Search Results

You are looking at 41 - 50 of 351 items for :

  • "professional development" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Bomna Ko, Tristan Wallhead and Phillip Ward

Restricted access

Melissa Parker, Kevin Patton, Matthew Madden and Christina Sinclair

Despite the benefits associated with teacher development through participation in communities of practice, many questions about these groups remain unanswered. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine a group of elementary physical education teachers as a community of practice whose objective was to develop and disseminate district-wide elementary curriculum. Participants included four teachers, the district curriculum coordinator, and project facilitators. Results identify the importance of a catalyst, a vision for students and the project, the importance of support, the significance of personal and professional relationships, and the realization of empowerment as critical. Ultimately, the development of curriculum was a meaningful, purposeful, and authentic task that allowed the transformation of this group. Adhering to the assumption that learning takes place within social practice, these data provide valuable insight as to the contexts that underlie the ability to mediate change, the relationships between individuals, and their ability to transform individual and group identity.

Restricted access

Gi-Yong Koo, Michael J. Diacin, Jam Khojasteh and Anthony W. Dixon

The internship could have a significant impact upon the student’s desire to enter the field after graduation. Despite a substantial amount of research that has been conducted with employees in many fields, relatively little research has been conducted with sport management interns. The purpose of this study, therefore, was twofold: (1) investigate the satisfaction of student-interns with characteristics of the internship experience and (2) investigate the effect of students’ satisfaction with their internship on their affective occupational commitment for and subsequent intentions to pursue employment in the sport management field. A total of 248 undergraduate students from two universities in the Southeastern United States completed a survey. Participants generally indicated satisfaction with opportunities to develop pertinent skills, engage in meaningful tasks, and build professional networks during the internship. Those who reported satisfaction with the internship were more likely to enter the field after graduation than those reporting dissatisfaction. Implications of these findings for site supervisors and sport management faculty were discussed.

Restricted access

Fiona Chambers and Robin Gregg

This paper highlights the status of coaching and coach education policy and practice on the island of Ireland. The island of Ireland represents a unique setting as it comprises a hybrid jurisdiction of (a) the United Kingdom and Northern Ireland and (b) the Republic of Ireland. A historical and sociopolitical backdrop provides insight into how key agencies develop coaching and coach education policy and practice in a highly complex dual environment. A five-step meta-synthesis process of data collection and analysis revealed key policy and practice issues on the island relating to (a) the coaching workforce and (b) coach education system.

Restricted access

Dana K. Voelker and Justine J. Reel

The number of studies examining eating disorders and body image in sport has increased, although several major challenges associated with conducting this research must be addressed to continue growth. In this paper, we describe these challenges based on our professional experiences and the academic literature. Mistrust of researchers and the area of study, communication gaps, and factors that affect data quality are among the strong barriers discussed. However, we suggest that these challenges may be addressed by building stronger partnerships between researchers and practitioners and offer critical steps for developing meaningful professional relationships that will help move the field forward.

Restricted access

Phillip Ward and Shiri Ayvazo

Pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) is a frequently used concept in the educational community. Its usage is so widespread it appears to function as a “lingua franca” across different subject areas and among researchers within a subject area. Critiques of PCK have suggested it may function at best as a heuristic and at worst as a masquerade; because there has been little consensus on its conceptualization and in many studies there is no operational definition of PCK provided. Recent studies, however, have moved both the conceptualization and measurement of PCK forward in ways that allow the concept to be operationalized. In this article we examine how PCK has evolved since Shulman’s (1986) initial conceptualization, and discuss how the concept has been used in physical education. We describe and examine five recurring research findings for PCK in physical education. These are that PCK can be described on continuums of maturity and effectiveness; is learned, is specific to content and context; and is strongly related to both content knowledge and knowledge of students.

Restricted access

Nate McCaughtry, Jeffrey Martin, Pamela Hodges Kulinna and Donetta Cothran

This study used an emotional geographies theoretical framework to analyze the emotional dimensions of urban teacher change. Fifteen urban physical education teachers involved in a comprehensive curriculum reform project were interviewed and observed multiple times across one school year. Data were analyzed using inductive analysis, and trustworthiness measures included triangulation, peer debriefing, researcher journals, and member checks. Teachers reported that emotional dimensions related to their urban students, colleagues, and status heavily influenced their engagement in the project. The discussion section maps the emotional dimensions of these teachers’ change experiences onto an emotional geographies framework that situates their experiences in change literature and offers a roadmap for future reform initiatives.