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Damian Farrow, Bruce Abernethy and Robin C. Jackson

Two experiments were conducted to examine whether the conclusions drawn regarding the timing of anticipatory information pick-up from temporal occlusion studies are influenced by whether (a) the viewing period is of variable or fixed duration and (b) the task is a laboratory-based one with simple responses or a natural one requiring a coupled, interceptive movement response. Skilled and novice tennis players either made pencil-and-paper predictions of service direction (Experiment 1) or attempted to hit return strokes (Experiment 2) to tennis serves while their vision was temporally occluded in either a traditional progressive mode (where more information was revealed in each subsequent occlusion condition) or a moving window mode (where the visual display was only available for a fixed duration with this window shifted to different phases of the service action). Conclusions regarding the timing of information pick-up were generally consistent across display mode and across task setting lending support to the veracity and generalisability of findings regarding perceptual expertise in existing laboratory-based progressive temporal occlusion studies.

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Ken Martel

Despite significant advances in the development and performance of United States-born hockey players since the 1970s, room for improvement remains, especially when one compares the U.S. to its top international competition, much of which succeeds at the Olympic and World Championship level with dramatically smaller pools of talent from which to assemble its elite teams. USA Hockey sought to address this performance discrepancy and fulfill the full potential of American hockey through creation and implementation of its American Development Model (ADM), a nationwide reinvention of how hockey was taught at the grassroots level. Based on long-term athlete development principles and founded on sport science and proven child development best practices, the ADM represents a revolution in athlete and coach development. This paper explores the research that helped create USA Hockey’s ADM, along with the initiative’s methodology, execution and early outcomes.

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William M. Adams, Yuri Hosokawa and Douglas J. Casa

Context:

Although body cooling has both performance and safety benefits, knowledge on optimizing cooling during specific sport competition is limited.

Objectives:

To identify when, during sport competition, it is optimal for body cooling and to identify optimal body-cooling modalities to enhance safety and maximize sport performance.

Evidence Acquisition:

A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify articles with specific context regarding body cooling, sport performance, and cooling modalities used during sport competition. A search of scientific peer-reviewed literature examining the effects of body cooling on exercise performance was done to examine the influence of body cooling on exercise performance. Subsequently, a literature search was done to identify effective cooling modalities that have been shown to improve exercise performance.

Evidence Synthesis:

The cooling modalities that are most effective in cooling the body during sport competition depend on the sport, timing of cooling, and feasibility based on the constraints of the sports rules and regulations. Factoring in the length of breaks (halftime substitutions, etc), the equipment worn during competition, and the cooling modalities that offer the greatest potential to cool must be considered in each individual sport.

Conclusions:

Scientific evidence supports using body cooling as a method of improving performance during sport competition. Developing a strategy to use cooling modalities that are scientifically evidence-based to improve performance while maximizing athlete’s safety warrants further investigation.

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Matthew Heath and David A. Westwood

We investigated whether a representation of a visual target can be stored in memory and used to support the online control of reaching movements. To distinguish between the use of a stored target representation for movement planning versus online control, we employed a novel movement environment in which participants could not fully plan their action in advance of movement initiation; that is, the spatial mapping between the movement of a computer mouse and the on-screen movement of a cursor was randomly varied from trial to trial. As such, participants were required to use online control to reach the target position. Reaches were examined in full-vision and three memory-dependent conditions (0, 2, and 5 s of delay). Absolute constant error did not accumulate between full-vision and brief delay trials (i.e., the 0-s delay), suggesting a stored representation of the visual target can be used for online control of reaching given a sufficiently brief delay interval. Longer delay trials (2 and 5 s) were less accurate and more variable than brief delay trials; however, the residual accuracy of these memory-dependent actions suggests that the motor system may have access to a stored representation of the visual target for online control processes for upwards of 5 s following target occlusion.

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Scott A. Graupensperger, Alex J. Benson and M. Blair Evans

may influence their perceptions of teammates’ behavior). To advance our understanding of the social processes that underlie athletes’ decisions to engage in risky behaviors, we used a manipulated peer-response paradigm (MPR-paradigm) to capture athletes’ susceptibility to peer influence. Theoretical

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Michael L. Naraine

-exchange paradigm, especially the notion of blockchain and decentralized networks. While Nakamoto’s ( 2008 ) advancement of BTC as a cryptocurrency is certainly novel, the underlying support mechanism known as blockchain is incredibly nuanced and has led to other decentralized movements including ride

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Anat V. Lubetzky, Daphna Harel, Helene Darmanin and Ken Perlin

information may lead to loss of balance (LOB) with changes in the environment (e.g., darkness and rapidly moving vehicles). The sensory weighting theory has been supported in multiple studies utilizing an entrainment (i.e., moving along with a stimulus) paradigm. Specifically, Jeka’s group has demonstrated

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Zachary Wahl-Alexander and Matthew D. Curtner-Smith

The classroom ecology paradigm ( Doyle, 1977 , 1979 ) is a theoretical lens that has been used to examine why some physical education teachers are more effective than others in terms of facilitating student work and the nature of work that is completed in physical education classes ( Hastie

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Tricia D. McGuire-Adams and Audrey R. Giles

research paradigm, we explore the ways in which four Anishinaabekweg runners relate their physical activity to their health and decolonization. Theoretical Framework Suzack, Huhndorf, Perreault, and Barman ( 2010 ) have argued that feminism, especially in academia, remains white-centered; therefore, they

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Zachary Wahl-Alexander and Matthew D. Curtner-Smith

The classroom ecology paradigm ( Doyle, 1979 , 1986 ) has proven to be a useful theoretical lens through which physical education teacher education (PETE) faculty can help preservice teachers (PTs) learn to teach. PETE faculty who have used this lens have either drawn from the limited amount of