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Ryan McGrath, Chantal A. Vella, Philip W. Scruggs, Mark D. Peterson, Christopher J. Williams and David R. Paul

Background: This investigation sought to determine how accelerometer wear (1) biased estimates of sedentary behavior (SB) and physical activity (PA), (2) affected misclassifications for meeting the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, and (3) impacted the results of regression models examining the association between moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and a clinically relevant health outcome. Methods: A total of 100 participants [age: 20.6 (7.9) y] wore an ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometer for 15.9 (1.6) hours per day (reference dataset) on the hip. The BOD POD was used to determine body fat percentage. A data removal technique was applied to the reference dataset to create individual datasets with wear time ranging from 15 to 10 hours per day for SB and each intensity of PA. Results: Underestimations of SB and each intensity of PA increased as accelerometer wear time decreased by up to 167.2 minutes per day. These underestimations resulted in Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans misclassification rates of up to 42.9%. The regression models for the association between MVPA and body fat percentage demonstrated changes in the estimates for each wear-time adherence level when compared to the model using the reference MVPA data. Conclusions: Increasing accelerometer wear improves daily estimates of SB and PA, thereby also improving the precision of statistical inferences that are made from accelerometer data.

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Karyn Tappe, Ellen Tarves, Jayme Oltarzewski and Deirdra Frum

Background:

Predictive modeling for physical activity behavior has included many different psychological components, including planning, motivation, personality, and self-efficacy. However, habit formation in exercise maintenance has not been well explored and lacks reliable measurement tools. The current study explores novel survey questions that examine behavioral components of exercise habit, including frequency, environmental cuing, and temporal constancy of behavior. We then relate these concepts to an established psychological measure of habit, the Self-Report Habit Inventory (SRHI).

Methods:

One hundred and seventy-four exercisers were surveyed at 2 private fitness clubs. A single questionnaire was administered that included the SRHI and the novel behavioral questions developed from habit formation concepts.

Results:

Habit formation was reported by many of the exercisers. Participants scoring higher on the SRHI also reported higher frequency of physical activity and a higher probability of environmental cuing. Exercise frequency did not correlate well with environmental cuing.

Conclusions:

Habit formation appears relevant to the physical activity patterns of many regular exercisers. However, wide variation in response styles was evident suggesting further development and exploration of the novel questionnaire is warranted. The ultimate goals are to include habit in predictive models of physical activity, and then to inform interventions to increase exercise adherence.

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Kathleen Y. Wolin, Daniel P. Heil, Sandy Askew, Charles E. Matthews and Gary G. Bennett

Background:

The International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form (IPAQ-S) has been evaluated against accelerometer-determined physical activity measures in small homogenous samples of adults in the United States. There is limited information about the validity of the IPAQ-S in diverse US samples.

Methods:

142 Blacks residing in low-income housing completed the IPAQ-S and wore an accelerometer for up to 6 days. Both 1- and 10-minute accelerometer bouts were used to define time spent in light, moderate, and vigorous physical activity.

Results:

We found fair agreement between the IPAQ-S and accelerometer-determined physical activity (r = .26 for 10-minute bout, r = .36 for 1-minute bout). Correlations were higher among men than women. When we classified participants as meeting physical activity recommendations, agreement was low (kappa = .04, 10-minute; kappa = .21, 1-minute); only 25% of individuals were classified the same by both instruments (10-minute bout).

Conclusions:

In one of the few studies to assess the validity of a self-reported physical activity measure among Blacks, we found moderate correlations with accelerometer data, though correlations were weaker for women. Correlations were smaller when IPAQ-S data were compared using a 10- versus a 1-minute bout definition. There was limited evidence for agreement between the instruments when classifying participants as meeting physical activity recommendations.

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Holiday A. Durham, Miriam C. Morey, Cheryl A. Lovelady, Rebecca J. Namenek Brouwer, Katrina M. Krause and Truls Østbye

Background:

Low physical activity (PA) during the postpartum period is associated with weight retention. While patterns of PA have been examined in normal weight women during this period, little is known about PA among overweight and obese women. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate PA and determine the proportion of women meeting recommendations for PA.

Methods:

Women (n = 491), with a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m2 were enrolled in a behavioral intervention. PA was assessed at six weeks postpartum using the Seven-Day PA Recall.

Results:

Women averaged 923 ± 100 minutes/day of sedentary/ light and 33 ± 56 minutes/day of combined moderate, hard, and very hard daily activity. Women with a BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2 reported more time in sedentary/light activities and less hours of sleep than those with a lower BMI. Only 34% met national PA guidelines; this proportion was significantly lower among blacks (OR 0.5, CI 0.3−0.9).

Conclusions:

These overweight and obese postpartum women reported a large percentage of time spent in sedentary/light activity, and a high proportion failed to meet minimal guidelines for PA. Promotion of PA in the postpartum period should focus on reducing sedentary behaviors and increasing moderate PA.

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Seung Ho Chang, Kyungun Kim, Jihyun Lee and Sukho Lee

Background: Children and youths from low-income families and certain ethnic minority groups show high levels of risk and vulnerability to physical inactivity. The aim of this review was to examine the effectiveness of interventions to increase physical activity (PA) in children and youths from low-income and ethnic minority (LIEM) families. Methods: Eight databases were systematically searched for PA interventions for LIEM children and youths. Twenty-six studies were included in the analyses. Effect sizes (ESs) were calculated using a random-effects model. The ESs were computed using Hedges g with 95% confidence interval. Results: There were small to medium effects of interventions on PA in LIEM children and youth (Q = 1499.193, df = 30, P < .05; I 2 = 97.999). Analyses on the moderator variables showed that ES for participants aged 9–12 years (ES = 0.542, P = .01); intervention length less than 13 weeks (ES = 0.561, P = .01); specialists as the intervention agent (ES = 0.680, P < .05); interventions without technology (ES = 0.363, P = .02); and interventions with a behavioral modification component (ES = 0.336, P = .03) were significantly different from zero. Conclusion: PA intervention can be an effective strategy to increase PA for LIEM children and youths.

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Kurusart Konharn, Wichai Eungpinichpong, Kluaymai Promdee, Paramaporn Sangpara, Settapong Nongharnpitak, Waradanai Malila and Jirachai Karawa

Background:

The suitability of smartphone applications (apps) currently used to track walking/running may differ depending on a person’s weight condition. This study aimed to examine the validity and reliability of apps for both normal-weight and overweight/obese young adults.

Methods:

Thirty normal-weight (aged 21.7 ± 1.0 years, BMI 21.3 ± 1.9 kg/m2) and 30 overweight/ obese young adults (aged 21.0 ± 1.4 years, BMI 28.6 ± 3.7 kg/m2) wore a smartphone and pedometer on their right hip while walking/running at 3 different intensities on treadmills. Apps was randomly assigned to each individual for measuring average velocity, step count, distance, and energy expenditure (EE), and these measurements were then analyzed.

Results:

The apps were not accurate in counting most of the measured variables and data fell significantly lower in the parameters than those measured with standard-reference instruments in both light and moderate intensity activity among the normal-weight group. Among the overweight and obese group, the apps were not accurate in detecting velocity, distance, or EE during either light or vigorous intensities. The percentages of mean difference were 30.1% to 48.9%.

Conclusion:

Apps may not have sufficient accuracy to monitor important physical parameters of human body movement. Apps need to be developed that can, in particular, respond differently based on a person’s weight status.

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Melody Oliver, Hannah Badland, Suzanne Mavoa, Mitch J. Duncan and Scott Duncan

Background:

Global positioning systems (GPS), geographic information systems (GIS), and accelerometers are powerful tools to explain activity within a built environment, yet little integration of these tools has taken place. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of combining GPS, GIS, and accelerometry to understand transport-related physical activity (TPA) in adults.

Methods:

Forty adults wore an accelerometer and portable GPS unit over 7 consecutive days and completed a demographics questionnaire and 7-day travel log. Accelerometer and GPS data were extracted for commutes to/from workplace and integrated into a GIS database. GIS maps were generated to visually explore physical activity intensity, GPS speeds and routes traveled.

Results:

GPS, accelerometer, and survey data were collected for 37 participants. Loss of GPS data was substantial due to a range of methodological issues, such as low battery life, signal drop out, and participant noncompliance. Nonetheless, greater travel distances and significantly higher speeds were observed for motorized trips when compared with TPA.

Conclusions:

Pragmatic issues of using GPS monitoring to understand TPA behaviors and methodological recommendations for future research were identified. Although methodologically challenging, the combination of GPS monitoring, accelerometry and GIS technologies holds promise for understanding TPA within the built environment.

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Arto Gråstén, Anthony Watt, Jarmo Liukkonen and Timo Jaakkola

Background:

The study examined the effects of school-based program on students’ self-reported moderate to vigorous physical activity and physical competence, and associated links to gender, grade, body mass index, and physical education assessments.

Methods:

Participants were 240 middle school students (143 intervention, 97 control) from 3 small cities in North-East Finland. The intervention group received task-involving climate support in physical education classes and additional physical activities during school days across 1 year.

Results:

The intervention group’s physical competence increased, whereas the control group’s competence remained stable across the period. However, physical activity levels were stable in both groups. The findings also showed that body mass index was negatively associated with physical competence and activity in the intervention group at the follow-up measure. Physical education assessments were positively related with only the baseline scores of physical competence in the intervention group. In contrast, the assessments had positive relationships with physical competence and activity of control group students.

Conclusions:

The present program was an effective protocol to increase student’s perceptions of physical competence. Since the quantity of school physical education including recess activities cannot be dramatically increased, positive learning experiences should be provided, and thus, support perceptions of physical competence.

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John R. Sirard, Ann Forsyth, J. Michael Oakes and Kathryn H. Schmitz

Background:

The purpose of this study was to determine 1) the test-retest reliability of adult accelerometer-measured physical activity, and 2) how data processing decisions affect physical activity levels and test-retest reliability.

Methods:

143 people wore the ActiGraph accelerometer for 2 7-day periods, 1 to 4 weeks apart. Five algorithms, varying nonwear criteria (20 vs. 60 min of 0 counts) and minimum wear requirements (6 vs. 10 hrs/day for ≥ 4 days) and a separate algorithm requiring ≥ 3 counts per min and ≥ 2 hours per day, were used to process the accelerometer data.

Results:

Processing the accelerometer data with different algorithms resulted in different levels of counts per day, sedentary, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Reliability correlations were very good to excellent (ICC = 0.70−0.90) for almost all algorithms and there were no significant differences between physical activity measures at Time 1 and Time 2.

Conclusions:

This paper presents the first assessment of test-retest reliability of the Actigraph over separate administrations in free-living subjects. The ActiGraph was highly reliable in measuring activity over a 7-day period in natural settings but data were sensitive to the algorithms used to process them.

Open access

Jeffer Eidi Sasaki, Cheryl A. Howe, Dinesh John, Amanda Hickey, Jeremy Steeves, Scott Conger, Kate Lyden, Sarah Kozey-Keadle, Sarah Burkart, Sofiya Alhassan, David Bassett Jr and Patty S. Freedson

Background:

Thirty-five percent of the activities assigned MET values in the Compendium of Energy Expenditures for Youth were obtained from direct measurement of energy expenditure (EE). The aim of this study was to provide directly measured EE for several different activities in youth.

Methods:

Resting metabolic rate (RMR) of 178 youths (80 females, 98 males) was first measured. Participants then performed structured activity bouts while wearing a portable metabolic system to directly measure EE. Steady-state oxygen consumption data were used to compute activity METstandard (activity VO2/3.5) and METmeasured (activity VO2/measured RMR) for the different activities.

Results:

Rates of EE were measured for 70 different activities and ranged from 1.9 to 12.0 METstandard and 1.5 to 10.0 METmeasured.

Conclusion:

This study provides directly measured energy cost values for 70 activities in children and adolescents. It contributes empirical data to support the expansion of the Compendium of Energy Expenditures for Youth.