environment as barriers to exercise than did those with no mobility limitation. They also accentuated disease management as a motive for exercise, whereas those with no or moderate mobility limitation emphasized health promotion and positive experiences related to exercise. Information about differences in motives for and barriers to exercise among people with and without mobility limitation helps tailor support systems that support engagement in physical activity among older adults.