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Lisa Kakinami, Erin K. O’Loughlin, Erika N. Dugas, Catherine M. Sabiston, Gilles Paradis and Jennifer O’Loughlin

Background:

Compared with traditional nonactive video games, exergaming contributes significantly to overall daily physical activity (PA) in experimental studies, but the association in observational studies is not clear.

Methods:

Data were available in the 2011 to 2012 wave of the Nicotine Dependence in Teens (NDIT) study (N = 829). Multivariable sex-stratified models assessed the association between exergaming (1–3 times per month in the past year) and minutes of moderate and vigorous physical activity in the previous week, and the association between exergaming and meeting PA recommendations.

Results:

Compared with male exergamers, female exergamers were more likely to believe exergames were a good way to integrate PA into their lives (89% vs 62%, P = .0001). After we adjusted for covariates, male exergamers were not significantly different from male nonexergamers in minutes of PA. Female exergamers reported 47 more minutes of moderate PA in the previous week compared with female nonexergamers (P = .03). There was no association between exergaming and meeting PA recommendations.

Conclusion:

Exergaming contributes to moderate minutes of PA among women but not among men. Differences in attitudes toward exergaming should be further explored.

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Diane M. DellaValle and Jere D. Haas

The objective of this study was to determine the impact of iron depletion without anemia on performance in a sample of female collegiate rowers at the beginning of a training season (August 2008, January 2009, and September 2009). One hundred sixty-five female collegiate rowers from 5 colleges and universities in central New York State participated in a screening of iron status. Blood hemoglobin (Hgb), serum ferritin (sFer), and soluble transferrin receptor were measured to determine prevalence of iron depletion and anemia. Rowers’ habitual moderate and vigorous physical activity, as well as their best time to complete a 2-km simulated race during the previous 3 months, were self-reported. Sixteen rowers (10%) were identified as anemic (Hgb <12.0 g/dl). Using a sFer cutoff of <20.0 μg/L, 30% (n = 44) of the nonanemic rowers were identified as iron depleted without anemia and reported 2-km times ~21 s slower (p < .004) than rowers with normal iron status. Given the high prevalence of iron depletion reported in this and other studies, screening for low iron stores at the start of a training program in female athletes involved in an endurance sport may be clinically useful. In this study, irondepleted rowers (sFer <20–25 μg/L) reported a decrease in performance time compared with those with normal iron stores.

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Alexis C. Frazier-Wood, Ingrid B. Borecki, Mary F. Feitosa, Paul N. Hopkins, Caren E. Smith and Donna K. Arnett

Background:

Time spent in sedentary activities (such as watching television) has previously been associated with several risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) such as increased low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Little is known about associations with lipoprotein subfractions. Using television and computer screen time in hours per day as a measure of sedentary time, we examined the association of screen time with lipoprotein subfractions.

Methods:

Data were used from men and women forming the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network (GOLDN) study population. Mixed linear models specified lipoprotein measures as the outcome, and screen time as the predictor for fourteen lipoprotein subfraction measures, and included age, smoking status, pedigree, and fat, carbohydrate daily alcohol and energy intake as covariates. Analyses were run separately for men (n = 623) and women (n = 671). A step-down Bonferroni correction was applied to results. The analysis was repeated for significant results (p < .05), additionally controlling for body mass index (BMI) and moderate and vigorous physical activity.

Results:

Linear models indicated that screen time was associated with five lipoprotein parameters in women: the concentration of large VLDL particles (p = .01), LDL particle number (p = .01), concentration of small LDL particles (p = .04), the concentration of large HDL particles (p = .04), and HDL diameter (p = .02). All associations remained after controlling for moderate or vigorous physical activity and BMI.

Conclusions:

We show that sedentary time is associated with lipoprotein measures, markers of cardiometabolic disease, independently of physical activity and BMI, in women but not men.

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Kyle M. Petit and Tracey Covassin

Context: Cognitive and physical rest are commonly utilized when managing a sport-related concussion (SRC); however, emerging research now suggests that excessive rest may negatively impact recovery. Despite current research recommendations, athletic trainers (ATs) may be behind in implementing this emerging research into clinical practice. Objective: To assess college ATs’ perceptions and implementation of an emerging SRC management approach (cognitive and physical rest and activity). Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Survey. Participants: A total of 122 (11.8%) ATs (53.3% female; 10.8 [9.8] y experience; 8.7 [6.9] SRCs managed annually) responded to the survey, which was randomly distributed to 1000 members of the National Athletic Trainers’ Association, as well as 31 additional ATs from varying universities. Main Outcome Measures: A 5-point Likert scale assessed the ATs’ perceptions and clinical practices as they relate to specific athlete behaviors (ie, texting, sleeping). The ATs were asked about their willingness to incorporate physical activity into clinical practice. Results: Playing video games (95.9%) and practicing (93.4%) were the activities most perceived to extend SRC recovery. However, sleeping more than usual (7.4%) and increased time in a dark environment (11.5%) were viewed as less likely to extend recovery. ATs restricted practicing (98.4%) and working out (91.8%) for athletes with SRC, while sleeping more than usual (6.6%) and increased time in a dark environment (13.1%) were less restricted. About 71% of the ATs would implement light physical activity for athletes with a symptom score of 1 to 5, 31% with scores of 6 to 10, and 15% with scores of 11 to 20. About 43%, 74%, and 97% believe that light, moderate, and vigorous physical activity, while symptomatic, will extend recovery, respectively. Conclusions: The ATs were receptive to including light physical activity into their SRC management, although only in certain situations. However, most ATs’ beliefs and clinical practices did not completely align with emerging research recommendations for the management of SRCs.

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.1123/jsep.31.6.685 Research Affect, Exercise, and Physical Activity among Healthy Adolescents Margaret Schneider * Andrea Dunn * Daniel Cooper * 12 2009 31 6 706 723 10.1123/jsep.31.6.706 Conscientiousness, Extroversion, and Action Control: Comparing Moderate and Vigorous Physical Activity Gert

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and Vigorous Physical Activity and Gross Motor Coordination in Preschool Children Sandra Silva-Santos * Amanda Santos * Michael Duncan * Susana Vale * Jorge Mota * 1 08 2019 7 2 273 285 10.1123/jmld.2017-0056 jmld.2017-0056 JMLD Journal of Motor Learning and Development 2325-3193 2325-3215 1

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* Pamela Kulinna * Han van der Mars * 10 2016 35 4 337 348 10.1123/jtpe.2016-0112 Gender and School-Level Differences in Students’ Moderate and Vigorous Physical Activity Levels When Taught Basketball Through the Tactical Games Model Stephen Harvey * Megan L. Smith * Yang Song * David Robertson

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, including subsamples of children with DCD ( n  = 111), at-risk for DCD ( n  = 177), and typically developing ( n  = 301). All children were measured according to the multiple components of HRF (i.e., body composition, musculoskeletal fitness, aerobic fitness, flexibility) and vigorous physical activity via

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ZáNean McClain, Daniel W. Tindall and E. Andrew Pitchford

children including subsamples of children with DCD ( n  = 111), at-risk for DCD ( n  = 177), and typically developing ( n  = 301). All children were measured in multiple components of HRF (i.e., body composition, musculoskeletal fitness, aerobic fitness, flexibility) and vigorous physical activity using an

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Goodman * W. Douglas Evans * Loretta DiPietro * 1 2012 9 9 1 1 124 124 128 128 10.1123/jpah.9.1.124 Correlates of Children’s Moderate and Vigorous Physical Activity During Weekdays and Weekends Stuart J. Fairclough * Nicola D. Ridgers * Gregory Welk * 1 2012 9 9 1 1 129 129 137 137 10.1123/jpah