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Iñigo Mujika, Shona Halson, Louise M. Burke, Gloria Balagué and Damian Farrow

article, therefore, is to review the available evidence underpinning integrated periodization. In particular, this review will focus on the following aspects by which athletic preparation can be periodized for optimal performance in competition: • Training periodization • Periodization of recovery

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Jason C. Bartram, Dominic Thewlis, David T. Martin and Kevin I. Norton

made great inroads into developing a model capable of tracking not only the depletion of W ′, but also its replenishment or recovery. The additional framework to the original model states that, when working at an intensity below CP, an individual’s W ′ will replenish. Skiba et al have published 2

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Callum G. Brownstein, Derek Ball, Dominic Micklewright and Neil V. Gibson

Repeated sprints are an effective and time-efficient method of training team-sport athletes ( 29 ). Studies investigating the use of repeated sprints on performance, recovery, and metabolic response have attempted to optimize the training stimulus by varying work-to-rest ratios ( 20 ), numbers of

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William Abbott, Adam Brett, Emma Cockburn and Tom Clifford

function recovery in the days following strenuous exercise. 9 Nonetheless, the majority of the studies assessing the effects of immediate protein feeding on exercise recovery are performed in the morning, when there are several opportunities for additional protein feeding and, thus, further stimulation of

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Paula B. Debien, Marcelly Mancini, Danilo R. Coimbra, Daniel G.S. de Freitas, Renato Miranda and Maurício G. Bara Filho

the athletes’ high level of performance throughout many months of competition. 7 – 9 The success of training, in turn, depends on the balance between the magnitude and distribution of the training load and the recovery applied during the season. 10 – 12 In order to avoid negative adaptations to

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Mitchell Naughton, Joanna Miller and Gary J. Slater

potential to adversely affect neuromuscular function and prolong athletic recovery. It is well known that high-intensity and/or unaccustomed eccentric exercise causes EIMD through exposure to an inappropriate level of mechanical stress. 6 EIMD results in soreness, myofibrillar disruption, and release of

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Adam C. King

) following the resolution of cognitive and behavioral symptoms; however, asymptomatic individuals often exhibit persist motor impairments in locomotion 1 and postural control 2 that can extend beyond acute recovery. Therefore, a need remains relative to concussion evaluations to detect subtle motor

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Gustavo Tomazoli, Joao B. Marques, Abdulaziz Farooq and Joao R. Silva

fatigue monitoring system and effective strategies to aid player’s recovery as part of the training process and overall practice organization. 3 Athlete self-reported measures (ASRM) are “paper-based or electronic records of an athlete’s perceived physical, psychological, and/or social well

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Maria C. Madueno, Vincent J. Dalbo, Joshua H. Guy, Kate E. Giamarelos, Tania Spiteri and Aaron T. Scanlan

Repeated-sprint ability is an important attribute for basketball players given the frequent high-intensity movements performed across game-play. 1 , 2 Repeated-sprints are short (≤10 s) and executed at maximal effort with brief recovery (≤60 s) between bouts. 3 During repeated-sprints, adenosine

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Rebecca Quinlan and Jessica A. Hill

associated with a number of symptoms that include soreness, a decreased range of motion, swelling, and a reduced ability of the affected muscle to produce force. 2 These symptoms can have a detrimental effect on performance, thus these strategies that can attenuate symptoms and accelerate recovery are