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Bradley M. Appelhans and Hong Li

Purpose:

This study tested associations of organized sports participation and unstructured active play with overall moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in low-income children and examined factors associated with participation frequency.

Method:

Research staff visited 88 low-income Chicago households with children ages 6–13 years. MVPA was assessed through 7-day accelerometry. Researchers documented the home availability of physical activity equipment. Caregivers reported on child participation in organized sports and unstructured active play, family support for physical activity, perceived neighborhood safety, and access to neighborhood physical activity venues.

Results:

Despite similar participation in organized sports and unstructured active play, boys accumulated more MVPA than girls. MVPA was predicted by an interaction between gender and unstructured active play. Boys accumulated 23–45 additional minutes of weekday MVPA and 53–62 additional minutes of weekend MVPA through unstructured active play, with no such associations in girls. Higher reported neighborhood safety and family support for physical activity were associated with engagement in unstructured active play for both genders, and with participation in organized sports for girls.

Conclusion:

Physical activity interventions for low-income, urban children should emphasize unstructured active play, particularly in boys. Fostering family support for physical activity and safe play environments may be critical intervention components.

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Gavin R. McCormack, John C. Spence, Tanya Berry and Patricia K. Doyle-Baker

Background:

Research regarding the pathways via which the environment influences physical activity is limited. This study examined the role of perceived behavioral control (PBC) in mediating the relationship between perceptions of neighborhood walkability and frequency of moderate (MODPA) and vigorous physical activity (VIGPA).

Methods:

Data were collected through a province-wide survey of physical activity. Telephone-interviews were conducted with 1207 adults and captured information about perceptions of neighborhood walkability, physical activity, PBC and demographics. Gender-stratified regression analyses were conducted to test PBC mediation of the built environment-physical activity association.

Results:

Among women easy access to places for physical activity was positively associated with MODPA and VIGPA. Having many shops and places within walking distance of homes was also positively associated with MODPA among women however; reporting sidewalks on most neighborhood streets, and crime rate in the neighborhood were negatively correlated with MODPA. Among men, easy access to places for physical activity was positively associated and crime rate in the neighborhood negatively associated, with VIGPA. After adjusting for PBC, the association between easy access to places for physical activity and VIGPA and MODPA attenuated for men and women suggesting mediation of this association by PBC.

Conclusions:

PBC mediated the relationship between easy access to places for physical activity and physical activity, but not for other perceived environmental attributes.

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Kyle M. Petit and Tracey Covassin

Context: Cognitive and physical rest are commonly utilized when managing a sport-related concussion (SRC); however, emerging research now suggests that excessive rest may negatively impact recovery. Despite current research recommendations, athletic trainers (ATs) may be behind in implementing this emerging research into clinical practice. Objective: To assess college ATs’ perceptions and implementation of an emerging SRC management approach (cognitive and physical rest and activity). Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Survey. Participants: A total of 122 (11.8%) ATs (53.3% female; 10.8 [9.8] y experience; 8.7 [6.9] SRCs managed annually) responded to the survey, which was randomly distributed to 1000 members of the National Athletic Trainers’ Association, as well as 31 additional ATs from varying universities. Main Outcome Measures: A 5-point Likert scale assessed the ATs’ perceptions and clinical practices as they relate to specific athlete behaviors (ie, texting, sleeping). The ATs were asked about their willingness to incorporate physical activity into clinical practice. Results: Playing video games (95.9%) and practicing (93.4%) were the activities most perceived to extend SRC recovery. However, sleeping more than usual (7.4%) and increased time in a dark environment (11.5%) were viewed as less likely to extend recovery. ATs restricted practicing (98.4%) and working out (91.8%) for athletes with SRC, while sleeping more than usual (6.6%) and increased time in a dark environment (13.1%) were less restricted. About 71% of the ATs would implement light physical activity for athletes with a symptom score of 1 to 5, 31% with scores of 6 to 10, and 15% with scores of 11 to 20. About 43%, 74%, and 97% believe that light, moderate, and vigorous physical activity, while symptomatic, will extend recovery, respectively. Conclusions: The ATs were receptive to including light physical activity into their SRC management, although only in certain situations. However, most ATs’ beliefs and clinical practices did not completely align with emerging research recommendations for the management of SRCs.

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and Vigorous Physical Activity and Gross Motor Coordination in Preschool Children Sandra Silva-Santos * Amanda Santos * Michael Duncan * Susana Vale * Jorge Mota * 1 08 2019 7 2 273 285 10.1123/jmld.2017-0056 jmld.2017-0056 JMLD Journal of Motor Learning and Development 2325-3193 2325-3215 1

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.1123/jsep.31.6.685 Research Affect, Exercise, and Physical Activity among Healthy Adolescents Margaret Schneider * Andrea Dunn * Daniel Cooper * 12 2009 31 6 706 723 10.1123/jsep.31.6.706 Conscientiousness, Extroversion, and Action Control: Comparing Moderate and Vigorous Physical Activity Gert

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* Pamela Kulinna * Han van der Mars * 10 2016 35 4 337 348 10.1123/jtpe.2016-0112 Gender and School-Level Differences in Students’ Moderate and Vigorous Physical Activity Levels When Taught Basketball Through the Tactical Games Model Stephen Harvey * Megan L. Smith * Yang Song * David Robertson

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, including subsamples of children with DCD ( n  = 111), at-risk for DCD ( n  = 177), and typically developing ( n  = 301). All children were measured according to the multiple components of HRF (i.e., body composition, musculoskeletal fitness, aerobic fitness, flexibility) and vigorous physical activity via

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17 6 585 591 10.1123/jpah.2018-0711 jpah.2018-0711 Trends in Total Physical Activity Time, Walking, and Vigorous Physical Activity Time in Queensland Adults From 2004–2018 Alison Griffin * Tim Roselli * Susan L. Clemens * 08 05 2020 1 06 2020 17 6 592 602 10.1123/jpah.2019-0282 jpah.2019

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ZáNean McClain, Daniel W. Tindall and E. Andrew Pitchford

children including subsamples of children with DCD ( n  = 111), at-risk for DCD ( n  = 177), and typically developing ( n  = 301). All children were measured in multiple components of HRF (i.e., body composition, musculoskeletal fitness, aerobic fitness, flexibility) and vigorous physical activity using an

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Goodman * W. Douglas Evans * Loretta DiPietro * 1 2012 9 9 1 1 124 124 128 128 10.1123/jpah.9.1.124 Correlates of Children’s Moderate and Vigorous Physical Activity During Weekdays and Weekends Stuart J. Fairclough * Nicola D. Ridgers * Gregory Welk * 1 2012 9 9 1 1 129 129 137 137 10.1123/jpah