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Allan H. Goldfarb, Stephen W. Patrick, Scott Bryer and Tongjian You

Vitamin C supplementation (VC) (either 500 or 1000 mg/d for 2 wk) was compared to a placebo treatment (P) to ascertain if VC could influence oxidative stress. Twelve healthy males (25 ± 1.4 y) were randomly assigned in a counter-balanced design with a 2-wk period between treatments. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. Exercise intensity measures (VO2, RER, RPE, HR, lactate) were similar across treatments. Resting blood oxidative-stress markers were unaffected by treatment. Exercise decreased total blood glutathione (TGSH) and reduced glutathione (GSH) and increased oxidized glutathione (GSSG) (P < 0.01) independent of treatment. Protein carbonyls (PC) increased 3.8 fold in the P (P < 0.01). VC attenuated the PC exercise response in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.01). Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) was not influenced by exercise (P = 0.68) or VC. These data suggest that VC supplementation can attenuate exercise-induced protein oxidation in a dose-dependent manner with no effect on lipid peroxidation and glutathione status.

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Joanne R. Welsman, Neil Armstrong and Brian J. Kirby

This study was designed to investigate the influence of sexual maturity on peak V̇O2 and blood lactate responses to exercise using serum testosterone levels as an objective measure of maturity. Testosterone levels were determined in venous blood samples obtained from 12- to 16-year-old males (n = 50). Peak V̇O2 and percentage of peak V̇O2 at blood lactate levels of 2.5 and 4.0 mmol·L−1 were determined during incremental treadmill running. Standard multiple regression revealed that body mass, age, and height explained 74% of the variance in peak V̇O2 scores. The addition of serum testosterone to the equation failed to produce a significant increase in the explained variance. Correlation coefficients between testosterone and the lactate variables were not significant (p > .05). These findings do not support the hypothesis that hormonal changes per se during sexual maturation play an important role in the development of peak V̇O2 and blood lactate responses to exercise.

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Anthony Barnett, Lawrence Y.S. Chan and Lain C. Bruce

The purpose of the present study was to determine the validity of the 20-meter multistage shuttle run (MSR) for predicting peak VO2 in Hong Kong Chinese students, ages 12–17 years. Fifty-five subjects, 27 boys and 28 girls, performed the MSR in the school environment and had peak VO2 determined in the laboratory. A correlation of 0.72 (p<0.001) was found between peak VO2 and predicted peak VO2 using an equation previously developed with Canadian children (6). However, maximal shuttle run speed alone was a better predictor in this group (r=0.74, SEE=4.6 ml · kg−1·min−1, p<.001). Multiple-regression analysis (best-subsets) was performed and the best predictor variables were maximal speed and sex with either triceps skinfold or weight. For practical application in the school setting, the equation peak VO2 = 24.2 − 5.0(sex) − 0.8(age) + 3.4(maximal speed) (r=0.82, SEE=4.0), where for sex, male = 0 and female = 1, is suggested.

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Renato A.C. Caritá, Camila C. Greco and Benedito S. Denadai

Prior high-intensity exercise can improve exercise performance during severe-intensity exercise. These positive alterations have been attributed, at least in part, to enhancement of overall oxygen-uptake (VO2) kinetics.

Purpose:

To determine the effects of prior heavy-intensity exercise on VO2 kinetics and short-term high-intensity exercise performance in individuals with different aerobic-training statuses.

Methods:

Fifteen active subjects (UT; VO2max = 43.8 ± 6.3 mL · kg−1 · min−1) and 10 well-trained endurance cyclists (T; VO2max = 66.7 ± 6.7 mL · kg−1 · min−1) performed the following protocols: an incremental test to determine lactate threshold and VO2max, 4 maximal constant-load tests to estimate critical power, and two 3-min bouts of cycle exercise, involving 2 min of constant-work-rate exercise at severe intensity followed by a 1-min all-out sprint test. This trial was performed without prior intervention and 10 min after prior heavy-intensity exercise (ie, 6 min at 90% critical power).

Results:

The mean response time of VO2 was shortened after prior exercise for both UT (30.7 ± 9.2 vs 24.1 ± 7.2 s) and T (31.8 ± 5.2 vs 25.4 ± 4.3 s), but no group-by-condition interaction was detected. The end-sprint performance (ie, mean power output) was improved in both groups (UT ~4.7%, T ~2.0%; P < .05) by prior exercise.

Conclusion:

The effect of prior heavy-intensity exercise on overall VO2 kinetics and short-term high-intensity exercise performance is independent of aerobic-training status.

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Peter Peeling, Tanya Blee, Carmel Goodman, Brian Dawson, Gary Claydon, John Beilby and Alex Prins

This investigation examined the effect of intramuscular iron injections on aerobic-exercise performance in iron-deficient women. Sixteen athletes performed a 10-min steady-state sub maximal economy test, a VO2max test, and a timed test to exhaustion at VO2max workload. Subjects were randomly assigned to an iron-supplemented group (IG) receiving intramuscular iron injections or to a placebo group (PG). Twenty days after the first injection, exercise and blood testing were repeated. A final blood test occurred on Day 28. Post supplementation, no differences were found between the groups’ sub maximal or maximal VO2, heart rate, or blood lactate (P > 0.05). Time to exhaustion was increased in the IG (P < 0.05) but was not greater than that of the PG (P > 0.05). The IG’s serum ferritin (SF) was significantly increased on Days 20 and 28 (mean ± standard error: 19 ± 3 to 65 ± 11 to 57 ± 12 µg/L; P < 0.01), with a percentage change from baseline significantly greater than in the PG (P < 0.01). It was concluded that intramuscular iron injections can effectively increase SF without enhancing sub maximal or maximal aerobic-exercise performance in iron-depleted female athletes.

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Naomi M. Cermak, Martin J. Gibala and Luc J.C. van Loon

Six days of dietary nitrate supplementation in the form of beetroot juice (~0.5 L/d) has been reported to reduce pulmonary oxygen uptake (VO2) during submaximal exercise and increase tolerance of high-intensity work rates, suggesting that nitrate can be a potent ergogenic aid. Limited data are available regarding the effect of nitrate ingestion on athletic performance, and no study has investigated the potential ergogenic effects of a small-volume, concentrated dose of beetroot juice. The authors tested the hypothesis that 6 d of nitrate ingestion would improve time-trial performance in trained cyclists. Using a double-blind, repeated-measures crossover design, 12 male cyclists (31 ± 3 yr, VO2peak = 58 ± 2 ml · kg−1 · min−1, maximal power [Wmax] = 342 ± 10 W) ingested 140 ml/d of concentrated beetroot (~8 mmol/d nitrate) juice (BEET) or a placebo (nitrate-depleted beetroot juice; PLAC) for 6 d, separated by a 14-d washout. After supplementation on Day 6, subjects performed 60 min of submaximal cycling (2 × 30 min at 45% and 65% Wmax, respectively), followed by a 10-km time trial. Time-trial performance (953 ± 18 vs. 965 ± 18 s, p < .005) and power output (294 ± 12 vs. 288 ± 12 W, p < .05) improved after BEET compared with PLAC supplementation. Submaximal VO2 was lower after BEET (45% Wmax = 1.92 ± 0.06 vs. 2.02 ± 0.09 L/min, 65% Wmax 2.94 ± 0.12 vs. 3.11 ± 0.12 L/min) than with PLAC (main effect, p < .05). Wholebody fuel selection and plasma lactate, glucose, and insulin concentrations did not differ between treatments. Six days of nitrate supplementation reduced VO2 during submaximal exercise and improved time-trial performance in trained cyclists.

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Christian Lorenzen, Morgan D. Williams, Paul S. Turk, Daniel L. Meehan and Daniel J. Cicioni Kolsky

Purpose:

Running velocity reached at maximal oxygen uptake (vVO2max) can be a useful measure to prescribe training intensity for aerobic conditioning. Obtaining it in the laboratory is often not practical, and average velocities from time trials are an attractive alternative. To date, the efficacies of such practices for team sport players are unknown. This study aimed to assess the relationship between vVO2max obtained in the laboratory against two time-trial estimates (1500 m and 3200 m).

Methods:

During the early preseason, elite Australian Rules football players (n = 23, 22.7 ± 3.4 y, 187.7 ± 8.2 cm, 75.5 ± 9.2 kg) participated in a laboratory test on a motorized treadmill and two outdoor time trials.

Results:

Based on average velocity the 1500-m time-trial performance (5.01 ± 0.23 m·s−1) overestimated (0.36 m·s−1, d = 1.75), whereas the 3200-m time trial (4.47 ± 0.23 m·s−1) underestimated (0.17 m·s−1, d = 0.83) the laboratory vVO2max (4.64 ± 0.18 m·s−1). Despite these differences, both 1500-m and 3200-m time-trial performances correlated with the laboratory measure (r = -0.791; r = -0.793 respectively). Both subsequent linear regressions were of good ft and predicted the laboratory measure within ± 0.12 m·s−1.

Conclusion:

Estimates of vVO2max should not be used interchangeably, nor should they replace the laboratory measure. When laboratory testing is not accessible for team sports players, prescription of training intensity may be more accurately estimated from linear regression based on either 1500-m or 3200-m time-trial performance than from the corresponding average velocity.

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Bent R. Rønnestad, Tue Rømer and Joar Hansen

Performance in cross-country (XC) skiing is highly related to maximal oxygen consumption (VO 2 max). 1 , 2 The high VO 2 max values in XC skiers could be related to numerous factors such as genetics, training volume, training periodization, and amount of high-intensity aerobic interval training

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Greg Doncaster, John Iga and Viswanath Unnithan

maturation with respect to detailed measures of cardiorespiratory fitness in highly trained youth soccer players. Moreover, recent research has highlighted the importance of appropriate scaling to successfully accommodate the nonlinear relationship between body size descriptors and peak oxygen uptake (VO 2

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Francisco J. Amaro-Gahete, Lucas Jurado-Fasoli, Alejandro R. Triviño, Guillermo Sanchez-Delgado, Alejandro De-la-O, Jørn W. Helge and Jonatan R. Ruiz

protocol is considered an important factor in endurance exercise performance as well and in cardiovascular health. 5 Moreover, another important variable is the exercise intensity at which MFO occurs, so called Fat max . Both MFO and Fat max , together with maximum oxygen uptake (VO 2 max), VO 2 max