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Daniel L. Borges, Mayara Gabrielle Silva, Luan Nascimento Silva, João Vyctor Fortes, Erika Thalita Costa, Rebeca Pessoa Assunção, Carlos Magno Lima, Vinícius José da Silva Nina, Mário Bernardo-Filho and Danúbia Sá Caputo

Background:

Physical activity is beneficial in several clinical situations and recommended for patients with ischemic heart disease, as well as for those undergoing cardiac surgery.

Methods:

In a randomized controlled trial, 34 patients underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. A randomized control group (n = 15) submitted to conventional physiotherapy. The intervention group (n = 19) received the same protocol plus additional aerobic exercise with cycle ergometer. Pulmonary function by spirometry, respiratory muscle strength by manovacuometry, and functional capacity through 6-minute walking test was assessed before surgery and at hospital discharge.

Results:

There was significant reduction in pulmonary function in both groups. In both groups, inspiratory muscle strength was maintained while expiratory muscle strength significantly decreased. Functional capacity was maintained in the intervention group (364.5 [324.5 to 428] vs. 348 [300.7 to 413.7] meters, P = .06), but it decreased significantly in control group patients (320 [288.5 to 393.0] vs. 292 [237.0 to 336.0] meters, P = .01). A significant difference in functional capacity was also found in intergroup analyses at hospital discharge (P = .03).

Conclusion:

Aerobic exercise applied early on coronary artery bypass grafting patients may promote maintenance of functional capacity, with no impact on pulmonary function and respiratory muscle strength when compared with conventional physiotherapy.

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Mercedes Vélez-Toral, Débora Godoy-Izquierdo, Nicolás Mendoza Ladrón de Guevara, Carlos de Teresa Galván, Alberto Salamanca Ballesteros and Juan F. Godoy García

Background:

This study explored multidimensional outcomes that were derived from the adherence to regular exercise among previously sedentary postmenopausal 45 to 64 years old women who engaged in a ~20-week exercise program.

Methods:

A randomized controlled trial with between-group (intervention and control women) and within-subject measures (baseline, postintervention, and 3-month and 12-month follow-ups) was conducted. HRQoL and several indicators of cardio-metabolic status and fitness were assessed.

Results:

After the intervention, the participants experienced a positive change in their short and long-term physical and mental health, with significant enhancements in several HRQoL dimensions, particularly mental well-being (23.3% of change) and menopause-related health and subdomains (17.0% of change) (P < .01). Improvements were maintained or continued (eg, mental well-being) overtime. These outcomes were accompanied by significant improvements in cardio-metabolic status and fitness, including weight, BMI, cardio-respiratory fitness and flexibility (up to 16.2% of change, P < .05). After the intervention, the intervention group exhibited better HRQoL than the control group at each of the measurement phases. Between-group differences were also observed for some indicators of cardiovascular health and flexibility.

Conclusions:

Our findings add evidence on the association of positive outcomes on HRQoL with improvements in cardio-metabolic health and fitness status after the adoption of an active lifestyle.

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Adam B. Lloyd, David R. Lubans, Ronald C. Plotnikoff and Philip J. Morgan

Background:

This study examined potential parenting-related mediators of children’s physical activity and dietary behavior change in the Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids (HDHK) community program.

Methods:

A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 45 overweight/obese (mean [SD] age = 39.8 [5.4] years; BMI = 32.4 [3.8]) fathers and their children (n = 77; 58% boys; mean [SD] age = 7.7 [2.5] years). Families were randomized to either the HDHK program or wait-list control group. The program involved 7 sessions. Fathers and their children were assessed at baseline and at 14 weeks for physical activity (pedometery) and core food intake (Questionnaire). Fathers’ lifestyle-related parenting practices included; self-efficacy, beliefs, modeling, logistic support, rules, cophysical activity, shared mealtime frequency and intentions.

Results:

Significant intervention effects were found for cophysical activity and modeling physical activity. Cophysical activity mediated children’s physical activity in the intervention (‘mediated effect,’ AB = 653, 95% CI = 4–2050) and was responsible for 59.5% of the intervention effect. Fathers’ beliefs mediated children’s percent energy from core foods (AB = 1.51, 95% CI = 0.05–5.55) and accounted for 72.9% of the intervention effect.

Conclusions:

Participation in the HDHK program positively impacted on fathers’ cophysical activity with their child and beliefs about healthy eating which mediated changes in children’s diet and physical activity behaviors.

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Rochelle R. Costa, Adriana C.K. Buttelli, Leandro Coconcelli, Laura F. Pereira, Alexandra F. Vieira, Alex de O. Fagundes, Juliano B. Farinha, Thais Reichert, Ricardo Stein and Luiz F.M. Kruel

. The results of this randomized controlled trial show that water-based training can be adopted as an effective nonpharmacological treatment alternative for elderly women with dyslipidemia. The improvements in lipid profile due to WA and WR are similar and may contribute to reducing the risk of

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Gregory A. Hand, Robin P. Shook, Daniel P. O’Connor, Madison M. Kindred, Sarah Schumacher, Clemens Drenowatz, Amanda E. Paluch, Stephanie Burgess, John E. Blundell and Steven N. Blair

aerobic exercise and weight loss: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials . Am J Med . 2011 ; 124 ( 8 ): 747 – 755 . PubMed ID: 21787904 doi:10.1016/j.amjmed.2011.02.037 10.1016/j.amjmed.2011.02.037 21787904 2. Dhurandhar EJ , Kaiser KA , Dawson JA , Alcorn AS

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Jacob D. Meyer, Mary S. Hayney, Christopher L. Coe, Cameron L. Ninos and Bruce P. Barrett

circulation ( Gleeson, McFarlin, & Flynn, 2006 ). While the specific pathways linking exercise to inflammatory activity are unclear, population-based studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have consistently demonstrated significant associations between physical activity or fitness and lower levels of

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Sabrine N. Costa, Edgar R. Vieira and Paulo C. B. Bento

falls and mobility in frail and pre-frail older adults: A multicenter randomized controlled trial . Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 87 ( 7 ), 885 – 896 . PubMed ID: 16813773 doi:10.1016/j.apmr.2006.04.005 10.1016/j.apmr.2006.04.005 Ferrucci , L. , Guralnik , J.M. , Studenski

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Maria À. Cebrià i Iranzo, Mercè Balasch-Bernat, María Á. Tortosa-Chuliá and Sebastià Balasch-Parisi

-group randomized controlled trial in which 81 institutionalized older Spanish adults with sarcopenia were randomized in a single sequence (simple randomization) to one of three balanced groups: one control group (CG) and two resistance training groups (peripheral muscle training group [PMTG] and respiratory muscle

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Jodie Andruschko, Anthony D. Okely and Phil Pearson

( Schulz, Altman, & Moher, 2010 ). Participants A 6-month, 2-arm parallel group, pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted in a co-educational secondary school setting in Sydney, Australia. All girls ( n  = 292) from Grades 7–9 (first three years of secondary school, typically ages 12 to 15

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Guohua Zheng, Xin Zheng, Junzhe Li, Tingjin Duan, Kun Ling, Jing Tao and Lidian Chen

 al., 2015 ; Hayashi et al., 2005 ). However, the effects of Tai Chi on cerebral hemodynamics in older community people have not been studied. The aim of this study was to conduct a randomized controlled trial to examine the effects of Tai Chi on cerebral hemodynamics and the secondary outcomes of physical