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Hiroshi Arakawa, Akinori Nagano, Dean C. Hay and Hiroaki Kanehisa

The current study aimed to investigate the effect of ankle restriction on the coordination of vertical jumping and discuss the influence of energy transfer through m. gastrocnemius on the multijoint movement. Eight participants performed two types of vertical jumps: a normal squat jump, and a squat jump with restricted ankle joint movement. Mechanical outputs were calculated using an inverse dynamics analysis. Custom-made shoes were used to restrict plantar flexion, resulting in significantly (P < .001) reduced maximum power and work at the ankle joint to below 2% and 3%, while maintaining natural range of motion at the hip and knee. Based on the comparison between the two types of jumps, we determined that the ankle restriction increased (P < .001) the power (827 ± 346 W vs. 1276 ± 326 W) and work (92 ± 34 J vs. 144 ± 36 J) at the knee joint. A large part of the enhanced output at the knee is assumed to be due to ankle restriction, which results in the nullification of energy transport via m. gastrocnemius; that is, reduced contribution of the energy transfer with ankle restriction appeared as augmentation at the knee joint.

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Jason Brandenburg, William A. Pitney, Paul E. Luebbers, Arun Veera and Alicja Czajka

Purpose:

To examine the acute effects of static stretching on countermovement vertical-jump (CMVJ) ability and monitor the time course of any stretch-induced changes.

Methods:

Once familiarized, 16 experienced jumpers completed 2 testing sessions in a randomized order. Each session consisted of a general warm-up, a pretreatment CMVJ assessment, a treatment, and multiple posttreatment CMVJ assessments. One treatment included lower-body static stretching, and the second treatment, involving no stretching, was the control. Posttreatment CMVJ measures occurred immediately, 3, 6, 12, and 24 minutes posttreatment. Stretching consisted of 3 static-stretching exercises, with each exercise repeated 3 times and each repetition held for 30 s.

Results:

Prestretch CMVJ height equaled 47.1 (± 9.7) cm. CMVJ height immediately poststretch was 45.7 (± 9.2) cm, and it remained depressed during the 24-min follow-up period. Pre-no-stretch CMVJ height was 48.4 (± 9.8) cm, whereas immediately post-no-stretch CMVJ height equaled 46.8 (± 9.5) cm, and as in the stretch treatment, post-no-stretch CMVJ height remained lower than pre-no-stretch values. Although there was a significant main effect of time (P = .005), indicating that CMVJ was lower and remained impaired after both treatments, no significant interaction effect (P = .749) was observed.

Conclusion:

In comparison with the no-activity control, static stretching resulted in similar reductions in CMVJ ability when examined over the same time course, so athletes preparing for CMVJ should avoid periods of inactivity, as well as static stretching.

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Pablo Floria, Luis A. Gómez-Landero and Andrew J. Harrison

The purpose of this study was to determine if children exhibit greater variability in center of mass movement and kinetics compared with adults in vertical jumping. Countermovement jumps with arms (CMJA) and without arms (CMJ) performed by 20 female children and 20 female adults were examined using force platform. The data were analyzed using continuous methods to determine differences in variability between groups and between types of jump. Jumping variability was measured by using the average coefficient of variation of the force-, velocity-, displacement-, and rate of force development-time curves across the jump. The analysis indicated that children and adults had similar levels of variability in the CMJ but different levels in the CMJA. In the CMJA, the children had a greater coefficient of variation than adults in force- (20 ± 7% and 12 ± 6%), velocity- (41 ± 14% and 22 ± 9%), displacement- (8 ± 16% and 23 ± 11%) and rate of force development-time (103 ± 46% and 75 ± 42%) curves, as well as in force-velocity relationship (6 ± 2% and 4 ± 2%). The results of analysis suggest that the variability depends on both the level of maturation of the participants as well as the task complexity.

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Renato Rodano and Roberto Squadrone

Stability and consistency is a critical aspect in joint kinetic measurements. By applying a statistical technique, called sequential estimation procedure, the aim of this work was to determine the minimum number of trials required to obtain a stable mean for peak hip, knee, and ankle moments and powers during vertical jump. Nine competitive track and field sprinters (21.7 ± 3.5 yrs, 177.6 ± 4.3 cm, 70.8 ± 3.6 kg) performed 5 series of 5 double-legged maximum-height countermovement vertical jumps. From force platform and kinematic data, moment and power output were calculated for hip, knee, and ankle joints. The sequential estimation procedure applied to these data revealed that at least a 12-trial protocol is needed to establish a true measure for all the selected parameters. The mean number of trials for each variable was greater than 8 and less than 13. When hip moments were excluded from the analysis, a 10-trial protocol could be sufficient to reach a stable mean. In conclusion. the results of this study gave statistical evidence for the need to adopt multiple-trial protocols in order to obtain a stable mean for joint kinetic data.

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Niell G. Elvin, Alex A. Elvin and Steven P. Arnoczky

Modern electronics allow for the unobtrusive measurement of accelerations outside the laboratory using wireless sensor nodes. The ability to accurately measure joint accelerations under unrestricted conditions, and to correlate them with jump height and landing force, could provide important data to better understand joint mechanics subject to real-life conditions. This study investigates the correlation between peak vertical ground reaction forces, as measured by a force plate, and tibial axial accelerations during free vertical jumping. The jump heights calculated from force-plate data and accelerometer measurements are also compared. For six male subjects participating in this study, the average coefficient of determination between peak ground reaction force and peak tibial axial acceleration is found to be 0.81. The coefficient of determination between jump height calculated using force plate and accelerometer data is 0.88. Data show that the landing forces could be as high as 8 body weights of the jumper. The measured peak tibial accelerations ranged up to 42 g. Jump heights calculated from force plate and accelerometer sensors data differed by less than 2.5 cm. It is found that both impact accelerations and landing forces are only weakly correlated with jump height (the average coefficient of determination is 0.12). This study shows that unobtrusive accelerometers can be used to determine the ground reaction forces experienced in a jump landing. Whereas the device also permitted an accurate determination of jump height, there was no correlation between peak ground reaction force and jump height.

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Lee N. Burkett, Joana Ziuraitis and Wayne T. Phillips

The effectiveness of two specific and two non-specific warm-ups on the vertical jump test for female athletes was the focus of this research. The four warm-up procedures were: (a) weighted jumping (WT), (b) submaximal vertical jumping (SUB), (c) stretching (ST), and (d) no warm-up (NW). To control for learning and fatigue, a counter-balanced design was used to test all participants over four different days. Thus all groups were tested in a predetermined order. Participants were 15 university female athletes (age 18 to 23 years). After warming up using one of the four warm-up procedures, three vertical jumps were measured and the best score was used for analysis. A single factors repeated measure analysis of variance and LSD post hoc tests revealed that the weighted jump warm-up procedure was statistically superior (p<0.01) to all other warm-up procedures. No warm-up was statistically inferior to all other warm-ups and submaximal vertical jumping was not statistically different than stretching. It was concluded; (a) performing a warmup is better than no warm-up, and (b) utilizing a weighted resistance-jumping warm-up will produce the highest scores when performing the vertical jump test for female athletes.

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John R. Harry, Max R. Paquette, Brian K. Schilling, Leland A. Barker, C. Roger James and Janet S. Dufek

The countermovement vertical jump (CMVJ) is a useful physical performance test to evaluate athletic potential 1 – 3 due to its strong positive correlation to speed, power, agility, and strength performance. 2 – 6 Because of this strong relationship, researchers and practitioners aim to understand

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K. Katsikari, Eleni Bassa, Dimitrios Skoufas, Savvas Lazaridis, Christos Kotzamanidis and Dimitrios A. Patikas

. This countermovement was followed by a vertical jump. During the DJ, the participants stood on a box and projected slowly 1 foot forward, whereas the contralateral foot left the box without pushing upward or forward. After landing, they jumped immediately as high as possible. Training Program A 10-week

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Walter L. Jenkins, D.S. Williams, Brandon Bevil, Sara Stanley, Michael Blemker, Drue Taylor and Kevin O’Brien

Excessive hip motion has been linked to lower extremity pathology. Foot orthoses are commonly used to control motion within lower extremity joints when lower extremity pathology and dysfunction are present. Few studies have investigated the effect of foot orthoses on hip angular kinematics during functional activities. Eighteen females and 18 males performed a vertical jump with and without a prefabricated foot orthoses to determine the biomechanical effect of foot orthoses on hip kinematics when landing from a jump. Data collection included three-dimensional motion analysis of the lower extremity. Paired t tests were performed to determine if differences existed within genders with and without foot orthoses. At the hip joint, there was significantly less hip adduction motion in the foot orthoses condition as compared with the no foot orthoses condition in females (p < .05). There were no differences between foot orthoses conditions in males. Females appear to have a different proximal response to foot orthoses when landing from a forward jump than males.

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Walter L. Jenkins, Dorsey Shelton Williams, Alex Durland, Brandon Adams and Kevin O’Brien

The use of foot orthoses has been evaluated during a variety of functional activities. Twelve college-aged active females wore two types of foot orthoses and performed a vertical jump to determine the biomechanical effect of the orthoses on lower extremity transverse plane movement during landing. Data collection included three-dimensional analysis of the tibia, knee, and hip. A repeated-measures ANOVA was performed to determine the differences between no orthoses, over-the-counter, and custom-made orthoses with transverse plane motion. At the hip joint, there was significantly less internal rotation (p < .05) in the over-the-counter condition as compared with the no orthoses condition. There was significantly less tibial internal rotation (p < .05) in the custom-made condition as compared with no orthoses. Over-the-counter devices decreased transverse plane motion at the hip, whereas custom-made devices decreased transverse plane motion of the tibia.