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Khaled Trabelsi, Stephen R. Stannard, Ronald J. Maughan, Kamel Jammoussi, Khaled Zeghal and Ahmed Hakim

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a hypertrophic training program during Ramadan on body composition and selected metabolic markers in trained bodybuilders. Sixteen male recreational bodybuilders (9 Ramadan fasters and 7 nonfasters) participated in the study. All visited the laboratory 2 d before the start of Ramadan (Bef-R) and on the 29th day of Ramadan (End-R). In the morning of each session, subjects underwent anthropometric measurement, completed a dietary questionnaire, and provided fasting blood and urine samples. Body mass and body-mass index in nonfasters increased by 2.4% (p = .05 and p = .04, respectively) from Bef-R to End-R but remained unchanged in fasters over the period of the investigation. Fasters experienced an increase in the following parameters from Bef-R to End-R: urine specific gravity (1%, p = .022) and serum concentrations of urea (5%, p = .008), creatinine (5%, p = .007), uric acid (17%, p < .001), sodium (2%, p = .019), potassium (6%, p = .006), chloride (2%, p = .028), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (10%, p = .005). However, only serum creatinine and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased in nonfasters (3%, p < .001 and 14%, p = .007, respectively) during the same period. Creatinine clearance values of fasters decreased by 3% (p = .03) from Bef-R to End-R. Continuance of hypertrophic training through Ramadan had no effect on body mass and body composition of bodybuilders, but a state of dehydration and reduced renal function were apparent, perhaps because of the restricted opportunity for fluid intake imposed by the study design.

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Pamela Jane Magee, Alison M. Gallagher and Jacqueline M. McCormack

Although dehydration of ≥ 2% body weight (BW) loss significantly impairs endurance performance, dehydration remains prevalent among athletes and may be owing to a lack of knowledge in relation to fluid requirements. The aim of this study was to assess the hydration status of university/club level athletes (n = 430) from a range of sports/activities (army officer cadet training; bootcamp training; cycling; Gaelic Athletic Association camogie, football and hurling; golf; hockey; netball; rugby; running (sprinting and endurance); Shotokan karate and soccer) immediately before and after training/competition and to assess their nutritional knowledge. Urine specific gravity (USG) was measured immediately before and after exercise and BW loss during exercise was assessed. Nutritional knowledge was assessed using a validated questionnaire. 31.9% of athletes commenced exercise in a dehydrated state (USG >1.020) with 43.6% of participants dehydrated posttraining/competition. Dehydration was particularly prevalent (>40% of cohort) among karateka, female netball players, army officer cadets, and golfers. Golfers that commenced a competitive 18 hole round dehydrated took a significantly higher number of strokes to complete the round in comparison with their euhydrated counterparts (79.5 ± 2.1 vs. 75.7 ± 3.9 strokes, p = .049). Nutritional knowledge was poor among participants (median total score [IQR]; 52.9% [46.0, 59.8]), albeit athletes who were euhydrated at the start of exercise had a higher overall score in comparison with dehydrated athletes (55.2% vs. 50.6%, p = .001). Findings from the current study, therefore, have significant implications for the education of athletes in relation to their individual fluid requirements around exercise.

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Khaled Trabelsi, Kais el Abed, Stephen R. Stannard, Kamel Jammoussi, Khaled M. Zeghal and Ahmed Hakim

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of aerobic training in a fasted versus a fed state during Ramadan on body composition and metabolic parameters in physically active men. Nineteen men were allocated to 2 groups: 10 practicing aerobic training in a fasted state (FAST) and 9 training in an acutely fed state (FED) during Ramadan. All subjects visited the laboratory for a total of 4 sessions on the following occasions: 3 days before Ramadan (Bef-R), the 15th day of Ramadan; the 29th day of Ramadan (End-R), and 21 days after Ramadan. During each session, subjects underwent anthropometric measurement, completed a dietary questionnaire, and provided fasting blood and urine samples. Body weight decreased in FAST and FED by 1.9% (p < .001) and 2.6% (p = .046), respectively. Body fat percentage decreased only in FAST by 6.2% (p = .016). FAST experienced an increase in the following parameters from Bef-R to End-R: urine specific gravity (0.64%, p = .012), urea (8.7%, p < .001), creatinine (7.5%, p < .001), uric acid (12.7%, p < .001), sodium (1.9%, p = .003), chloride (2.6%, p < .001), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (27.3%, p < .001). Of these parameters, only creatinine increased (5.8%, p = .004) in FED. Creatinine clearance values of FAST decreased by 8.9% (p < .001) and by 7.6% in FED (p = .01) from Bef-R to End-R. The authors conclude that aerobic training in a fasted state lowers body weight and body fat percentage. In contrast, fed aerobic training decreases only body weight. In addition, Ramadan fasting induced change in some metabolic parameters in FAST, but these changes were absent in FED.

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J. Luke Pryor, Evan C. Johnson, Jeffery Del Favero, Andrew Monteleone, Lawrence E. Armstrong and Nancy R. Rodriguez

Postexercise protein and sodium supplementation may aid recovery and rehydration. Preserved beef provides protein and contains high quantities of sodium that may alter performance related variables in runners. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of consuming a commercial beef product postexercise on sodium and water balance. A secondary objective was to characterize effects of the supplementation protocols on hydration, blood pressure, body mass, and running economy. Eight trained males (age = 22 ± 3 y, V̇O2max = 66.4 ± 4.2 ml·kg-1·min-1) completed three identical weeks of run training (6 run·wk-1, 45 ± 6 min·run-1, 74 ± 5% HRR). After exercise, subjects consumed either, a beef nutritional supplement (beef jerky; [B]), a standard recovery drink (SRD), or SRD+B in a randomized counterbalanced design. Hydration status was assessed via urinary biomarkers and body mass. No main effects of treatment were observed for 24 hr urine volume (SRD, 1.7 ± 0.5; B, 1.8 ± 0.6; SRD+B, 1.4 ± 0.4 L·d-1), urine specific gravity (1.016 ± 0.005, 1.018 ± 0.006, 1.017 ± 0.006) or body mass (68.4 ± 8.2, 68.3 ± 7.7, 68.2 ± 8.1 kg). No main effect of treatment existed for sodium intake—loss (-713 ± 1486; -973 ± 1123; -980 ± 1220 mg·d-1). Mean arterial pressure (81.0 ± 4.6, 81.1 ± 7.3, 83.8 ± 5.4 mm Hg) and average exercise running economy (V̇O2: SRD, 47.9 ± 3.2; B, 47.2 ± 2.6; SRD+B, 46.2 ± 3.4 ml·kg-1·min-1) was not affected. Urinary sodium excretion accounted for the daily sodium intake due to the beef nutritional supplement. Findings suggest the commercial beef snack is a viable recovery supplement following endurance exercise without concern for hydration status, performance decrements, or cardiovascular consequences.

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Lindsay A. Ellis, Brandon A. Yates, Amy L. McKenzie, Colleen X. Muñoz, Douglas J. Casa and Lawrence E. Armstrong

Urine color (Ucol) as a hydration assessment tool provides practicality, ease of use, and correlates moderately to strongly with urine specific gravity (Usg) and urine osmolality (Uosm). Indicative of daily fluid turnover, along with solute and urochrome excretion in 24-hr samples, Ucol may also reflect dietary composition. Thus, the purpose of this investigation was to determine the efficacy of Ucol as a hydration status biomarker after nutritional supplementation with beetroot (880 mg), vitamin C (1000 mg), and riboflavin (200 mg). Twenty males (Mean ± SD; age, 21 ± 2 y; body mass, 82.12 ± 15.58 kg; height, 1.77 ± 0.06 m) consumed a standardized breakfast and collected all urine voids on one control day (CON) and 1 day after consuming a standardized breakfast and a randomized and double-blinded supplement (SUP) over 3 weeks. Participants replicated exercise and diet for one day before CON, and throughout CON and SUP. Ucol, Usg, Uosm, and urine volume were measured in all 24-hr samples, and Ucol and Usg were measured in all single samples. Ucol was a significant predictor of single sample Usg after all supplements (p < .05). Interestingly, 24-hr Ucol was not a significant predictor of 24-h Usg and Uosm after riboflavin supplementation (p = .20, p = .21). Further, there was a significant difference between CON and SUP 24-h Ucol only after riboflavin supplementation (p < .05). In conclusion, this investigation suggests that users of the UCC (urine color chart) should consider riboflavin supplementation when classifying hydration status and use a combination of urinary biomarkers (e.g., Usg and Ucol), both acutely and over 24 hr.

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Eric D.B. Goulet, Adrien De La Flore, Félix A. Savoie and Jonathan Gosselin

Dual; Owen Mumford, Oxford, United Kingdom) and participants emptied their bladder, provided a urine sample, were weighed and baseline urine specific gravity (PAL-10S; Atago, Bellevue, WA), osmolality (5004 micro osmette; Precision Systems, Inc., Natick, MA), color ( Armstrong et al., 1998 ), and

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Christopher Byrne and Jason K.W. Lee

Respironics, Bend, OR) systems. 26 Prerace resting TC and HR values were obtained during a 5-minute period of seated rest. Measures of prerace hydration status (including urine-specific gravity) and fluid balance were assessed as previously described. 25 Environmental conditions were measured throughout the

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Alexander S.D. Gamble, Jessica L. Bigg, Tyler F. Vermeulen, Stephanie M. Boville, Greg S. Eskedjian, Sebastian Jannas-Vela, Jamie Whitfield, Matthew S. Palmer and Lawrence L. Spriet

measure the sweat [Na + ]. After practice, players undressed quickly, dried off, and were weighed in dry shorts to determine their postpractice BM. Measurements Prepractice hydration status (urine specific gravity [USG]) was measured in the urine samples using a digital handheld “pen” refractometer (ATAGO

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Oliver R. Barley, Dale W. Chapman, Georgios Mavropalias and Chris R. Abbiss

; MPW Med. Instruments), whereas urine samples were collected and assessed for osmolality (Advanced 3250 single-sample osmometer; Advanced Instruments, Norwood, Canada) and urine specific gravity (Atago hand refractometer, model UNC-NE; Atago, Minato, Japan) (Figure  1A ). Venous blood samples were

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Mauricio Castro-Sepulveda, Jorge Cancino, Rodrigo Fernández-Verdejo, Cristian Pérez-Luco, Sebastian Jannas-Vela, Rodrigo Ramirez-Campillo, Juan Del Coso and Hermann Zbinden-Foncea

1.5%. The VO 2 max criteria were (a) plateau in VO 2 despite increase in workload, (b) respiratory exchange ratio ≥1.10, and (c) maximal heart rate expected for age (220 beats per min − age). The tests ended when two of those three criteria were met. Urine Specific Gravity Before the training