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Lydia Kwak, Maria Hagströmer and Michael Sjostrom

Background:

To be able to draw any conclusions regarding the health effects of occupational physical activity (OPA), more information is needed regarding valid measures to assess OPA. Aims were to compare OPA as assessed with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire long version (IPAQ-L) with OPA assessed with an accelerometer and to assess the contribution of OPA to total PA.

Methods:

Working adults (n = 441; mean age = 49.4 yrs; 44% males) wore an accelerometer for 7 days in free-living situations and completed the IPAQ-L. Comparisons were made between IPAQ-L-work and accelerometer data limited to working time (Moderate and Vigorous PA (accelerometer-MVPA-work) and average intensity). Subgroup analyses were performed.

Results:

Spearman correlation was r = .46 (P < .01) between IPAQ-L-work and accelerometer-MVPA-work. Correlations ranged from r = .27 to r = .55 in respectively obese and overweight subjects. The contribution of IPAQ-L-work to IPAQ-total was 24.7%.

Conclusions:

The IPAQ-L work domain is a moderately good measure of time spent on MVPA at work and can be used to assess the contribution of OPA to total PA. This study provides valuable information regarding the use of the IPAQ-L in assessing work domain specific PA, and underscores the importance of assessing OPA, as it can contribute for a substantial part to total PA.

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Roel De Ridder, Julien Lebleu, Tine Willems, Cedric De Blaiser, Christine Detrembleur and Philip Roosen

needed to obtain the gait parameters. This aspect is really important to facilitate technology adoption. 7 However, before using them for clinical interpretation, we need to define their reliability and validity. The latter can be done by comparing the spatiotemporal parameters of gait obtained from the

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James W. Navalta, Jeffrey Montes, Nathaniel G. Bodell, Charli D. Aguilar, Ana Lujan, Gabriela Guzman, Brandi K. Kam, Jacob W. Manning and Mark DeBeliso

Groot, 2017 ; Nelson, Kaminsky, Dickin, & Montoye, 2016 ), or during flat ground walking and/or stair climbing ( An, Jones, Kang, Welk, & Lee, 2017 ; Huang, Xu, Yu, & Shull, 2016 ). These settings represent conditions that are relatively controlled. While some devices return more valid step measures

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Adam Šimůnek, Jan Dygrýn, Lukáš Jakubec, Filip Neuls, Karel Frömel and Gregory John Welk

has evaluated total energy expenditure ( 2 , 7 , 28 ), time spent in different zones of PA intensity, and step counts per day per week ( 1 , 2 , 3 , 21 ), as well as in specific isolated activities ( 3 , 9 , 14 , 28 , 32 ). In general, studies have supported the validity of the step count estimates in

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Yuri Hosokawa, William M. Adams and Douglas J. Casa

Context: It is unknown how valid esophageal, rectal, and gastrointestinal temperatures (TES, TRE, and TGI) compare after exercise-induced hyperthermia under different hydration states. Objective: To examine the differences between TES, TRE, and TGI during passive rest following exercise-induced hyperthermia under 2 different hydration states: euhydrated (EU) and hypohydrated (HY). Design: Randomized crossover design. Setting: Controlled laboratory setting. Participants: 9 recreationally active male participants (mean ± SD age 24 ± 4 y, height 177.3 ± 9.9 cm, body mass 76.7 ± 11.6 kg, body fat 14.7% ± 5.8%). Intervention: Participants completed 2 trials (EU and HY) consisting of a bout of treadmill exercise (a 10-min walk at 4.8-7.2 km/h at a 5% grade followed by a 20-min jog at 8.0-12.1 km/h at a 1% grade) in a hot environment (ambient temperature 39.3 ± 1.0°C, relative humidity 37.6% ± 6.0%, wet bulb globe temperature 31.3 ± 1.5°C) followed by passive rest. Main Outcome Measures: Root-mean-squared difference (RMSD) was used to compare the variance of temperature readings at corresponding time points for TRE vs TGI, TRE vs TES, and TGI vs TES in EU and HY. RMSD values were compared using 3-way repeated-measures ANOVA. Post hoc analysis of significant main effects was done using Tukey honestly significant difference with significance set at P < .05. Results: RMSD values (°C) for all device comparisons were significantly different in EU (TRE-TGI, 0.11 ± 0.12; TRE-TES, 1.58 ± 1.01; TGI-TES, 2.04 ± 1.19) than HY (TRE-TGI, 0.22 ± 0.28; TRE-TES, 1.27 ± 0.61; TGI-TES, 1.16 ± 0.76) (P < .01). Across the 45-min bout of passive rest, there were no differences in TRE, TGI, and TES between EU and HY trials (P = .468). Conclusions: During passive rest after exercise in the heat, TRE and TGI were in good agreement when tracking body temperature, with a better agreement appearing in those maintaining a state of euhydration versus those who became hypohydrated during exercise; however, this small difference does not appear to be of clinical significance. The large differences were observed when comparing TGI and TRE with TES.

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Kerri L. Vasold, Andrew C. Parks, Deanna M.L. Phelan, Matthew B. Pontifex and James M. Pivarnik

displacement plethysmography has shown high reliability and validity for evaluating body composition in many populations, and it has been used frequently as a criterion measure for field techniques in the past two decades, as other methods such as hydrodensitometry and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry are not

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Richard A. Brindle, David Ebaugh and Clare E. Milner

is unclear whether the peak force during a hip abductor eccentric strength test occurs before or after the leg begins to lower. For measures to be useful in clinical decision making, they need to be both reliable and valid. Substantial intrarater reliability of a hip abductor eccentric strength test

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Damir Zubac, Drazen Cular and Uros Marusic

Olympic combat athletes, 8 an ongoing debate persists in the literature regarding noninvasive whole-body fluid-deficit characterization in this athletic community. For example, a cross-sectional study of Fernandez-Elias et al 9 recommended U SG as a valid alternative to track fluid deficit in Spanish

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Zachary C. Pope, Nan Zeng, Xianxiong Li, Wenfeng Liu and Zan Gao

technology to provide daily EE estimates at rest, during activities of daily living, and during PA or exercise ( Fitbit, 2016 ; TomTom, 2017 ). Only a paucity of the available literature, however, has conducted smartwatch EE estimate validation. Indeed, literature has mostly examined the validity of

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Esra Uzelpasaci, Türkan Akbayrak, Serap Özgül, Ceren Orhan, Emine Baran, Gülbala Nakip, Sinan Beksac and Semra Topuz

easy, inexpensive, and noninvasive tools to use and allow accurate estimation of the intensity and type of physical activity. In addition, studies in which physical activity is assessed by questionnaires and diaries have shown that these methods are valid and reliable with significant correlation