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Christine A. Pellegrini, Jing Song, Rowland W. Chang, Pamela A. Semanik, Jungwha Lee, Linda Ehrlich-Jones, Daniel Pinto and Dorothy D. Dunlop

Background:

We examined if changes in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), light activity, and sedentary behavior are related to weight change over a 2-year period in obese adults with/elevated risk for knee osteoarthritis.

Methods:

Weight, physical activity, and sedentary time at baseline and 2 years were obtained from 459 obese participants from the Osteoarthritis Initiative. Weight change was categorized as ≥ 10 lbs, 5.0 to 9.9 lbs, 4.9 to –4.9 lbs, –5.0 to –9.9 lbs, and ≤ –10 lbs. We examined the association between 2-year weight change categories and changes in activity/sedentary time from accelerometer monitoring by multiple linear regression adjusted for baseline weight, demographic, and health factors.

Results:

Across the 5 weight categories (loss to gain), average 2-year change ranged from -7.4 to 28.0 sedentary minutes/day, 4.2 to –23.1 light activity minutes/day, and 3.2 to –4.9 MVPA minutes/day, respectively. Higher weight loss categories were separately associated with increased MVPA (P for trend < 0.001) and less sedentary gain (P for trend = 0.01). Weight loss categories had a strong trend with light activity gain but not statistically significant (P for trend = 0.06).

Conclusions:

Small increases in MVPA and decreases in sedentary time over 2 years were associated with weight loss among adults with obesity and with or at elevated risk for knee osteoarthritis.

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Heidi J. Syväoja, Anna Kankaanpää, Jouni Kallio, Harto Hakonen, Janne Kulmala, Charles H. Hillman, Anu-Katriina Pesonen and Tuija H. Tammelin

raised concerns about the effects of a physically inactive lifestyle on children’s health during maturation and across the lifespan, as physical activity (PA) continues to decrease and sedentary time (ST) continues to increase from childhood to adolescence and adulthood. 5 , 6 The association of a

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Natasha Reid, Justin W. Keogh, Paul Swinton, Paul A. Gardiner and Timothy R. Henwood

, & Luiz, 2014 ). Furthermore, previous studies have indicated that there is a link between sedentary time and all-cause mortality ( Biddle et al., 2016 ) with the risk increased by 34% among those who sit for 10 hr or more per day ( Chau et al., 2013 ). However, the majority of studies examining the

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Daniel Berglind, Lena Hansson, Per Tynelius and Finn Rasmussen

Background:

Levels of physical activity (PA) affect health already at 4 years of age. The aims of this study were to describe levels and patterns of PA and sedentary time (ST) in a sample of 4-year-old Swedish children and to assess the number of children achieving PA guidelines throughout the week.

Methods:

Data from 540 4-year-old children enrolled in the population-based PRIMROSE trial was used. PA was measured for a period of 1 week by the Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometer. Average PA, time spent in light PA, moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) and ST were assessed.

Results:

On average children spent 6.7% of the day in MVPA and 45% of the day being sedentary and 33% (n = 178) of the children met the PA guidelines of 60 minutes of MVPA per day. Boys spent 56.8 (SD 21.8) minutes/day in MVPA, while girls spent 43.0 (SD 18.1) minutes/day in MVPA (P < .001).

Conclusions:

Four-year-old children spent almost half of the day being sedentary and only one-third meet the recommended PA guidelines. This finding is alarming as higher levels of PA, already at 4 years of age, seem to reduce the risk of childhood obesity and provides long-term health benefits.

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Dorothy D. Dunlop, Jing Song, Emily K. Arntson, Pamela A. Semanik, Jungwha Lee, Rowland W. Chang and Jennifer M. Hootman

Background:

The harmful relationship of sedentary behavior to health may reflect an exchange of sedentary activity for moderateto- vigorous physical activity (MVPA), or sedentary behavior may be a separate risk factor. We examined whether time spent in sedentary behavior is related to disability in activities of daily living (ADL), independent of time spent in MVPA in older adults.

Methods:

The nationally representative 2003−2006 National Health and Nutrition Examinations Surveys (NHANES) included 2286 adults aged 60 years and older in whom physical activity was assessed by accelerometer. The association between ADL task disability and the daily percentage of sedentary time was evaluated by multiple logistic regression.

Results:

These adults on average spent 9h/d being sedentary during waking hours and 4.5% reported ADL disability. The odds of ADL disability were 46% greater (odds ratio, 1.46; 95% confidence interval, 1.07−1.98) for each daily hour spent in sedentary behavior, adjusted for MVPA and socioeconomic and health factors.

Conclusion:

These US national data show a strong relationship between greater time spent in sedentary behavior and the presence of ADL disability, independent of time spent in moderate or vigorous activity. These findings support programs encouraging older adults to decrease sedentary behavior regardless of their engagement in moderate or vigorous activity.

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Pauline M. Genin, Frédéric Dutheil, Benjamin Larras, Yoland Esquirol, Yves Boirie, Angelo Tremblay, Bruno Pereira, Corinne Praznoczy, David Thivel and Martine Duclos

The modernization of our societies has resulted in a steady increase in service industry occupations (tertiarization), which have favored increased sedentary time, while reducing occupational physical activity. In less than 50 years, the United States has increased sedentary professions by about 20

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Sarah Kozey-Keadle, John Staudenmayer, Amanda Libertine, Marianna Mavilia, Kate Lyden, Barry Braun and Patty Freedson

Background:

Individuals may compensate for exercise training by modifying nonexercise behavior (ie, increase sedentary time (ST) and decrease nonexercise physical activity [NEPA]).

Purpose:

To compare ST and NEPA during a 12-week exercise training and/or lifestyle intervention.

Methods:

Fifty-seven overweight/obese participants (19 M/39 F) completed the study (mean ± SD; age 43.6 ± 9.9 y, BMI 35.1 ± 4.6 kg/m2). There were no between-group differences in activity levels at baseline. Four-arm quasi-experimental intervention study 1) EX: exercise 5 days per week at a moderate intensity (40% to 65% VO2peak) 2) rST: reduce ST and increase NEPA, 3) EX-rST: combination of EX and rST and 4) CON: maintain habitual behavior.

Results:

For the EX group, ST did not decrease significantly (mean ((95% confidence interval) 0.48 (–2.2 to 3.1)% and there was no changes in NEPA at week-12 compared with baseline. The changes were variable, with approximately 50% of participants increasing ST and decreasing NEPA. The rST group decreased ST (–4.8 (0.8 to 7.9)% and increased NEPA. EX-rST significantly decreased ST (–5.1 (–2.2 to 7.9)% and increased time in NEPA at week-12 compared with baseline. The control group increased ST by 4.3 (0.8 to 7.9)%.

Conclusions:

Changes in nonexercise ST and NEPA are variable among participants in an exercise-training program, with nearly half decreasing NEPA compared with baseline. Interventions targeting multiple behaviors (ST and NEPA) may effectively reduce compensation and increase daily activity.

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Kelly A. Mackintosh, Nicola D. Ridgers, Rachel E. Evans and Melitta A. McNarry

sedentary, nor the accumulation of PA or sedentary time. Indeed, the majority of PA research to date has focused on the total volume of PA rather than the manner in which this activity is accumulated with regard to bout frequency and duration. Gabel et al 21 reported sedentary bouts of ≥5 minutes to be

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Davy Vancampfort, Brendon Stubbs, James F. Sallis, Justine Nabanoba, David Basangwa, Adewale L. Oyeyemi, Sandra S. Kasoma, Marc De Hert, Inez Myin-Germeys and James Mugisha

population without mental illness. Other neighborhood characteristics such as perception of crime safety had a much stronger association with physical activity in outpatients with a mental illness than in the general population. 24 Sedentary time defined as the time spent in behaviors that involve sitting or

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Anna K. Porter, Krystin J. Matthews, Deborah Salvo and Harold W. Kohl III

Background:

Most US adolescents do not meet guidelines of at least 60 daily minutes of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity. In addition, sedentary behaviors among this age group are of increasing concern. This study examined the association of movement behaviors with cardiovascular fitness among US adolescents.

Methods:

Data from the 2012 NHANES National Youth Fitness Survey were used to assess the association of movement behaviors (physical activity, sedentary time, screen time) with cardiovascular fitness among adolescent males and females. Multiple logistic regressions were used to test the independent and interactive effects of movement behaviors on cardiovascular fitness.

Results:

Among females, physical activity was directly associated with cardiovascular fitness; no significant association was observed between sedentary behaviors and CVF. Among males, sedentary time moderated the relationship between physical activity and cardiovascular fitness, such that a significant, direct association was only observed among those with high sedentary time (OR: 5.01; 95% CI: 1.60, 15.70).

Conclusions:

Results from this cross-sectional analysis suggest that among female US adolescents, physical activity, but not sedentary behavior, is associated with cardiovascular fitness. Among males, the interaction between physical activity and sedentary time seems to be important for cardiovascular fitness. Longitudinal studies are warranted to confirm these findings.