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. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 51 (3), 553–570. doi: 10.1002/jaba.474 Physical Education Transition-Planning Experiences Among Deaf–Blind Adults Regardless of ability or disability, the benefits of a physically active lifestyle are well documented. Unfortunately, individuals who are deaf–blind tend

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Jane E. Clark and Bradley D. Hatfield

body and the benefit of a physically active lifestyle to health and well-being. Not surprisingly, Cathy was also the consummate teacher. The College recognized that when she was awarded the outstanding teaching award in 2000. And as a curriculum scholar, Cathy loved developing new courses. She

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ZáNean McClain, Daniel W. Tindall and E. Andrew Pitchford

. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 51 (3), 553–570. Physical Education Transition Planning Experiences Among Deafblind Adults Regardless of ability or disability, the benefits of a physically active lifestyle are well documented. Unfortunately, individuals who are deafblind tend not to participate in

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Kim Gammage, Rachel Arnold, Lori Dithurbide, Alison Ede, Karl Erickson, Blair Evans, Larkin Lamarche, Sean Locke, Eric Martin and Kathleen Wilson

aging—older adults who think poor health or a decline in health is part of the “normal” process of aging are less likely to have a physically active lifestyle than older adults who believe it is possible to maintain health and functioning with age. Ageism, the actual or perceived differing treatment of

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Geraldine Naughton, David Greene, Daniel Courteix and Adam Baxter-Jones

Bone health as an outcome of a physically active lifestyle in young populations has taken a lower priority to cardiovascular and other metabolic health parameters. Reduced density and quality in bones increase fracture risk, which becomes evident later in life through recognition of osteoporosis as

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Volker Cihlar and Sonia Lippke

) and health-related domains of quality of life ( Chodzko-Zajko et al., 2009 ; Rejeski & Mihalko, 2001 ). Physical activity is imperative throughout the lifespan, which is why it is important to understand what it is that helps older people adopt or maintain a physically active lifestyle. The motives

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Lorraine Cale and Jo Harris

), and in terms of knowledge and understanding of healthy and active lifestyles, the person would have a sound awareness of the value of participating in a physically active lifestyle (PAL) ( Whitehead, 2013 ). More specifically, and in terms of knowledge and understanding as an attribute, “acquiring

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Heidi J. Syväoja, Anna Kankaanpää, Jouni Kallio, Harto Hakonen, Janne Kulmala, Charles H. Hillman, Anu-Katriina Pesonen and Tuija H. Tammelin

physically active lifestyle with learning outcomes has also recently received considerable attention. Previous studies have suggested that excessive screen time 7 , 8 and excess adiposity 9 , 10 may predict poorer academic achievement (AA), whereas regular PA and higher aerobic fitness 11 , 12 benefit AA

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Deirdre Dlugonski, Katrina Drowatzky DuBose and Patrick Rider

– Abbreviations: C, child; MVPA, moderate to vigorous physical activity; P, parent. * P  < .05. ** P  < .01. Discussion Many young children and their parents are not engaging in enough physical activity to meet guidelines and accumulate the health benefits associated with leading a physically active lifestyle. 1

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Rosalie Coolkens, Phillip Ward, Jan Seghers and Peter Iserbyt

PA 12 , 13 and to be physically educated by an expert. 10 The promotion of a physically active lifestyle is therefore considered to be a universal goal of PE in many countries. 14 However, as PE alone is not sufficient for children to achieve MVPA guidelines, 15 the question arises as to how PE