Search Results

You are looking at 41 - 50 of 300 items for :

  • "force platform" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Jonathan Sinclair, Sarah J. Hobbs, Laurence Protheroe, Christopher J. Edmundson and Andrew Greenhalgh

Biomechanical analysis requires the determination of specific foot contact events. This is typically achieved using force platform information; however, when force platforms are unavailable, alternative methods are necessary. A method was developed for the determination of gait events using an accelerometer mounted to the distal tibia, measuring axial accelerations. The aim of the investigation was to determine the efficacy of this method. Sixteen participants ran at 4.0 m/s ±5%. Synchronized tibial accelerations and vertical ground reaction forces were sampled at 1000 Hz as participants struck a force platform with their dominant foot. Events determined using the accelerometer, were compared with the corresponding events determined using the force platform. Mean errors of 1.68 and 5.46 ms for average and absolute errors were observed for heel strike and of –3.59 and 5.00 ms for toe-off. Mean and absolute errors of 5.18 and 11.47 ms were also found for the duration of the stance phase. Strong correlations (r = .96) were also observed between duration of stance obtained using the two different methods. The error values compare favorably to other alternative methods of predicting gait events. This suggests that shank-mounted accelerometers can be used to accurately and reliably detect gait events.

Restricted access

Jean-Benoît Morin, Georges Dalleau, Heikki Kyröläinen, Thibault Jeannin and Alain Belli

The spring-mass model, representing a runner as a point mass supported by a single linear leg spring, has been a widely used concept in studies on running and bouncing mechanics. However, the measurement of leg and vertical stiffness has previously required force platforms and high-speed kinematic measurement systems that are costly and difficult to handle in field conditions. We propose a new “sine-wave” method for measuring stiffness during running. Based on the modeling of the force-time curve by a sine function, this method allows leg and vertical stiffness to be estimated from just a few simple mechanical parameters: body mass, forward velocity, leg length, flight time, and contact time. We compared this method to force-platform-derived stiffness measurements for treadmill dynamometer and overground running conditions, at velocities ranging from 3.33 m·s–1 to maximal running velocity in both recreational and highly trained runners. Stiffness values calculated with the proposed method ranged from 0.67% to 6.93% less than the force platform method, and thus were judged to be acceptable. Furthermore, significant linear regressions (p < 0.01) close to the identity line were obtained between force platform and sine-wave model values of stiffness. Given the limits inherent in the use of the spring-mass model, it was concluded that this sine-wave method allows leg and stiffness estimates in running on the basis of a few mechanical parameters, and could be useful in further field measurements.

Restricted access

Bryan L. Riemann, Kevin M. Guskiewicz and Edgar W. Shields

Although sophisticated forceplate systems are available for postural stability analyses, their use is limited in many sports medicine settings because of budgetary constraints. The purpose of this investigation was to compare a clinical method of evaluating postural stability with a force-platform sway measure. Participants completed a battery of three stance variations (double, single, and tandem) on two different surfaces (firm and foam) while standing on a force platform. This arrangement allowed for simultaneous comparisons between forceplate sway measures and clinical assessments using the Balance Error Scoring System (BESS). Significant correlations were revealed for the single-leg and tandem stances on the firm surface and for double, single, and tandem stances on the foam surface. These results suggest that the BESS is a reliable method of assessing postural stability in the absence of computerized balance systems.

Restricted access

Rita Santos-Rocha and António Veloso

Mechanical load has been estimated during step exercise based on ground reaction force (GRF) obtained by force platforms. It is not yet accurately known whether these measures reflect foot contact forces once the latter depend on footwear and are potentially modified by the compliant properties of the step bench. The aim of the study was to compare maximal and mean plantar pressure (PP), and maximal GRF obtained by pressure insoles after performing seven movements both over two metal force platforms and over the step bench. Fifteen step-experienced females performed the movements at the cadences of 130 and 140 beats per minute. PP and GRF (estimated from PP) obtained for each floor condition were compared. Maximal PP ranged from 29.27 ± 9.94 to 47.07 ± 12.88 N/cm2 as for metal platforms, and from 28.20 ± 9.32 to 43.00 ± 13.80 N/cm2 as for the step bench. Mean PP ranged from 11.09 ± 1.62 to 14.32 ± 2.06 N/cm2 (platforms) and from 10.71 ± 1.54 to 14.22 ± 1.77 N/cm2 (step bench). GRF (normalized body weight) ranged from 1.43 ± 0.14 to 2.41 ± 0.24 BW (platforms) and from 1.38 ± 0.14 to 2.36 ± 0.19 BW (step bench). No significant statistical differences were obtained for most of the comparisons between the two conditions tested. The results suggest that metal force platform surfaces are suitable to assess mechanical load during this physical activity. The forces applied to the foot are similar to the softer step bench and the hard force platform surface. This may reflect the ability of the performers to adapt their movement patterns to normalize the impact forces in different floor conditions.

Restricted access

Alberto Ranavolo, Romildo Don, Angelo Cacchio, Mariano Serrao, Marco Paoloni, Massimiliano Mangone and Valter Santilli

Kinematic and kinetic methods (sacral marker, reconstructed pelvis, segmental analysis, and force platform methods) have been used to calculate the vertical excursion of the center of mass (COM) during movement. In this study we compared the measurement of vertical COM displacement yielded by different methods during able-bodied subjects’ hopping at different frequencies (varying between 1.2 and 3.2 Hz). ANOVA revealed a significant interaction between hopping frequency and method (p < 0.001), showing that increasing hopping frequency reduced the differences between methods. A post hoc analysis revealed a significant difference between all methods at the lowest hopping frequency and between the force platform and both the sacral marker and reconstructed pelvis methods at the intermediate hopping frequencies, with differences ranging from 16 to 67 millimeters (all p < 0.05). Results are discussed in view of each methods’ limits. We conclude that the segmental analysis and force platform methods can be considered to provide the most accurate results for COM vertical excursion during human hopping in a large range of hopping frequency.

Restricted access

Mohan Ganesan, Yun-Ju Lee and Alexander S. Aruin

The use of a footrest while performing activity in standing is frequently associated with improvement of a user’s well-being however no information exists on the role of a footrest in improving postural stability. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of using a footrest in postural control. Twenty healthy young volunteers were tested using three experimental conditions: standing with two feet on the force platform and standing on the force platform when one foot was placed on a 15 cm footrest positioned in front or laterally. The mean and root mean square distance, range and velocity of the center of pressure (COP) were calculated in the anterior-posterior (AP) and medio-lateral (ML) directions using the force platform data. The COP displacements in AP and ML directions increased in conditions of standing with one foot placed on the footrest regardless of its location. Standing with eyes closed increased COP displacements further. The outcome of the study suggests the importance of using COP measures for evaluation of postural stability and provides additional information needed for optimization of working conditions involving standing with a footrest.

Restricted access

Stephen D. Murphy and D. Gordon E. Robertson

To remove low-frequency noise from data such as DC-bias from electromyo-grams (EMGs) or drift from force transducers, a high-pass filter was constructed from a low-pass filter of known characteristics. A summary of the necessary steps required to transform the low-pass digital were developed. Contaminated EMG and force platform data were used to test the filter. The high-pass filter successfully removed the low-frequency noise from the EMG signals. The high-pass filter was then cascaded with the low-pass filter to produce a band-pass filter to enable simultaneous high- and low-frequency noise reduction.

Restricted access

Abderrehmane Rahmani, Georges Dalleau, Fabrice Viale, Christophe A. Hautier and Jean-René Lacour

This study determined the validity and reliability of the kinematic device developed by Bosco et al. (1995) by comparing its peak force, peak velocity, and peak power measurements to data obtained simultaneously with a force platform placed under the subject’s feet. Fifteen international downhill skiers performed maximal half-squats on a guided barbell with masses of 60–180 kg. The coefficient of correlation (r) between the two peak forces (r = 0.85–0.95, p < .001), the two peak velocities (r = 0.74–0.91, p < .001), and the two peak powers (r = 0.85–0.95, p < .001) indicated that the kinematic device measurements were valid. The trial-to-trial reliability of half-squat exercises measured by the kinematic device gave an intraclass coefficient of correlation (CR) of: 0.70-0.90 for peak force, 0.62-0.90 for peak velocity, and 0.57-0.91 for peak power. There were no statistical differences between the two trials. The standard error of the means (SEM%) was less than 5% for peak force, less than 4% for peak velocity, and less than 7% for power. The high CR and low SEM% indicate that the kinematic device is reliable. The movement recorded by the kinematic device accurately described the action measured by the force platform.

Restricted access

Alan Hreljac, Rodney T. Imamura, Rafael F. Escamilla, W. Brent Edwards and Toran MacLeod

The primary purpose of this project was to examine whether lower extremity joint kinetic factors are related to the walk–run gait transition during human locomotion. Following determination of the preferred transition speed (PTS), each of the 16 subjects walked down a 25-m runway, and over a floor-mounted force platform at five speeds (70, 80, 90, 100, and 110% of the PTS), and ran over the force platform at three speeds (80, 100, and 120% of the PTS) while being videotaped (240 Hz) from the right sagittal plane. Two-dimensional kinematic data were synchronized with ground reaction force data (960 Hz). After smoothing, ankle and knee joint moments and powers were calculated using standard inverse dynamics calculations. The maximum dorsiflexor moment was the only variable tested that increased as walking speed increased and then decreased when gait changed to a run at the PTS, meeting the criteria set to indicate that this variable influences the walk–run gait transition during human locomotion. This supports previous research suggesting that an important factor in changing gaits at the PTS is the prevention of undue stress in the dorsiflexor muscles.

Restricted access

Christopher J. Durall, Thomas W. Kernozek, Melissa Kersten, Maria Nitz, Jonathan Setz and Sara Beck

Context:

Impaired postural control in single-limb stance and aberrant drop-landing mechanics have been implicated separately as risk factors for noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, but associations between these variables has not been reported.

Objective:

To determine whether there are associations between single-limb postural control and drop-landing mechanics.

Setting:

University motion-analysis laboratory.

Design:

Single-leg-landing kinematic and kinetic data were collected after participants dropped from a hang bar. Postural-control variables COP excursion and velocity were assessed during single-leg barefoot standing on a force platform.

Participants:

A convenience sample of 24 healthy women.

Main Outcome Measures:

Pearson product–moment correlation coefficients.

Results:

Strong associations were measured between maximal knee-abduction moment and COP excursion (r = .529, P = .003) and average COP velocity (r = .529, P = .003). Strong inverse associations were measured between minimum hip-flexion angle and COP excursion (r = −.521, P = .003) and average COP velocity (r = −.519, P = .003).

Conclusions:

Participants with decreased postural control had higher knee-abduction moments and a more extended hip on landing, which have been implicated separately as risk factors for ACL injury. A longitudinal prospective analysis is needed to determine whether force-platform postural-control measures can identify athletes at risk for ACL injury.